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Is There Glucose In Meat?

Composition Of Meat - Water, Carbohydrates, Minerals And Vitamins

Composition Of Meat - Water, Carbohydrates, Minerals And Vitamins

Composition of Meat - Water, Carbohydrates, Minerals and Vitamins The most abundant chemical in meat is water followed by protein then fat. Carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins occur on much smaller amounts but nevertheless are very important metabolically and nutritionally. Adipose tissue contains little moisture; therefore, the fatter the animal, the lower the total water content of its carcass or cuts. Beef muscle from mature and relatively fat animals may contain as little as 45 percent moisture, while veal muscle from very youthful and relatively lean animals may contain as much as 72 percent moisture. Texture, color and flavor of muscle are affected by the amount of water in muscle tissue. A large percentage of the water in muscle tissue exists as free molecules within the muscle fibers; a smaller percentage is located in the connective tissue. it is possible for some of the water to remain (during storage, curing and heat treatment) within muscle fibers because of the three-dimensional structure of the fibers; water retained under forces of pressure and temperature increase is termed bound water;" that which is lost is called free water The water- holding capacity of the muscle can be decreased by disruptions of muscle structure. Grinding, chopping, freezing, thawing, salting, degradation of connective tissue by enzymatic or chemical means, application of other chemicals or organic additives that change acidity (pH), and heating are treatments that can affect the final water content of meat products. The primary carbohydrate reservoir of the animal body is the liver. That organ contains about onehalf of the carbohydrates found in the body. Carbohydrates are stored as glycogen in the liver and in muscles. The remaining SO percent of carbohydrates are distributed Continue reading >>

A List Of Foods That Do Not Contain Sugar

A List Of Foods That Do Not Contain Sugar

A salmon steak with brussels sprouts and tomatoes.Photo Credit: VankaD/iStock/Getty Images A List of Foods That Do Not Contain Sugar Lau Hanly runs Fierce For Life, a nutrition and fitness company that helps young women start with healthy eating and smart training without overwhelming them. She has a certificate of nutrition, and provide individual coaching, standard fitness and nutrition programs, and group training. Eliminating sugar from your diet can significantly improve both your health and the state of your waistline. While many foods have small amounts of naturally occurring sugar, you can avoid anything that has added sugar, or that is very high in natural sugars, such as dried fruit and fruit juice. Avoiding processed foods makes cutting sugar out of your life much easier. Lean, unprocessed meats do not contain any sugar. Beef, chicken, lamb, pork, veal, rabbit, turkey, salmon and tuna are completely sugar-free, and you can prepare appetizing meals with them without adding any sugar. Steer clear of processed or canned meats such as bacon, cured ham, chorizo, pancetta and sausage, as they can have sugar added to act as a preservative. Nonstarchy vegetables have fractional amounts of natural fructose -- less than a gram of sugar per 50-gram serving. Starchy vegetables, such as sweet potatoes and pumpkins, have a higher sugar content. The best vegetable options include avocados, artichokes, asparagus, beets, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, eggplant, collard greens, kale, lettuce, turnips, parsnips, mushrooms, radishes, tomatoes and squash. You can also use frozen vegetables if it's not possible to buy everything fresh. Natural, unflavored dairy foods are free from added sugar. Although milk and milk products contain lactose -- a naturally occur Continue reading >>

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

Not all red meat is created equal – some isn’t even good enough to even be considered food. Yet when a news article talks about red meat being bad for you, you can bet the author (or the study behind the news) failed to distinguish between processed meat and unprocessed meat, as well as overcooked meat and properly cooked meat. That’s not even considering grass-fed meat vs. industrial meat, which I’ve blogged about extensively. “Red-meat-is-bad” articles don’t always deserve a rebuttal because *most* red meat actually is bad for you. However, it’s a major mistake to say all red meat is bad for you. This post serves to confront misleading headlines about red meat and diabetes risk. Let’s ask a few questions, see what the science actually says, and talk about the Bulletproof recommendations. Processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, deli meats etc. contain high omega-6’s, often have mold toxins called mycotoxins, and nitrates that can combine with bad gut bacteria. All of these can be correlated with an increased risk of diabetes. Instead, insist on eating grass fed, low toxin meat to promote good health and optimize performance. Research Doesn’t Distinguish Between Processed Red Meat and Unprocessed Red Meat When articles suggest red meat causes chronic diseases like diabetes, you would expect a high degree of specificity and accuracy. Unfortunately all you get are alarming headlines and half-truths. When you see blog posts like “Hot Dogs, Bacon and Red Meat Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk,” you should ask yourself how the authors justify lumping hot dogs (a blend of soy, wheat, MSG, and cast off animal parts) in with meat and what the study design looked like. Of course, the recent news about diabetes referenced a study that did not distinguish h Continue reading >>

