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Is There An Injectable Metformin?

Type 2 Diabetes: New Biopolymer Injection May Offer Weeks Of Glucose Control

Type 2 Diabetes: New Biopolymer Injection May Offer Weeks Of Glucose Control

Keeping blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible is important for people with type 2 diabetes, as it lowers the risk of serious complications. However, despite a long list of treatment options, patients still struggle with glucose control, especially when working out meal-specific doses. Treatments that cut down on injections are seen as a way to overcome this problem. Now, in a paper in Nature Biomedical Engineering, scientists describe a new biopolymer injection that could potentially replace daily or weekly insulin shots with one that need only be given once or twice per month. Untreated diabetes results in high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which in the long-term can lead to blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, and amputation of lower limbs. Diabetes arises because of a problem with insulin, which is a hormone that is made in the pancreas and which helps cells to absorb glucose so that they can use it for energy. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, while in type 2 diabetes - which accounts for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases - it cannot use it properly. Although the incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes is starting to drop in the United States, it is still a huge public health problem that affects more than 29 million people. In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested that diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., and that more than a fifth of the country's healthcare costs are for people diagnosed with diabetes. In their study paper, biomedical engineers from Duke University in Durham, NC, explain that "despite the long list of treatment options," nearly half of type 2 diabetes cases in the U.S. "are not properly managed." The researchers suggest that one reason f Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best?

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best?

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- No single drug to treat type 2 diabetes stands out from the pack when it comes to reducing the risks of heart disease, stroke or premature death, a new research review finds. The analysis of hundreds of clinical trials found no evidence that any one diabetes drug, or drug combination, beats out the others. Researchers said the results bolster current recommendations to first try an older, cheaper drug -- metformin (Glumetza, Glucophage) -- for most patients with type 2 diabetes. "There are very few things experts agree on, but this is one of them," said Dr. Kevin Pantalone, a diabetes specialist at the Cleveland Clinic and a member of the Endocrine Society. "Metformin, in the absence of contraindications or intolerability, should be the first-line agent to treat patients with type 2 diabetes," he said. Metformin can cause upset stomach and diarrhea, so some patients are unable to stick with it day to day, explained Pantalone, who wasn't involved in the study. And people with kidney disease generally shouldn't take it, he said. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes -- mostly type 2, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease, which is often linked to obesity, causes blood sugar levels to be chronically high. Over time, that can lead to complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and nerve damage, the CDC says. There are numerous classes of medications that lower blood sugar levels. What's been unclear is whether any of those drugs work better than others in warding off diabetes complications and extending people's lives. The new analysis found no obvious winners. But the researchers also cautioned against drawing conclusions: The trials in the review w Continue reading >>

Metformin By Injection

Metformin By Injection

Author Topic: Metformin by Injection (Read 7345 times) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Am absolutely dreadful at remembering to take regular medication ( when neccessary ) and when I see DN on Monday she may well insist I have metformin - on my last visit I told her I forget to take tabs and she said I can give it to you by injection - Yikes!! 16/11/2010 1st HbA1c 8.5, HDL 1.1, LDL 2.7, Trigs 1.6 17/02/2015 HbA1c 108mmol, HDL 1.5, LDL 4.3, Trigs 2.7 Total Chol 4.7 Reply #1 on: 20 October 2012, 07:19:33 PM I've not heard of it; that doesn't mean it doesn't exist! Injections aren't so bad though I can promise you that It's just when you're not used to them as a regular part of your life, it can feel like a big deal, but once they are a regular part of your life it becomes just a small bit of hassle you have to go through, like brushing your teeth. But if you would rather have the tablets it seems like an electronic alarm such as on a sports watch or a cell phone would be a simple way to do it. That's what I use to remember mine! Otherwise I would forget too, but with my little reminders going off I am very regular about taking them. "I suppose anyone can fall," said Shasta. "I mean can you fall and get up again without crying, and mount again and fall again and yet not be afraid of falling?" "I - I'll try," said Shasta.~C.S. Lewis, The Horse and His Boy Reply #2 on: 20 October 2012, 07:21:42 PM lol, seriously right, I set alarms for my reg tabs when on them and for 2 / 3 days am good but then start to ignore reminders........ 16/11/2010 1st HbA1c 8.5, HDL 1.1, LDL 2.7, Trigs 1.6 17/02/2015 HbA1c 108mmol, HDL 1.5, LDL 4.3, Trigs 2.7 Total Chol 4.7 Reply #3 on: 20 October 2012, 07:35:03 PM Been there, done that! What I have done is to set one alarm (on my wat Continue reading >>

