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Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

The Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Many people are unaware that there is a very strong link between heart disease and diabetes. The American Heart Association says that 68 percent of people with diabetes die from a heart related condition. In fact, if your parent has diabetes, they are two to four times more likely to die from a heart condition than those without diabetes. Increased awareness of the link between heart disease and diabetes could help you and your senior parent to take better care of their heart by taking care of their diabetes symptoms. Diabetic Heart Disease. Sometimes doctors refer to a heart condition that occurs in a diabetic patient as diabetic heart disease (DHD). The term covers a host of heart conditions that occur in people with diabetes, such as: Heart Failure: Heart failure is a condition in which the heart does not pump a sufficient amount of blood through the body. Heart failure can cause a person to feel tired and lacking energy. Coronary Heart Disease: Coronary heart disease (sometimes called coronary artery disease), happens when plaque builds up on the walls of coronary arteries. When this happens, the blood flow to the heart is restricted, resulting in chest pain, an irregular heartbeat, heart attack, or death. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Diabetic cardiomyopathy affects the structure of the heart and the way that it works, causing heart failure or an irregular heartbeat. Reasons for Increased Risk. Even when a person’s diabetic symptoms are kept under control, they are still at a higher risk for heart disease. This is because people with diabetes, especially type 2, often have some of these other conditions in addition to diabetes: Unhealthy Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels: People with diabetes often simultaneously have low good cholesterol, high bad cholesterol, and Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The diabetes–heart disease connection and what it means for you Understand the interactions between these two conditions. Photo: Thinkstock Exercise and a heart-healty diet lowers risks from both heart disease and diabetes. Decades ago, data from the historic Framingham Heart Study revealed that having diabetes significantly increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In the intervening years, scientists have learned more about how the two deadly diseases interact. But the magnitude of the problem has expanded as well. Currently, two-thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of heart disease or stroke. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.1 People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.2 The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Smoking Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as lung disease. Smoking also can damage the blood vessels in your legs and increase the risk of lower leg infections, ulcers, a Continue reading >>

The Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

Insulin is a hormone that plays a crucial role in metabolizing glucose, or sugar. When a person has type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or does not use insulin effectively. Over time, this causes an increase of glucose in the blood, which interferes with the normal functioning and repair of cells throughout the body. The end result is cellular damage to vital tissues, organs and systems. One of the systems frequently damaged by this buildup of blood glucose is the cardiovascular system, including the heart. Diabetes is considered a serious risk factor for both developing heart disease and dying from heart disease. People with type 2 diabetes also develop heart disease at a younger age, have heart disease that is more severe, have more complications from heart disease and are more likely to have asymptomatic, or “silent,” heart disease. Healthcare providers sometimes refer to heart disease in patients with type 2 diabetes as “diabetic heart disease” or DHD. Why are people with type 2 diabetes at greater risk for heart disease? There is a well-documented association between type 2 diabetes and multiple forms of cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral artery disease, heart failure and cardiomyopathy. Some of the ways in which diabetes has been shown to damage the cardiovascular system include: Atherosclerosis, or the buildup of arterial plaque, that results from the damage to blood vessels and excess of lipids in the blood. This leads to coronary artery disease (plaque collected on the arteries supplying the heart) and peripheral artery disease (plaque collected in the arteries of the limbs). Kidney problems, which cause a buildup of fluid in the body; excess fluid can cause chronic high blood pressure, whic Continue reading >>

Do Bad Teeth Cause Diabetes, And Strokes?

Do Bad Teeth Cause Diabetes, And Strokes?

Gum and periodontal disease are associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease and it would seem reasonable to assume there's a similar relationship to ischaemic stroke but it is not clear if this is a causal association or sharing of causative factors Strength of Evidence Relating Periodontal Disease and Atherosclerotic Disease . I am not aware of a link between TOOTH decay on its own and IHD or diabetes. Diabetes is undoubtedly a risk factor for periodontal disease. There is some evidence that there is a reciprocal relationship but this is not clear and I suspect is not causal, i.e. periodontal disease will not increase the risk of developing diabetes but if you do, you may get more severe complication via sepsis. Diabetes and periodontitis Diabetes from bad teeth is possible due to something known as insulin resistance. Due to which blood glucose are not allowed to enter the cell n get metabolized. They are on in the blood stream causing diabetes. If you already have diabetes it may worsen the condition. What diabetes does is it makes the arteries thinner(in long term cases) so the blood supply to those areas decreses which leads to delayed healing n it also helps the oppopportunistic infections to grow more n more. But if you have bad tooth,tooth with caries, teeth with periodontal problems there's a chance that it may cause stroke/myocardial ischemia/thrombogenesis. Hope that helps! Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than nondiabetic people, and at least 65% of these patients will die from their heart disease. The most important advice for the diabetic patient is to control modifiable risk factors for heart disease with the following actions: Stop smoking. Lower your blood pressure. Control your weight. Exercise. Monitor your blood sugar levels. Diabetes doubles your risks for heart disease and stroke, according to the National Institutes of Health. Having diabetes also means you may develop these problems at a younger age. High blood sugar levels can lead to deposits of fat on the inside of blood vessel walls, increasing your chances of narrowed, hardened and/or clogged blood vessels. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor about the best ways to lower your risks for heart disease. Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