Sources Of Glucose

Sources Of Glucose

Our bodies convert food into energy. Although we get energy and calories from carbohydrate, protein, and fat, our main source of energy is from carbohydrate. Our bodies convert carbohydrate into glucose, a type of sugar. See Illustration: How Food Affects Blood Sugar Many foods contain a combination of carbohydrate, protein, and fat. The amount of each in the food we eat affects how quickly our bodies change that food into glucose. This is how different foods affect how our blood sugar levels: Carbohydrate: Includes bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, vegetables, fruit, sugar, yogurt, and milk. Our bodies change 100 percent of the carbohydrate we eat into glucose. This affects our blood sugar levels quickly, within an hour or two after eating Protein: Includes fish, meat, cheese, and peanut butter. Although our bodies change some of the protein we eat into glucose, most of this glucose is stored in our liver and not released into our bloodstream. Eating protein usually has very little impact on blood sugar. Fat: Includes butter, salad dressing, avocado, olive oil. We turn less than 10 percent of the fat we eat into glucose. The glucose from fat is absorbed slowly and it won't cause an immediate rise in blood sugar. Even though we don't get much glucose from fat, a meal that's high in fat can affect how fast our bodies digest carbohydrate. Because fat slows down the digestion of carbohydrate, it also slows down the rise in blood sugar levels. This sometimes can cause a high blood sugar level several hours after eating. For some people, this delayed reaction can be quite a surprise. For example, after eating a meal high in fat, a person might have a blood sugar reading that's close to normal before going to bed. But the next morning, he or she might have a fasting blood sugar t Continue reading >>

Uric Acid From Meat & Sugar

Uric Acid From Meat & Sugar

Human beings lost the ability to detoxify uric acid millions of years ago. What implications does this have for our health today? Our story starts about 15 million years ago. It was the Miocene epoch. Things seemed to be going pretty good until, it seems, two flaming meteorites smashed into what’s now Germany with an estimated power of a couple million Hiroshimas. As you can see in my 3-min. video Miocene Meteorites and Uric Acid, the crater looks quaint now, but at the time, there was a mass extinction event, wiping many animals out. Thankfully, the common ancestor of human beings and other great apes developed a mutation that may have helped them survive. We lost the ability to detoxify uric acid. Why was that a good thing? Uric acid is naturally produced by the body and may help us hold onto fat, which is good when there’s not a lot of food around thanks to pesky asteroids. Uric acid also helps us retain sodium, which is good if there aren’t a lot of salt shakers out on the savannah, and it also acts chemically as an antioxidant, which is good since green tea hadn’t been invented yet. Fast-forward 15 million years. When salt and calories abound, the last thing we need is more sodium and fat retention. But the antioxidant part we like. Unfortunately, not all antioxidant compounds are necessarily good for us. For example, the preservative chemical BHA works by preventing the oxidation of foods, but is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen. Similarly, uric acid is chemically an antioxidant, but when you have too much in your blood it can crystallize in your joints, causing a painful disease called gout. High uric acid levels may also put us at risk for high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and death. So keeping one’s uric acid levels Continue reading >>