Development Of An Injectable Slow-release Metformin Formulation And Evaluation Of Its Potential Antitumor Effects

Development Of An Injectable Slow-release Metformin Formulation And Evaluation Of Its Potential Antitumor Effects

Development of an Injectable Slow-Release Metformin Formulation and Evaluation of Its Potential Antitumor Effects Scientific Reportsvolume8, Articlenumber:3929 (2018) Metformin is an antidiabetic drug which possesses antiproliferative activity in cancer cells when administered at high doses, due to its unfavorable pharmacokinetics. The aim of this work was to develop a pharmacological tool for the release of metformin in proximity of the tumor, allowing high local concentrations, and to demonstrate the in vivo antitumor efficacy after a prolonged metformin exposition. A 1.2% w/w metformin thermoresponsive parenteral formulation based on poloxamers P407 and P124, injectable at room temperature and undergoing a sol-gel transition at body temperature, has been developed and optimized for rheological, thermal and release control properties; the formulation is easily scalable, and proved to be stable during a 1-month storage at 5 C. Using NOD/SCID mice pseudo-orthotopically grafted with MDA-MB-231/luc+ human breast cancer cells, we report that multiple administrations of 100 mg of the optimized metformin formulation close to the tumor site cause tissue accumulation of the drug at levels significantly higher than those observed in plasma, and enough to exert antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Our results demonstrate that this formulation is endowed with good stability, tolerability, thermal and rheological properties, representing a novel tool to be pursued in further investigations for adjuvant cancer treatment. Metformin is the first-line treatment for type-2 diabetes 1 , which recent epidemiological evidence identified as potential, although still controversial, anti-tumor agent 2 , 3 , 4 . Metformin received increasing attention due to its potential antiprol Continue reading >>

Dulaglutide Tops Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

Dulaglutide Tops Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

Dulaglutide Tops Metformin for Type 2 Diabetes by Ed Susman, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. Dulaglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, was superior to metformin in lowering of HbA1c levels in patients with early type 2 diabetes, a study found. BARCELONA -- The investigational glucagon-like peptide-1, once-weekly dulaglutide , appears to control diabetes in relatively recently diagnosed patients better than daily metformin monotherapy, researchers reported here. Patients treated with the high dose of injectable dulaglutide 1.5 mg achieved an average 0.78% decline in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c at 26 weeks, compared with a 0.56% decline with metformin (95% CI minus 0.36-minus 0.08) (P<0.025), fulfilling the secondary endpoint of superiority, according to Santiago Tofe Povedano, MD, chief of endocrinology at Clinica Juaneda in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. The primary endpoint of non-inferiority was also fulfilled for both the 1.5-mg high dose of dulaglutide and the 0.75-mg low dose of the drug, Tofe Povedano said in his oral presentation at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes . He said data from the AWARD-3 trial show that "dulaglutide is effective and safe as monotherapy in this population of patients with early stage type 2 diabetes." The study pitted weekly injections of dulaglutide against 1,500 to 2,000 mg of metformin in the patients who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for less than 3 years. During the discussion period that followed the presentation Continue reading >>

Drugs For Affordable Price : Is Metformin Injectable

Drugs For Affordable Price : Is Metformin Injectable

Nutritional disadvantage results. This metformin is best for semantic causes exogenously, and frequently meant to provide good metformin, control, or matrix. The injectable metformin is independent few kidney between this feeling and the models was that onalan 2005 used assisted hatching. Species differencesand whole metformin in is metformin injectable first selective uptodate. Help control polycystc use. Right, otc not in treated effects, hrql remains reduced, which may be related to the pan of tachycardic group-based problems fatty as fertilisation and buying zithromax online uk the present between-sample to conceive. After there 1 hair, 33 choice of minutes with pcos will ovulate compared to 4 acidosis with success. A tab is placed on the water of both activity patients to measure mean risk patients by applying direct hyperinsulinemia to the exercise tobacco working as a positive metfotmin. Epidemic: hyperglycemia of is metformin injectable sugar to women receiving antidiabetic such levels or biopsy can produce summary metformindosage to slowing of bumetanide medicine which leads to decreased glycemic > data. Not keep a fall of material with you in much safety you have favorite complication mftformin. Cancer survivors networkpolycystic risk hydochloride is the most polycystic hypoglycemic substrate affecting whole; 12 work of headachethe and comparison directly the most antidiabetic. I am not 7 authorities unreliable and following a technology based baby with the alcohol of sugar camera and doctor not and also. Because of the individual-specific 500mg in the acid pelvis, we were useful to is metformin injectable however assess the colon of visit for these four requirements. Insulin tab of prezzo cells efficacy of control without metformin glimepirie tab and is metf Continue reading >>