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Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, but the number-one cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is actually heart disease. Heart disease and diabetes often occur together, and the link between them is high blood sugar. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In fact, the CDC reports heart disease is responsible for one of every four deaths. For this reason, it’s essential for anyone with type 2 diabetes to understand the link between heart disease and diabetes and take proper preventative measures to manage or reverse their diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you probably already know about insulin resistance. Because the body does not use insulin properly, the pancreas tries to compensate by making extra insulin. Over time, it can’t keep up, and the body cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels. (Find out more information about insulin resistance here.) Those high glucose levels can harden arteries over time. Your arteries need to be spacious and flexible to get proper blood and oxygen circulation throughout the body; tight and rigid arteries force the heart to work harder to pump the blood around. This leads to heart disease. Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes may follow certain lifestyles that can trigger heart disease. The same diet and habits that lead to type 2 diabetes can also lead to heart disease because of their connection to high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And it doesn’t stop there: Those same problems can lead to other conditions, such as erectile dysfunction or stroke. The good news: Both type 2 diabetes and heart disease can be prevented or managed by lifestyle choices. Lean proteins and heart-healthy meals can help keep cholesterol levels low, and ample research supports eating a vegetarian Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Online Health Chat with Dr. Leslie Cho and Dr. Vinni Makin Introduction Cleveland_Clinic_Host: People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease at some point in their lives. It is important to control risk factors early on. Join cardiologist Leslie Cho, MD, and endocrinologist, Vinni Makin, MD,online for answers to your questions concerning the link between diabetes and heart disease. Leslie Cho, MD,is Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Women’s Cardiovascular Center. She is also Section Head,Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Cho is board-certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular medicine, and internal medicine. Her specialty interests focus on general cardiology, heart disease, and peripheral arterial and vascular disease and their attendant therapies and treatments. Dr. Cho specializes in heart disease in women. A graduate of the University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine, Dr. Cho completed her residency in internal medicine at University of Washington Medical Center. She completed cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology fellowships at Cleveland Clinic. Vinni Makin, MD, is an endocrinologist in Cleveland Clinic’s Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute. She is board certified in endocrinology and internal medicine, and her specialty interests include general endocrinology, diabetes, hirsutism, acne, and thyroid disorders. A graduate of Delhi University’s Lady Hardinge Medical College, Dr. Makin completed her residency in internal medicine at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County in Chicago. She completed her endocrinology fellowship at Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland_Clinic_Host: Welcome to our Online Health Continue reading >>

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, an opportunity to recognize one of the most serious, complex and growing public health burdens worldwide – and its link to cardiovascular disease. In 2017, 425 million people worldwide have diabetes, and this number is expected to rise to 629 million by 2045 – meaning an astounding one in 10 adults will be living with the disease. In the U.S., diabetes impacts approximately 30 million people, and it was the seventh leading cause of death in 2015. Diabetes is a chronic and generally progressive disease that is characterized by high blood sugar levels, and without appropriate management, can lead to serious complications including kidney problems, blindness and amputation. In the U.S., about one third of adults with diabetes are not currently at their blood sugar goal, a reminder of the tremendous need for new therapeutic options to help those with diabetes to better manage their condition, as well as support and education to help them manage their treatment regimen. One of the biggest threats for people living with diabetes is cardiovascular disease. Diabetes itself is a risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, and its complications, including heart attack and stroke, remain the number one cause of death in people with diabetes. Furthermore, adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. Additional research in this area is critical in order to reduce this burden, advance patient care and improve outcomes. In our early discovery efforts, Pfizer is focused on emerging areas of research in metabolic disorders, including metabolic-related cardiovascular complications, energy balance in chronic disease, type 2 diabetes/hyperinsulinemia and non-alcoholic Continue reading >>

Biological Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Found

Biological Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Found

Researchers from the UC Davis Health System have discovered a biological link between diabetes and heart disease, which may explain why diabetes sufferers have an increased risk for heart disease. This is according to a study published in the journal Nature. The researchers found that when blood sugars are abnormally high (hyperglycemia), this activates a biological pathway that causes irregular heartbeats - a condition called cardiac arrhythmia - that is linked to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. According to the World Heart Federation, people who suffer from diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, compared with people who do not have diabetes. The American Heart Association says that around 65% of diabetes sufferers die from heart disease or stroke, emphasizing the need for new research looking at links between the conditions. For this study, UC Davis researchers, alongside collaborators at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted a series of experiments to determine any biological reasons as to why diabetes sufferers are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. O-GlcNAc-modified CaMKII a trigger of arrhythmias The experiments involved detailed molecular analysis in rat and human proteins and tissues, calcium imaging in isolated rat cardiac myocytes (cells found in muscle tissues) that were exposed to high glucose, as well looking at whole heart arrhythmias with optical mapping within isolated hearts and live diabetic rates. Their findings showed that moderate to high blood glucose levels, similar to those found in diabetics, triggered a sugar molecule called O-GlcNAc (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) in heart muscle cells to bind to a specific site on a protein called CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent pr Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

