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Is There Any Cure For Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

Neuropathy

Neuropathy

A A A Neuropathy What Causes Neuropathy? What Are the Symptoms of Neuropathy? What is Neuropathy Treatment? Are There Home Remedies for Neuropathy? What Medications Are Used to Treat Neuropathy? What Are Neuropathy Medications? Neuropathy is a term that refers to general diseases or malfunctions of the nerves. Nerves at any location in the body can be damaged from injury or disease. Neuropathy is often classified according to the types or location of nerves that are affected. Neuropathy can also be classified according to the disease causing it. (For example, neuropathy from the effects of diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy.) Peripheral neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is when the nerve problem affects the nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord. These nerves are part of the peripheral nervous system. Accordingly, peripheral neuropathy is neuropathy that affects the nerves of the extremities- the toes, feet, legs, fingers, hands, and arms. The term proximal neuropathy has been used to refer to nerve damage that specifically causes pain in the shoulders, thighs, hips, or buttocks. Cranial neuropathy: Cranial neuropathy occurs when any of the twelve cranial nerves (nerves that exit from the brain directly) are damaged. Two specific types of cranial neuropathy are optic neuropathy and auditory neuropathy. Optic neuropathy refers to damage or disease of the optic nerve that transmits visual signals from the retina of the eye to the brain. Auditory neuropathy involves the nerve that carries signals from the inner ear to the brain and is responsible for hearing. Autonomic neuropathy: Autonomic neuropathy is damage to the nerves of the involuntary nervous system. These nerves that control the heart and circulation (including blood pressure), digestion, bowel and bladd Continue reading >>

Experimental Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy Blocks Pain

Experimental Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy Blocks Pain

Experimental Treatment for Diabetic Neuropathy Blocks Pain Ointment shows promise preventing neuropathy. Depleting the chemical GM3 was found to prevent the development of neuropathy in obese mice with diabetes in a recent study. Its estimated that about 25% of patients with type 2 diabetes suffer from numbness and extreme nerve pain in their feet . With few treatment options available for patients suffering from neuropathy, new findings from a study published in Molecular Pain could potentially prevent, or reverse diabetic neuropathy. We have such terrible treatments right now for the neuropathy of diabetes, said corresponding study author Amy Paller. Were basically only treating the pain. This is a novel pathogenesis-based approach that looks at whats causing the neuropathy and reverses that instead of just treating the pain. During the study, researchers applied a gene therapy ointment to the footpad of diabetic mice to deplete GM3 and GM3 synthase, the enzyme that makes GM3. The authors noted that this type of neuropathy goes beyond the typical numbness that some patients with this condition experience. Its not that you just dont have sensation in your feet, said first study author Daniela Menichella. You have shooting pain, which is the unbearable part. Pain is a debilitating affliction and one of the worst complications of diabetes. Prior to this treatment, researchers discovered that routine diabetic mice had significantly more GM3 and GM3 synthase in their nerves compared with normal mice. These same findings were seen in the skin of both humans and mice with diabetes. Next, researchers compared the function and appearance of the nerves in mice, which had GM3 depleted by genetic manipulation. In routine diabetic mouse skin, the nerves were found to have virtual Continue reading >>

