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Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Diabetes And Colon Cancer: An Emerging Link

Diabetes And Colon Cancer: An Emerging Link

More than 25 million adults aged 20 and older in the United States have diabetes. That figure has more than tripled since 1980. That is bad news for a number of reasons. Not only can diabetes cause heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and eye issues, but recent research now shows there is also a clear link between type 2 diabetes and colon cancer. Colon cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, yet it is still the third most common cancer among both men and women in the U.S. And, many of the ways people can lower their risk for colon cancer are actually the same as how they can avoid developing type 2 diabetes. These include: Staying away from a diet high in red and processed meats Keeping physically active Maintaining a healthy weight Staying away from tobacco Avoiding heavy alcohol use Even though the two diseases share several common risk factors, research shows that type 2 diabetes itself is indeed linked to increased risk of developing colon cancer. Studies also show that among patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, those with diabetes were more likely than those without it to die – even after controlling for other factors such as disease stage, body weight, and smoking habits. There are a few major hypotheses for the link, according to Peter Campbell, Ph.D., an American Cancer Society researcher who has been studying the connection between diabetes and colon cancer for a number of years. One idea has to do with a condition that causes the amount of insulin in a person’s blood to be higher than normal, called hyperinsulinemia. Insulin is the body’s way of regulating the amount of sugar – or glucose – in the blood. Hyperinsulinemia can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. The thought, says Campbell, is that the abnormally high level Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Link between Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease 1. Cardiovascular disease is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of early death among people with diabetes—about 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease and stroke. The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is dramatically higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. 2. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people without diabetes. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality for people with diabetes. If you have diabetes your risk of cardiovascular disease rises for a number of reasons. Hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and obesity, all risk factors in their own right for cardiovascular disease, occur more frequently in people with diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes causes damage to your body’s blood vessels making them more prone to damage from atherosclerosis and hypertension. People with diabetes develop atherosclerosis at a younger age and more severely than people without diabetes. Hy Continue reading >>

The Pathophysiology Of Cardiovascular Disease And Diabetes: Beyond Blood Pressure And Lipids

The Pathophysiology Of Cardiovascular Disease And Diabetes: Beyond Blood Pressure And Lipids

In Brief The pathophysiology of the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is complex and multifactorial. Understanding these profound mechanisms of disease can help clinicians identify and treat CVD in patients with diabetes, as well as help patients prevent these potentially devastating complications. This article reviews the biological basis of the link between diabetes and CVD, from defects in the vasculature to the cellular and molecular mechanisms specific to insulin-resistant states and hyperglycemia. It concludes with a discussion of heart failure in diabetes, a clinical entity that demonstrates many of the mechanisms discussed. Diabetes is a prime risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Vascular disorders include retinopathy and nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), stroke, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Diabetes also affects the heart muscle, causing both systolic and diastolic heart failure. The etiology of this excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is not completely clear. Evidence suggests that although hyperglycemia, the hallmark of diabetes, contributes to myocardial damage after ischemic events, it is clearly not the only factor, because both pre-diabetes and the presence of the metabolic syndrome, even in normoglycemic patients, increase the risk of most types of CVD.1–4 In 2002, a survey of people in the United States with diagnosed diabetes found that, surprisingly, 68% of patients did not consider themselves at risk for heart attack or stroke.5 In addition, only about half of patients surveyed reported that their health care providers discussed the high risk of CVD in diabetes and what steps they could take to reduce that risk.5 Fortunately, we are now making the link. Health care providers are now focuse Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The diabetes–heart disease connection and what it means for you Understand the interactions between these two conditions. Photo: Thinkstock Exercise and a heart-healty diet lowers risks from both heart disease and diabetes. Decades ago, data from the historic Framingham Heart Study revealed that having diabetes significantly increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In the intervening years, scientists have learned more about how the two deadly diseases interact. But the magnitude of the problem has expanded as well. Currently, two-thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of heart disease or stroke. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than nondiabetic people, and at least 65% of these patients will die from their heart disease. The most important advice for the diabetic patient is to control modifiable risk factors for heart disease with the following actions: Stop smoking. Lower your blood pressure. Control your weight. Exercise. Monitor your blood sugar levels. Diabetes doubles your risks for heart disease and stroke, according to the National Institutes of Health. Having diabetes also means you may develop these problems at a younger age. High blood sugar levels can lead to deposits of fat on the inside of blood vessel walls, increasing your chances of narrowed, hardened and/or clogged blood vessels. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor about the best ways to lower your risks for heart disease. Continue reading >>

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Diabetes puts you at risk of heart disease (even if you have ‘normal’ looking cholesterol and no symptoms). This is because diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Heart attacks and strokes are up to four times more likely in people with diabetes For this reason, often people with diabetes are on blood pressure lowering medications, often in combination Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure Diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure. Blood pressure lowering medications are often required for people who have diabetes. Symptoms Often people do not know they have heart disease until they develop symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness or excessive fatigue when walking or exercising. It is important to note that symptoms may be mild to severe and sometimes there may be none at all. Examples of some other warning symptoms may be: Arm or jaw discomfort Indigestion Weakness Nausea. If you think you are having a heart attack, phone 000 IMMEDIATELY. How can I reduce the risk? One of the most important things to do to reduce the risk of heart disease is to meet with your doctor and/or Credentialled Diabetes Educator to discuss your individual risk factors and how to reduce them. In general terms you can reduce the risk by: Being physically active Losing weight if you are overweight Not smoking Managing blood fats Managing high blood pressure Ta Continue reading >>