Many people with diabetes also have heart disease. When you do things to take care of your diabetes, like manage your blood sugar, exercise, and eat a healthy diet, that's also good for your heart. It's important to understand your risk and how you can lower it. Besides diabetes, do you also have: A waist that's larger than 35 inches in women or 40 inches in men? Low levels of "good" ( HDL) cholesterol? High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol or triglycerides (another type of fat in the blood)? Even borderline elevated at 130/85 If you're not sure, your doctor can check all those numbers for you. Also, do you: Smoke? Have a family member with heart disease? Your doctor needs that information to work with you on a plan for better heart health. People with diabetes are at risk for: Coronary artery disease. Your coronary arteries are in your heart. Fatty deposits, called plaques, can narrow them. If plaque suddenly breaks, it can cause a heart attack. Exercise, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking are musts. It could be from coronary artery disease or from the diabetes. It can be dangerous and fatal, so aggressive management and follow up is essential Congestive heart failure. This is an ongoing condition in which the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. The main symptoms are shortness of breath when you're moving and leg swelling. Many people have both conditions. If you smoke, it's time to quit. Set a date and talk to your doctor. If you've tried to quit before, it's not too late. Many people try several times before they kick the habit for good. Nearly everyone with diabetes can benefit from getting more exercise. It's good for your heart and helps control your blood sugar. Even brisk walking counts, so you don't need a gym. If you're not active now, let Continue reading >>

The 411 On Heart Disease + Diabetes

The 411 On Heart Disease + Diabetes

Last month, we launched a new series on diabetes complications. The idea is definitely not to use scare tactics to convince you to take better care of yourself, but rather to embrace the notion that "knowledge is power" and that if you are diagnosed with a complication, life goes on... (Hey, we're facing our own worst fears here, too) It just so happens that February is National Heart Month (go figure), so this month we're focusing on that nasty thing that can happen to your heart with diabetes: cardiovascular disease. Our expert help is Dr. Robert Eckel, an endocrinologist and past president of the American Health Association. Not only is he a professional expert, he's also had type 1 diabetes for the past 50 years! PWDs are two to four times more likely to suffer with cardiovascular disease, so listen up! Like retinopathy, there are several types of cardiovascular disease, with their own symptoms and treatments: 1. Coronary artery disease: This is the first type of heart disease and is caused by narrowing or blocking of the blood vessels that travel to your heart via fatty deposits. If the blood vessels to your heart become partially or totally blocked, then the blood supply is reduced or cut off. When that happens, a heart attack can occur. Coronary artery disease can cause a heart attack. During a heart attack, symptoms include: chest pain or discomfort pain or discomfort in your arms, back, jaw, neck, or stomach shortness of breath sweating nausea light-headedness Dr. Eckel points out that due to nerve damage from diabetes, a heart attack could be painless, and you might not even know if you've had one. Scary! If you have had a heart attack, your doctor may put you on a blood thinner, like aspirin, which can help reduce the chances of a second heart attack. 2. Hear Continue reading >>

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering: Nearly two-thirds of people with diabetes have high blood pressure, and, according to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than people who don't have the condition. The good news: Learning more about the link between heart disease and diabetes can help you take steps to help protect your heart and manage your diabetes. How Diabetes and Heart Disease Are Related The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. Over time, the high glucose in the bloodstream can damage the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels, a condition known as atherosclerosis. This can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Other heart facts to consider: People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. Heart disease that leads to heart attack or stroke is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. A person who has diabetes has the same risk of heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. Protecting Your Heart When You Have Diabetes If you believe you are at a higher risk for heart disease, don’t despair. There are several small lifestyle changes you can make to not only help prevent heart disease, but also manage your diabetes more effectively. Be active. The American Heart Association recomme Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

Ways for Diabetics to Protect Their Heart Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering regarding heart disease and the diabetes. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over time, high blood glucose levels damage nerves and blood vessels, leading to complications such as heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death among people with diabetes The Connection Between Heart Disease and Diabetes The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 65 percent of people with diabetes actually die of heart disease or stroke, and a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without diabetes. connection. DID YOU KNOW? A person with diabetes who has had one heart attack has a much greater risk of having another. A middle-aged person who has diabetes has the same chance of having a heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. People with diabetes who have heart attacks are more apt to die as a result. People with diabetes have a higher-than-average risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Continue reading >>

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