Quell, A New Treatment For Neuropathy Without Drugs

Quell, A New Treatment For Neuropathy Without Drugs

For security supervisor Jesse Alberio, the pain from his diabetic neuropathy grew so bad he thought he might not be able to work any longer. “It affected both of my feet,” says Alberio, 52, a type 2 diabetic for almost a decade. “I tried aspirin, and ibuprofen, and other pain killers, but nothing was working. The pain was intense. It was like my toes were constantly being crushed. I thought I’d have to retire from my job.” Alberio is one of almost half of all type 1 and type 2 diabetics, who number almost 177 million worldwide and 30 million in the United States, suffering from some degree of painful diabetic neuropathy, which is damage to the peripheral nerves in the body as a result of prolonged hyperglycemia. A visit to his podiatrist’s office, however, provided Alberio with an option other than being zonked out on pain medication and retiring early. “My foot doctor wanted me to try this device,” Alberio says. “It was this thing that looked like it had electric shocks. I was skeptical.” What Alberio was dubious about was a wearable device called Quell from a company called NeuroMetrix, Inc, designed to alleviate chronic pain, According to NeuroMetrix, Quell is a wearable intensive nerve stimulation device that stimulates sensory nerves in the upper calf sending neural pulses to the brain. This triggers the release of endogenous opioids into the spine where pain signals are blocked in the body, which thereby delivers widespread pain relief. While it works along the same pathways as other pain-relieving, drug-based opioids, the dangerous side effects of such pain relief, such as addiction and artificial euphoria, are avoided because endogenous opioids (which are naturally occurring in the body) are targeted to only relieve pain. The electronics of t Continue reading >>

Neuropathy (diabetic)

Neuropathy (diabetic)

Dietary And Lifestyle Considerations Dietary and lifestyle modifications are essential for people with diabetic neuropathy because they can help prevent the disease from progressing further. One of the most important ways that diabetics can slow the progression of their neuropathy is to achieve better control of their blood glucose levels (Skyler 1996; Callaghan 2012a). It is in this goal that dietary and lifestyle changes can be most effective. In addition to the strategies outlined in this protocol, readers are encouraged to review the Diabetes and Weight Loss protocols. Diet Diet is one of the main ways that people with diabetes can control their blood glucose levels without taking additional medication. Eating well-balanced meals, with a mixture of fruits, vegetables, proteins, and fats will help prevent major swings in blood glucose levels. Eating meals on a regular schedule and coordinating meals with diabetes medications will also minimize blood glucose fluctuations (Mayo Clinic 2011). In addition, specific dietary patterns, such as high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets (Gannon 2004) or diets rich in foods with a low glycemic index (Rizkalla 2004) have been shown to improve blood glucose control. A healthy diet will also help diabetics lose weight, which has been shown to help keep blood glucose levels low (Wing 1987). Notably, a study found that making dietary changes to help keep blood glucose levels under control reduced diabetic neuropathy symptoms in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, which is considered to be a pre-diabetic condition (Smith 2006). Ideally, most people should target a fasting blood glucose level between 70 and 85 mg/dL, although this may be difficult for diabetics to achieve. Exercise Regular exercise is also important for people with Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page

Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke The NINDS conducts and supports research on diabetic neuropathy to increase understanding of the disorder and find ways to prevent and cure it. New medications are currently being examined to assess improvement or stabilization of neuropathic symptoms. Information from the National Library of Medicines MedlinePlus The NINDS conducts and supports research on diabetic neuropathy to increase understanding of the disorder and find ways to prevent and cure it. New medications are currently being examined to assess improvement or stabilization of neuropathic symptoms. Information from the National Library of Medicines MedlinePlus The NINDS conducts and supports research on diabetic neuropathy to increase understanding of the disorder and find ways to prevent and cure it. New medications are currently being examined to assess improvement or stabilization of neuropathic symptoms. Information from the National Library of Medicines MedlinePlus Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused by diabetes or poor blood sugar control. The most common types of diabetic neuropathy result in problems with sensation in the feet. It can develop slowly after many years of diabetes or may occur early in the disease. The symptoms are numbness, pain, or tingling in the feet or lower legs. The pain can be intense and require treatment to relieve the discomfort. The loss of sensation in the feet may also increase the possibility that foot injuries will go unnoticed and develop into ulcers or lesions that become infected. In some cases, diabetic neuropathy can be associated with difficulty walking and some weakness in the foot muscles. There are other types of diabetic-related neuropathies that affect specific parts of the body. Continue reading >>

Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update

Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update

Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient's goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) occurs in approximately 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are hospitalized and in 25% of patients with diabetes who are treated in the office setting.1 It develops as a late manifestation of uncontrolled or long-standing diabetes.1 As many as 12% of patients with painful DPN do not report symptoms, and 39% of patients with the disorder do not receive any Continue reading >>