The 411 On Heart Disease + Diabetes

The 411 On Heart Disease + Diabetes

Last month, we launched a new series on diabetes complications. The idea is definitely not to use scare tactics to convince you to take better care of yourself, but rather to embrace the notion that "knowledge is power" and that if you are diagnosed with a complication, life goes on... (Hey, we're facing our own worst fears here, too) It just so happens that February is National Heart Month (go figure), so this month we're focusing on that nasty thing that can happen to your heart with diabetes: cardiovascular disease. Our expert help is Dr. Robert Eckel, an endocrinologist and past president of the American Health Association. Not only is he a professional expert, he's also had type 1 diabetes for the past 50 years! PWDs are two to four times more likely to suffer with cardiovascular disease, so listen up! Like retinopathy, there are several types of cardiovascular disease, with their own symptoms and treatments: 1. Coronary artery disease: This is the first type of heart disease and is caused by narrowing or blocking of the blood vessels that travel to your heart via fatty deposits. If the blood vessels to your heart become partially or totally blocked, then the blood supply is reduced or cut off. When that happens, a heart attack can occur. Coronary artery disease can cause a heart attack. During a heart attack, symptoms include: chest pain or discomfort pain or discomfort in your arms, back, jaw, neck, or stomach shortness of breath sweating nausea light-headedness Dr. Eckel points out that due to nerve damage from diabetes, a heart attack could be painless, and you might not even know if you've had one. Scary! If you have had a heart attack, your doctor may put you on a blood thinner, like aspirin, which can help reduce the chances of a second heart attack. 2. Hear Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

You’ve become the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal of medicine. A must-read every morning. I was an ordinary doctor until I found Medscape. A wonderful resource tool with great updates. ” Continue reading >>

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Error Loading Player: No Playable Sources Found

Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, but the number-one cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is actually heart disease. Heart disease and diabetes often occur together, and the link between them is high blood sugar. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In fact, the CDC reports heart disease is responsible for one of every four deaths. For this reason, it’s essential for anyone with type 2 diabetes to understand the link between heart disease and diabetes and take proper preventative measures to manage or reverse their diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you probably already know about insulin resistance. Because the body does not use insulin properly, the pancreas tries to compensate by making extra insulin. Over time, it can’t keep up, and the body cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels. (Find out more information about insulin resistance here.) Those high glucose levels can harden arteries over time. Your arteries need to be spacious and flexible to get proper blood and oxygen circulation throughout the body; tight and rigid arteries force the heart to work harder to pump the blood around. This leads to heart disease. Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes may follow certain lifestyles that can trigger heart disease. The same diet and habits that lead to type 2 diabetes can also lead to heart disease because of their connection to high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And it doesn’t stop there: Those same problems can lead to other conditions, such as erectile dysfunction or stroke. The good news: Both type 2 diabetes and heart disease can be prevented or managed by lifestyle choices. Lean proteins and heart-healthy meals can help keep cholesterol levels low, and ample research supports eating a vegetarian Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.1 People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.2 The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Smoking Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as lung disease. Smoking also can damage the blood vessels in your legs and increase the risk of lower leg infections, ulcers, a Continue reading >>

Microalbuminuria: A Genetic Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease?

Microalbuminuria: A Genetic Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease?

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes is associated with a 2–3 fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The poor relationship between this risk and either glycaemic control or diabetes duration suggests that some other aspect of the diabetic state, and not hyperglycaemia per se, mediates this risk. This other aspect of diabetes does not comprise alterations in recognized cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure or lipids, as the major component of the excess risk is in those diabetics with low levels of the other risk factors. It thus appears that there may be some factors that predispose both to diabetes and to cardiovascular disease. In insulin-dependent diabetics most of the excess risk of cardiovascular disease occurs in subjects with proteinuria, and microalbuminuria or proteinuria in non-insulin-dependent diabetics also substantially increases cardiovascular risk. Although changes in recognized risk factors in diabetics with nephropathy may partly explain these observations, we and others have shown that microalbuminuric non-diabetics also have a markedly increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease and substantially increased cardiovascular mortality. The observations that in insulin-dependent diabetics nephropathy shows family clustering and that these patients have elevated sodium lithium counter-transport rate, a possible genetic marker for the vascular complications of hypertension, have led to the suggestion that microalbuminuria may be a marker of a genetic predisposition to vascular disease. However, in a recent population study, we have found that microalbuminuric men are substantially shorter than normoalbuminuric men, raising instead the possibility that early environmental influences, in utero or in early neonatal life, may predispose to m Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