Sugar Molecule Links Red Meat Consumption And Elevated Cancer Risk In Mice

Sugar Molecule Links Red Meat Consumption And Elevated Cancer Risk In Mice

Sugar Molecule Links Red Meat Consumption and Elevated Cancer Risk in Mice Neu5Gc, a non-human sugar found in red meat, promotes inflammation and cancer progression in rodents December 23, 2014 | Heather Buschman, PhD While people who eat a lot of red meat are known to be at higher risk for certain cancers, other carnivores are not, prompting researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to investigate the possible tumor-forming role of a sugar called Neu5Gc, which is naturally found in most mammals but not in humans. In a study published in the Dec. 29 online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists found that feeding Neu5Gc to mice engineered to be deficient in the sugar (like humans) significantly promoted spontaneous cancers. The study did not involve exposure to carcinogens or artificially inducing cancers, further implicating Neu5Gc as a key link between red meat consumption and cancer. Until now, all of our evidence linking Neu5Gc to cancer was circumstantial or indirectly predicted from somewhat artificial experimental setups, said principal investigator Ajit Varki, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine and member of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center. This is the first time we have directly shown that mimicking the exact situation in humans feeding non-human Neu5Gc and inducing anti-Neu5Gc antibodies increases spontaneous cancers in mice. Red meat is rich in Neu5Gc, a non-human sugar found to promote inflammation and cancer progression in rodents. Varkis team first conducted a systematic survey of common foods. They found that red meats (beef, pork and lamb) are rich in Neu5Gc, affirming that foods of mammalian origin such as these are the primary s Continue reading >>

Does Eating Red Meat Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Eating Red Meat Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

No matter how often I write articles defending the place of red meat in a healthy diet, there are always people who get bent out of shape whenever a new study is published with a different twist on the same old “red meat is killing us” story. Although I can’t say addressing these (often ridiculous) studies is the most exciting undertaking, I wanted to write about this one because it’s a prime example of the limitations of observational evidence, and what happens when you control for even the most simple confounding variables. Does red meat really increase your risk of diabetes? Read this to find out! The study in question is titled “Associations between red meat intake and biomarkers of inflammation and glucose metabolism in women,” and was conducted by Walter Willet and a group of other Harvard researchers. (1) Using data from the Nurse’s Health cohort, they identified a positive relationship between red meat intake and higher levels of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, fasting insulin, and Hb A1c, after adjusting for demographic, medical and lifestyle factors. CRP (and sometimes ferritin) are markers for inflammation, and elevated fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c indicate impaired glucose metabolism. Limitations of Observational Evidence Right off the bat, there’s a glaring weakness in this study that has been largely glossed over by many media reports: all but one of these associations disappeared after adjusting for BMI. As the study authors mention, excess body fat is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that people with higher BMIs have less-than-ideal biomarkers for glucose metabolism. Additionally, it’s common for people who are overweight or obese to have have underlying chronic inflammat Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Meat Affecting Blood Sugar?

Meat Affecting Blood Sugar?

Many people have mentioned how meat can have a slow long lasting affect on some peoples blood sugars (the fat? or the protein?). I think this happens to me, because I'll bolus for all my carbs for supper, and eat a steak too. I wont take any insulin for the steak, But then i'll wake up really really high. Is this the meat itself causing this, or does meat cause my carb intake to just digest slower? Should i be bolusing for meat itself? How do i do this if its not affecting me until hours later??? Help would be appreciated. Its bbq season and I need some help! D.D. Family type 1 LADA new pumper via MM-522 I'd bei untrested in others response. For me I've found if my carbs are like veggies fruit ect then the meat added doesn't affect my bolus but if my carbs are breads pasta potato like things then the meats can make a diffrence. So like I have a steak with side of Corn and some salad I bolus for the corn and salad (dressing ect) and I'm ussally fine 2 hours after with in my 140 or less goal.. IF say I have a serving of whole wheat pasta with some meat and cheese and some broccoli and white sauce even if the carbs are around the same as the 1st meal it affects me diffrently I often split my bolus taking 1/2 before and 1/2 about 30 mintues after I eat. something like 58% of protein gets converted to bg, but over a longer duration if your bg is high in the morning, then increase your basal insulin I have found that proteins/fats raise my bg but it is hours later. I do not bolus for meat but do watch for the rise later and do a correction bolus then. D.D. Family T1 since 1977 - using Novolog in an Animas pump. Protein foods like meat, fish chicken etc don't contain any carbs, but they are reasonably "insulinotropic". That means that insulin is used to metabolise these foods Continue reading >>