Treating Peripheral Neuropathy With Stem Cells

Treating Peripheral Neuropathy With Stem Cells

Stem cells are special cells in our bodies that have two important characteristics: Stem cells have the ability to replicate. In other words, they can make new copies of themselves. Because of this ability, an infinite number of copies can be made from the same cell. Stem cells also have the ability to become other types of cells. A good example of this is that research labs have used fat-derived stem cells to make cartilage muscle, skin, and bone cells. This ability means that in theory the transformed can make an infinite number of the new cell type. Stem cells can come from a number of sources including embryos, umbilical cord blood and adult cells. Adult stem cells come from adult individuals, not embryos or umbilical cord blood. Stem cells obtained from mature adult tissues are referred to as adult stem cells. Adult stem cells are believed to have the potential to become any type of cell. The two most commonly used sources of adult stem cells are fat and bone marrow. Adult stem cells from fat are called adipose-derived adult stem cells. For most purposes, stem cells from fat are easier to obtain and more abundant than from other tissues. For more information on stem cells visit: How are adult stem cells harvested from fat? Harvesting adult stem cells from fat is very safe. The procedure has little discomfort and fairly easy recovery. First, an area such as the stomach or leg is picked to remove the fat. We then take you to the procedure room and sterilize the area. A local anesthetic is then injected into the area. Fat is suctioned using special syringe and cannula. Typically we suction about 50 ml (about 1 1.2 oz.) of fat. Swelling and bruising is common following the procedure at the harvest site. Swelling and bruising typically resolves within 2-3 weeks after t Continue reading >>

Do You Want To Know What Causes The Nerve Damage And Thus Diabetic Nerve Pain?

Do You Want To Know What Causes The Nerve Damage And Thus Diabetic Nerve Pain?

Visit our Health Index for More Subjects, Conditions and Answers Causes and Treatment of Diabetic Nerve Pain - Neuropathy Give me a longer explanation for all types of neuropathy Diabetic nerve damage and the pain are caused by too much sugar in the blood. The sugar hurts the nerve cell's outer sheath (the protective outer cover). Peripheral nerve cells have three main parts: cell body, axons, and dendrites (or terminal). (See diagram below) Nerve damage occurs when the outer sheathing or the myelin (protective covering) of nerve cells degenerate. This is similar to an electrical wire that is covered with insulation, and the insulation is beginning to crumble. Without insulation the unprotected wire will start short-circuiting. This short-circuiting will cause all the unpleasant and painful sensations that people who are suffering from nerve pain go through. When the nerve damage continues to deteriorate, the nerve does not relay the nerve impulses and the sensation of numbness will occur. Diabetics will suffer from this nerve pain and it is a major complication of the disease. It is the higher than normal sugar levels that creates the damage which is why controlling blood sugar is so important. It is an acquired disease. Neuropathy Symptoms: The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on the type of nerves — motor, sensory, or autonomic — that is damaged. Some people may experience numbness, tingling, and pricking sensations, sensitivity to touch, or muscle weakness. It is the cause of numbness in the fingers and even left arm pain and tingling. Others may suffer more extreme symptoms, including burning pain (especially at night), shooting pain, muscle wasting, paralysis, or organ or gland dysfunction. Small fiber neuropathy affects the nerve endings in the fingers Continue reading >>