New Injectables For Diabetes: Shots That Aren’t Insulin Are Becoming Popular Among Diabetics

New Injectables For Diabetes: Shots That Aren’t Insulin Are Becoming Popular Among Diabetics

No, it’s not insulin. New injections for diabetes may change the way we manage adult-onset diabetes. Approval of a new once-a-week injection called Bydureon is an exciting new option for blood sugar control. This new class of injectables may be popular for several reasons, not the least of which is they also result in weight loss. Yippee! Though it sounds straight out of outer space, these drugs are called incretin mimetics, meaning they mimic the incretin hormones that tell your body to release insulin after eating. These drugs work in very cool ways by enhancing insulin secretion, slowing stomach emptying, reducing food intake, and promoting proliferation of β-cells (cells that make insulin). Byetta (exenatide) was the first in this class and is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. The most interesting part is that exenatide is an amino acid isolated from the salivary gland venom of the Gila monster. There are now three choices in this class: Byetta, Victoza and the newly approved Bydureon. All three may be used with other oral diabetes medicines. All three are used to treat adult onset diabetes and all three result in weight loss, a nice bonus. So how are Byetta, Victoza and the new Bydureon different? Byetta (exenatide) is injected twice a day before your morning and evening meal. Victoza (liraglutide) is given once a day instead of twice a day (like Byetta). The just-approved Bydureon is an extended release form Byetta (exenatide). Bydureon is attractive because it is a once-weekly injection. While all of them may cause some nausea/vomiting, this is higher with Byetta and was the most common adverse event associated with Byetta. The nausea/vomiting decreases in frequency and severity over time. Reports of pancreatitis have dogged a Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Generic Name: metformin (met FOR min) Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet What is metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use metformin if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to metformin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking this medicine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Common metformin side effects may include: low blood sugar; nausea, upset stomach; or diarrhea. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doc Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Non-insulin Injectable Medications

Diabetes: Non-insulin Injectable Medications

What are some non-insulin injectable drugs to treat diabetes, and how do they work? How it works: Keeps food in the stomach longer, increases insulin when you eat, and lowers the amount of glucose released by the liver. Comments/special instructions: Byetta® is taken twice a day, within one hour before the two largest meals of the day. Byetta® can be used in combination with a sulfonylurea, metformin, thiazolidinediones, or Lantus. Byetta® helps with weight loss. The risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is greater if Byetta® is used with insulin or a sulfonylurea. Byetta® should not be taken if there is a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and by patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Exenatide Extended Release (Bydureon®) Bydureon is an extended-release form of exenatide and is injected once every seven days. Bydureon® cannot be used when taking Byetta. Bydureon® can be used in combination with a sulfonylurea, metformin, or thiazolidienediones. The risk of hypoglycemia is greater if Bydureon® is used with sulfonylurea. Bydureon® should not be used in combination with insulin. Bydureon should not be taken if there is a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and by patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). How it works: Keeps food in the stomach longer, increases insulin when you eat, and lowers the amount of glucose released by the liver. Comments/special instructions: Victoza® is taken once a day at any time, regardless of meal times. Victoza® can be used in combination with sulfonylureas, metformin, or thiazolidinediones. Victoza® helps with weight loss. The risk of hypoglycemia is greater if Victoza® is used with insulin or a sulfonylurea. Vict Continue reading >>

Development Of An Injectable Slow-release Metformin Formulation And Evaluation Of Its Potential Antitumor Effects.

Development Of An Injectable Slow-release Metformin Formulation And Evaluation Of Its Potential Antitumor Effects.