Meat Is As Bad As Sugar, University Of Adelaide Study Finds

Meat Is As Bad As Sugar, University Of Adelaide Study Finds

Our findings are likely to be controversial because they suggest that meat contributes to obesity prevalence worldwide at the same extent as sugar, says Professor Maciej Henneberg, head of the Biological Anthropology and Comparative Anatomy Research Unit . Once different influences are balanced between nations, such as degree of urbanisation, physical activity and calorie consumption, the research found the availability of meat contributed to 13 per cent of the obesity rate. Sugar was behind a further 13 per cent. CAN YOU STOMACH BUGS: Your food future may depend on it This is where his work diverges from previous studies. There is a dogma that fats and carbohydrates, especially fats, are the major factors contributing to obesity, Mr You said. We believe the protein in meat is directly contributing to obesity. Generally, meat represents a source of a surplus of energy. Whether we like it or not, Mr You said the fats and carbohydrates in modern diets are already supplying more than enough energy to meet our daily needs. Because meat protein is digested later than fats and carbohydrates, this makes the energy we receive from protein a surplus. (This) is then converted and stored as fat in the human body, he said. Which is not to say we should relax about how much sugar and fats are in our diet. It would be irresponsible to interpret these findings as meaning that its okay to keep eating a diet high in fats and carbohydrates, Professor Henneberg said. Clearly, that is not okay, and this is a serious issue for our modern diet and human health. Continue reading >>

Sugar Molecule May Be To Blame For Link Between Red Meat And Cancer | Daily Mail Online

Sugar Molecule May Be To Blame For Link Between Red Meat And Cancer | Daily Mail Online

Red meat may be linked with cancer because it contains a chemical that is unnatural to the human body, scientists say. Previous studies have linked red-meat consumption to a number of cancers, especially colorectal, breast, prostate, ovarian and lung cancers. Now, U.S. researchers believe the culprit is a sugar molecule called Neu5Gc, found inbeef, pork and lamb. When eaten, the body sees it as a foreign substance - and the immune system attacks it. This leads to inflammation in the body, which over time is known to promote the formation of tumours. Red meat is linked with cancer due to a sugar molecule called NeuG5c. This is unnatural to the human body, and so the immune system attacks it. This leads to inflammation, which over time causes tumours to form The same process could happen when people drink whole milk, certain cheeses and fish eggs, which all contain Neu5Gc, the researchers warned. As Neu5Gc naturally occurs in most mammals but not humans, this also explains why humans are more at risk cancer while other carnivores are not. The research is significant as it diverges from the previously held theory about red meat and cancer. Previously it was believed there was an association between red meat and cancer because of the carcinogenic chemicals linked to grilling. But grilling fish and chicken generates the same carcinogenic molecules as grilling red meat and yet they are not associated with a risk of cancer. Scientists said the fact that they have very little or no Neu5Gc could now explain why. Dr Ajit Varki, from the University of California San Diego, who led the study, said the Neu5Gc phenomenon is unprecedented. He said: 'In this case, the foreign sugar is like a Trojan Horse. It becomes part of your own cells.' 'When you react to a peanut or other allergy Continue reading >>

If Carnivores Only Eat Meat, How Do They Get Glucose For Respiration? : Askscience

If Carnivores Only Eat Meat, How Do They Get Glucose For Respiration? : Askscience

If carnivores only eat meat, how do they get glucose for respiration? [] practically_sci 30 Answer Link 2 points3 points4 points The pathways that are used to make amino acids (i.e. proteins) from glucose can be reversed to make glucose from proteins. Here is a link to an infographic which shows the metabolic connections between individual amino acids synthesis (in red) and the glucose-based respiratory pathway (in black): [] CharlesOSmith 30 Answer Link 2 points3 points4 points Muscles have stored glucose in them in the form of glycogen granules (although not as much as I'd thought see this paper where they conclude with: "with storage in muscle accounting for less than 10% of the oral load -of glucose-. Thus, contrary to the prevailing view, muscle is neither the major site of storage nor the predominant site of disposal of an oral glucose load.") It was mentioned that gluconeogensis from amino acids is the method, and indeed. "When livers from fasted rats were perfused with a mixture of physiological gluconeogenic substrates at their normal plasma levels, amino acids accounted for over 50% of the glucose formed." See this paper -it is possible to identify several features of carbohydrate metabolism in animals fed a high-protein, low carbohydrate (HP) diet that contrast with those usually observed in mammals fed balanced diets with higher carbohydrate content. These features may be summarized as follows. 1) In the fed state, animals that consume a diet rich in protein and poor in carbohydrate have lower levels of blood sugar, lower concentrations of liver glycogen, and a tendency towards reduced body glucose mass. 2) During fasting, blood sugar levels remain remarkably constant and their liver glycogen content is little affected by relatively long periods of food res Continue reading >>

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Does Red Meat Raise Blood Sugars?