Laser Therapy For Diabetic Neuropathy

Laser Therapy For Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage caused by diabetes. If you have had diabetes for many years, especially if your glucose has been hard to control, you may get symptoms of neuropathy like tingling, burning, and numbness. Up to 70% of people with diabetes will experience this problem. Diabetic nerve damage often occurs when your nerves are exposed to high blood sugar, decreased blood supply, and inflammation. The most common type of diabetic neuropathy is peripheral neuropathy, which is damage to the long sensory nerves that travel farthest away from your spinal cord. You are most likely to feel symptoms in your feet, especially in your toes and on the soles of your feet. The condition may also affect your hands, arms, and legs. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are the most common and bothersome symptoms that most diabetics experience. The burning and tingling tends to be worse at night and can make it hard to sleep. Your doctor can treat diabetic neuropathy, but cant cure it. Optimal control of blood sugar levels is the first step. You can also take drugs that relieve pain, but these treatments are only 40% to 60% successful. Laser therapy is another choice. If you have diabetic foot neuropathy, good shoes might save your feet! How Does Laser Therapy for Neuropathy Work? Laser therapy for neuropathy was started in Europe and Russia in the 1960s. This type of laser therapy is called low-level laser therapy, because it is done at low intensity. It doesnt cause tissue burning or destruction, and its painless. Your doctor simply holds the laser device over the area of your body where you feel pain, and low levels of laser energy pass through your skin. Treatments may last about five to 15 minutes and may be repeated two to three times a week for several weeks. Scien Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

[Editor’s note: In recognition of American Diabetes Month, Harvard Health Publications is collaborating with MSN.com on its Stop Diabetes initiative. Today’s post, published on World Diabetes Day, is the first of several focusing on this all-too-common disorder.] People tend to think of diabetes as a silent, painless condition. Don’t tell that to the millions of folks with diabetes-induced tingling toes or painful feet. This problem, called diabetic neuropathy, can range from merely aggravating to disabling or even life threatening. It’s something I have first-hand (or, more appropriately, first-foot) knowledge about. High blood sugar, the hallmark of diabetes, injures nerves and blood vessels throughout the body. The first nerves to be affected tend to be the smallest ones furthest from the spinal cord—those that stretch to the toes and feet. Diabetic neuropathy affects different people in different ways. I feel it as a tingling in my toes. Moving my feet and wiggling my toes helps the tingling disappear for a while. Others have it much worse. Diabetic neuropathy can cause a constant burning feeling in the feet; sharp pain that may be worse at night; and extreme sensitivity to touch, making the weight of a sheet unbearable. It can be sneaky, too, and completely rob the feet of their ability to sense pain. The truly scary thing about diabetic neuropathy is a 10-letter word we usually associate with horrific accidents or Civil War battlefields—amputation. When sensory nerves in the feet become damaged, a blister, cut, or sore can go unnoticed, allowing time for the wound to become infected. Infections that cause tissue to die (gangrene) and that spread to the bone may be impossible to treat with cleansing and antibiotics. Diabetes accounts for about 70,000 lo Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a serious and common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It’s a type of nerve damage caused by uncontrolled high blood sugar levels. You may not initially have any symptoms. The condition usually develops slowly, sometimes over the course of several decades. If you have diabetes and are experiencing numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of your hands or feet, call your doctor. These are the early symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. In cases of severe or prolonged peripheral neuropathy, you may experience injuries or infections in your extremities. In some cases, these can lead to amputation. Damage to other nerves of the body can cause other symptoms. That’s why it’s important to regularly monitor your blood sugar levels and contact your doctor if have any symptoms of neuropathy. It’s common for symptoms of neuropathy to appear gradually. In many cases, the first type of nerve damage to occur involves the nerves of the feet. This can lead to symptoms such as the sensation of pins and needles in your feet. Symptoms vary depending on the nerves affected. Common signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include: sensitivity to touch loss of sense of touch difficulty with coordination when walking numbness or pain in your extremities muscle weakness or wasting nausea and indigestion diarrhea or constipation dizziness upon standing excessive sweating vaginal dryness in women and erectile dysfunction in men Symptoms may vary depending on the type of neuropathy you’re experiencing. The term neuropathy is used to describe several types of nerve damage. In people with diabetes, there are four main types of neuropathy you may develop. Peripheral neuropathy The most common form of neuropathy is peripheral neuropa Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetic Neuropathy (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Diabetic Neuropathy (beyond The Basics)