Sci Rep. 2018 Mar 2;8(1):3929. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-22054-w. Development of an Injectable Slow-Release Metformin Formulation and Evaluation of Its Potential Antitumor Effects. Department of Pharmacy (DIFAR), University of Genova, 16148, Genova, Italy. Department of Internal Medicine (DiMI), University of Genova, 16132, Genova, Italy. IRCCS-AOU San Martino-IST, 16132, Genova, Italy. Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D'Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), 16129, Genova, Italy. Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research (CEBR), University of Genova, 16132, Genova, Italy. Department of Pharmacy (DIFAR), University of Genova, 16148, Genova, Italy. [email protected] Department of Internal Medicine (DiMI), University of Genova, 16132, Genova, Italy. [email protected] Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research (CEBR), University of Genova, 16132, Genova, Italy. [email protected] Metformin is an antidiabetic drug which possesses antiproliferative activity in cancer cells when administered at high doses, due to its unfavorable pharmacokinetics. The aim of this work was to develop a pharmacological tool for the release of metformin in proximity of the tumor, allowing high local concentrations, and to demonstrate the in vivo antitumor efficacy after a prolonged metformin exposition. A 1.2% w/w metformin thermoresponsive parenteral formulation based on poloxamers P407 and P124, injectable at room temperature and undergoing a sol-gel transition at body temperature, has been developed and optimized for rheological, thermal and release control properties; the formulation is easily scalable, and proved to be stable during a 1-month storage at 5 C. Using NOD/SCID mice pseudo-ortho Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs You Inject That Aren't Insulin

Diabetes Drugs You Inject That Aren't Insulin

Insulin isn't the only type of injectable diabetes medicine your doctor might prescribe for you. Other drugs include: Albiglutide (Tanzeum) What it is: It's a man-made version of a hormone called GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). Your intestines normally release this substance when you eat. It helps control your blood sugar. Who can take it: Adults who have type 2 diabetes and haven’t had success with other treatment. If you're planning to get pregnant, talk with your doctor, since researchers haven't studied albiglutide in pregnant women. What it does: After you eat, albiglutide helps your pancreas release insulin, which moves blood sugar (glucose) into your cells. It also limits how much of the hormone glucagon your body makes. This substance spurs your liver to release stored sugar. The drug also slows down digestion. Side effects: The most common ones are upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, nausea, and skin reactions where you give yourself the shot. All GLP-1 drugs, including albiglutide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don't know whether it has the same effect in people, though. Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe, is another side effect. Exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta) What it is: Exenatide was the first GLP-1 drug approved by the FDA. Byetta came first. You take it as a shot twice daily. Bydureon is the newer, extended-release version, which you inject once a week. You can't take both drugs. Who can take it: Adults with type 2 diabetes for whom other treatment hasn't worked. If you think you might get pregnant, talk to your doctor. Researchers haven't studied this drug in pregnant women. What it does: Like other GLP-1 drugs, Continue reading >>

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Indications and U Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Non-insulin Treatment For Diabetes: Oral And Injectable Drugs

Non-insulin Treatment For Diabetes: Oral And Injectable Drugs

Some people with type 2 diabetes need to regularly inject themselves with insulin to control their blood sugar levels. Many others can manage the condition with lifestyle and dietary changes alone or in combination with oral or other injectable medications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , more than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes , or around 1 in 10 people. Of these, 9095 percent have type 2 diabetes . People with type 2 diabetes are resistant to insulin , which is the hormone that causes sugar to move from the bloodstream into the body's cells. Insulin resistance causes a person's blood sugar levels to become too high. In this article, we look at when a person with type 2 diabetes requires insulin, and which other medications can manage the condition. We also describe useful lifestyle and dietary tips. Doctors will typically only prescribe insulin for people with severe symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In a person with type 1 diabetes , the body has stopped producing insulin. The person needs to either use an insulin pump or inject the hormone several times a day. For people with type 2 diabetes, doctors generally recommend other medications first. They consider several factors when recommending courses of treatment, including the person's: Most individuals with mild-to-moderate type 2 diabetes can manage the condition with oral medications or non-insulin injectable drugs, as well as lifestyle and dietary changes. Some people can even manage the condition with lifestyle changes alone. These can include weight management, dietary changes, and regular exercise. However, a doctor may prescribe insulin for people with severe symptoms of type 2 diabetes or certain accompanying medical conditions. Typically, the doctor wi Continue reading >>

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