3. Diabetes-CVD Facts

  • More than 65% of all deaths in people with diabetes are caused by cardiovascular disease.
  • Heart attacks occur at an earlier age in people with diabetes and often result in premature death.
3 4. Diabetes-CVD Facts
  • Up to 60% of adults with diabetes have high blood pressure.
  • Nearly all adults with diabetes have one or more cholesterol problems, such as:
    • high triglycerides
    • low HDL (“good”) cholesterol
    • high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol
4 5. What is Diabetes ?
  • Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism
  • After digestion, glucose enters the blood stream
  • Then Glucose goes to cell through out the body where it Is used for energy
  • However, a hormone called insulin must be present to allow glucose to entre the cells
  • Insulin is produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach
6. Continue…
  • In people who do not have diabetes, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells
  • However, diabetes develops when the pancreas does not make enough insulin , or the cells in muscle,liver,and fats do not use insulin properly, or both.
8. Continue…
  • As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy…………..
9. Complications 10. Complications
  • Over time, high blood glucose levels damage nerves and blood vessels , leading to complications such as heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death among people with diabetes
  • Uncontrolled diabet Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Scrutinized

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Scrutinized

The link between diabetes and heart disease is well-known -- diabetics are two to four times more likely to have cardiovascular disease than nondiabetics, and two-thirds will die of an early heart attack or stroke. But the link itself is poorly understood. "A person with diabetes and no cardiovascular history has the same risk of having a heart attack as a person who has had a prior heart attack," said Dr. Ruchi Mathur, an endocrinologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Now researchers are attempting to figure out both the precise connection and what it means for treatment. "We need to understand why there is this risk because it has profound implications for therapy," said Dr. Jorge Plutzky, director of the vascular disease prevention program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "You should conceivably treat every patient with diabetes as aggressively as a heart attack survivor." That means going beyond the traditional focus on dramatically lowering blood sugar levels. Patients should also minimize a cluster of other risk factors that are common to both diabetes and cardiovascular disease: obesity, hypertension, unhealthy cholesterol profiles and, recent research indicates, inflammation. It also means that doctors should screen patients with heart disease for diabetes, and visa versa. By learning more about the mechanisms through which diabetes damages the heart, scientists may be able to interrupt or forestall the injury, extending patients' life span and improving their quality of life along the way. "People always think of diabetes as a sugar problem because it is diagnosed based on the amount of glucose in the blood," said Dr. Richard Nesto, chairman of the cardiology department at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. "However, we now recogniz Continue reading >>

Heart Disease & Erectile Dysfunction

Heart Disease & Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction, or impotence, is the inability to achieve and sustain an erection suitable for sexual intercourse. The condition is not considered normal at any age. Premature ejaculation, infertility, or low sex drive are not the same as erectile dysfunction, though one or more of these conditions may be associated with it. How serious a problem is erectile dysfunction? It is estimated that erectile dysfunction affects about 1 in 10 adult males on a long-term basis. A much more common problem that affects most men at some point is the occasional failure to achieve an erection. Occasional failure can occur for a variety of reasons, such as from drinking too much alcohol or from extreme fatigue. Failure to achieve an erection less than 20 percent of the time is not unusual and treatment is rarely needed. Failure more than 50 percent of the time generally means there is a psychological or physical problem (or combination of both) that requires treatment. Is erectile dysfunction a normal part of aging? No. ED doesn't have to be a part of getting older. While it is true that older men may need more stimulation (such as stroking and touching) to achieve an erection, they should still be able to get an erection and enjoy sex. What causes ED? In order to achieve an erection, three conditions must occur: the nerves to the penis must be functioning properly the blood circulation to the penis must be adequate there must be a stimulus from the brain If there is something interfering with any or all of these conditions, a full erection will be prevented. Diseases that commonly cause ED include: Vascular disease: Vascular diseases are those that affect the blood vessels. These diseases include atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), hypertension (high blood pressure), and Continue reading >>

Ed And Heart Disease

Ed And Heart Disease

Many still see erectile dysfunction (ED) as a purely sexual issue, but research suggests it’s much more than that. In fact, there appears to be a link between ED and heart disease. As several studies have reported, ED may be one of the first signs of cardiovascular problems for many men. An erection is the result of extra blood flow to your penis that fills and swells its blood vessels. Any time something interferes with blood flow to your penis’s blood vessels, an erection will be difficult to get or maintain. This can happen when heart disease clogs or hardens your arteries, in a condition known as atherosclerosis. The small blood vessels and arteries in your body, such as those in your penis, are often affected by atherosclerosis. As a result, ED can be a sign of heart disease. Erectile dysfunction and heart disease share many of the same risk factors, including: age high blood pressure high blood cholesterol smoking obesity diabetes depression Age As you get older, your risk of both ED and heart disease increases. But the connection between these conditions is stronger among younger men, according to the Mayo Clinic. If you experience ED under the age of 50, it’s more likely to be a sign of underlying heart problems. If you experience it after the age of 70, it’s much less likely to be linked to heart disease. High blood pressure When your blood pressure is high for an extended time, it can damage the lining of your arteries and interfere with your blood flow. This appears to affect your ability to get and maintain an erection. A 2012 study published in the journal Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension found that approximately 30 percent of men with hypertension complain of ED. High blood cholesterol High blood cholesterol can also damage your arter Continue reading >>

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