DIABETIC NEUROPATHY OVERVIEW Neuropathy is the medical term for nerve damage. Neuropathy is a common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes; up to 26 percent of people with type 2 diabetes have evidence of nerve damage at the time that diabetes is diagnosed [1]. A generalized type of neuropathy, known as polyneuropathy, is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy. Other types of neuropathy can also affect people with diabetes, but will not be discussed here. Signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include loss of sensation and/or burning pain in the feet. Early detection of diabetes and tight control of blood sugar levels may reduce the risk of developing diabetic neuropathy. Treatments for diabetic neuropathy are available, and include several elements: control of blood glucose levels, prevention of injury, and control of painful symptoms. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY RISK FACTORS In people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the biggest risk factor for developing diabetic neuropathy is having high blood sugar levels over time. Other factors can further increase the risk of developing diabetic neuropathy, including: Coronary artery disease Increased triglyceride levels Smoking High blood pressure DIABETIC NEUROPATHY SYMPTOMS The most common symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include pain, burning, tingling, or numbness in the toes or feet, and extreme sensitivity to light touch. The pain may be worst at rest and improve with activity, such as walking. Some people initially have intensely painful feet while others have few or no symptoms. Diabetic neuropathy usually affects both sides of the body. Symptoms are usually noticed first in the toes. If the disease progresses, symptoms may gradually move up the legs; if the mid-calves are affected, symptoms may develop in the hands. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Treatment & Management

Diabetic Neuropathy Treatment & Management

LYRICA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to pregabalin or any of its other components. Angioedema and hypersensitivity reactions have occurred in patients receiving pregabalin therapy. There have been postmarketing reports of hypersensitivity in patients shortly after initiation of treatment with LYRICA. Adverse reactions included skin redness, blisters, hives, rash, dyspnea, and wheezing. Discontinue LYRICA immediately in patients with these symptoms. There have been postmarketing reports of angioedema in patients during initial and chronic treatment with LYRICA. Specific symptoms included swelling of the face, mouth (tongue, lips, and gums), and neck (throat and larynx). There were reports of life-threatening angioedema with respiratory compromise requiring emergency treatment. Discontinue LYRICA immediately in patients with these symptoms. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including LYRICA increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in patients taking AEDs for any indication. Monitor patients treated with any AED for any indication for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior, and/or any unusual changes in mood or behavior. Pooled analyses showed clinical trial patients taking an AED had approximately twice the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior than placebo-treated patients. The estimated incidence rate of suicidal behavior or ideation among 27,863 AED-treated patients was 0.43%, compared to 0.24% among 16,029 placebo-treated patients, representing an increase of approximately one patient for every 530 patients treated with an AED. The most common adverse reactions across all LYRICA clinical trials are dizziness, somnolence, dry mouth, edema, blurred vision, weight gain, constipation, euphoric mood, balance Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

COULD I HAVE DIABETIC NEUROPATHY? If you have diabetes and feel numbness or tingling in your feet, that could mean you suffer from what’s called diabetic neuropathy. Keep reading to learn more about the causes and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy from the experts at FootSmart. WHAT IS DIABETIC NEUROPATHY? While many people know that diabetes affects blood sugar levels, it may also cause nerve damage in a pattern that first affects the hands and feet. That damage to the nervous system is called diabetic neuropathy, and it can have direct consequences on your feet. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy may not appear until many years after your diabetes is diagnosed. High blood sugar levels—also called hyperglycemia—can injure the walls of the blood vessels that nourish your nerves and result in nerve damage. That’s why controlling your blood sugar levels with the right medication, diet, and exercise is essential in helping prevent diabetic neuropathy. That nerve damage may result in painful tingling or burning sensations in your feet and legs. But even worse is when you experience decreased protective sensation in your feet—a condition called "peripheral neuropathy" where you become unaware of pressure, pain, heat, and cold. For example, if you develop calluses, fissures, and wounds in your feet without noticing them, your risk of foot and leg infections increases. In addition, motor nerves—the nerves that control your muscles—can be affected as diabetic neuropathy progresses. Combined with the decreased protective sensation, repetitive microtrauma (a series of small, unnoticed injuries) may result in joint damage to your feet and worsen over time. In severe cases, this condition may even lead to foot deformity, which doctors call Charcot neuroarthropathy. Think y Continue reading >>

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