Recently I have heard more and more people use the phrase “I don’t eat red meat because it bad for my blood sugars.” As red meat- along with any other cuts of meat- is a food made up of only fat and protein, eating red meat will have no immediate effect on your blood sugar. Crash course in macro-nutrients Foods can be broken up into three macro-nutrient categories: Carbohydrate, Fat and Protein. Blood sugars increase when we consume Carbohydrate foods- fruits, rice, beans, pastas, breads, milk, and starchy vegetables such as corn, potatoes and winter squash. As these foods are digested into their basic components- glucose is released into the bloodstream. This glucose is what causes blood sugars to raise after eating a food containing Carbohydrates. Protein foods however do not have glucose as part of their elemental structure, instead they break down into amino acids. Amino acids aid in building muscle and repairing cells in your body. Fats can be either saturated or unsaturated fats and fuel cells providing a required source of energy for our brains for survival. Red meat Foods are often a combination of these three macronutrients. Take red meat for example: Beef contains both protein and fat, but no carbohydrates. Where then does the misconception that red meat hurts blood sugars come from? Red meat is typically high in fats, especially saturated fatty acids. Foods containing fat are higher in calories which may lead to poor weight control if eaten in excess. As mentioned before, fats are essential for brain and cell health, but the American Diabetes Association recommends limiting fats to less than 30% of total calorie consumption with saturated fats making up less than 10% calorie consumption. Saturated fatty acids are the types of fat that stay solid at room Continue reading >>

Meat In Modern Diet, Just As Bad As Sugar, Correlates With Worldwideobesity: An Ecological Analysis

Meat In Modern Diet, Just As Bad As Sugar, Correlates With Worldwideobesity: An Ecological Analysis

E-mail: [emailprotected] ; [emailprotected] Received date: April 28, 2016; Accepted date: June 3, 2016; Published date: June 8, 2016 Citation: You W, Henneberg M (2016) Meat in Modern Diet, Just as Bad as Sugar, Correlates to Worldwide Obesity: An Ecological Analysis . J Nutr Food Sci 6:517. doi:10.4172/2155-9600.1000517 Copyright: 2016 You W, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use,distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: The public have been educated that sugar intake should be minimized to avoid obesity, but no such recommendation regarding meat exists. We used FAO published comparable sugar and meat availability data to examine if they both contribute to obesity prevalence to the same extent. Methods: Country-specific Body Mass Index (BMI) estimates of obesity and overweight were obtained. These were matched with country-specific per capita per day availability of major food groups (meat, sugar, starch crops, fibers, fats and fruits), total calories, per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP PPP), urbanization and physical inactivity prevalence. Fishers r-to-z transformation and Beta (B) range (B 2 Standard Errors) overlapping were used to test for potential differences between correlations and regressions results respectively. SPSS 22.0 was used for log-transformed data analysis. Results: Pearson correlation showed that sugar and meat availability significantly correlated with obesity prevalence to the same extent (r=0.715, p<0.001 and r=0.685, p<0.001 respectively). These relationships remained in partial correlation analysis (r=0.359, p<0.001 and r=0.354, p<0.001 respectively) when controlling f Continue reading >>

New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass

New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass

New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass : The Salt An advisory panel had recommended telling Americans to cut back on red and processed meats. But that controversial advice is missing from the update to the government's official nutrition guidelines. New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass New Dietary Guidelines Crack Down On Sugar. But Red Meat Gets A Pass Eat This, Not That: The U.S. government's latest Dietary Guidelines call on Americans to eat more vegetables and fruits, more seafood and whole grains, and to cool it on foods high in sugar, refined grains, sodium and saturated fats. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption Eat This, Not That: The U.S. government's latest Dietary Guidelines call on Americans to eat more vegetables and fruits, more seafood and whole grains, and to cool it on foods high in sugar, refined grains, sodium and saturated fats. And today comes the official advice from the U.S. government: The Obama administration has released its much-anticipated update to the Dietary Guidelines . The guidelines, which are revised every five years, are based on evolving nutrition science and serve as the government's official advice on what to eat. One concrete change: Americans are being told to limit sugar to no more than 10 percent of daily calories. As we've reported, lots of Americans consume up to 22 teaspoons a day . To meet the new 10 percent target, they'd need to cut their sugar intake by nearly half to no more than 12 teaspoons a day on a 2,000-calorie daily diet. These two muffins each contain 35 grams (about 8 teaspoons) of sugar. Add in a cup of sweetened blueberry Greek yogurt (18 grams, or about 4 teaspoons, of sugar) and you' Continue reading >>

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