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Is There A Difference Between Humalog And Novolog?

The Difference Between Basal And Bolus Insulin

The Difference Between Basal And Bolus Insulin

In order to understand the role of both basal and bolus insulin, it is important to first understand how the body naturally uses glucose and insulin. When food is eaten, it is digested and converted to glucose (sugar) so it can be used for energy. Virtually every cell in the body, including your brain, needs glucose to function properly. The hormone ​insulin is needed to carry that glucose into cells in all parts of the body so that it can be used for energy. Some of this glucose is stored in the liver as a reserve fuel (called glycogen) that is released when glucose is not available through food. So, between the glucose that is consumed through food and what is gradually released from the liver, the body gets a constant supply of glucose. This also means that there needs to be a constant supply of insulin in the body to keep the amount of glucose in balance. Since more glucose is produced after a meal, the pancreas secretes more insulin. When the amount of glucose is lower, such as between meals or at night, there is less insulin needed -- but there is always at least a small amount of insulin present in the body at all times. Defining Basal and Bolus Insulin Basal insulin is the background insulin that is normally supplied by the pancreas and is present 24 hours a day, whether or not the person eats. Bolus insulin refers to the extra amounts of insulin the pancreas would naturally make in response to glucose taken in through food. The amount of bolus insulin produced depends on the size of the meal. In a person with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas no longer automatically makes insulin regardless of the intake of glucose. The beta cells that produce the insulin have largely shut down. Both the basal, or long-term background insulin, and the bolus, or quick bursts of in Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers From The F.i.x.; Insulin Aspart Vs Insulin Lispro; Phenothiazines And Contrast Media; Meperidine Removal From Formulary; Furosemide And Albumin As An Admixture

Questions And Answers From The F.i.x.; Insulin Aspart Vs Insulin Lispro; Phenothiazines And Contrast Media; Meperidine Removal From Formulary; Furosemide And Albumin As An Admixture

Research Article The Formulary Information Exchange (The F.I.X.) is an online drug information service available to subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service at or you may log on through drugfacts.com. In this column, we present samples of recent dialog on The F.I.X. If you would like more information on The Formulary Monograph Service or The F.I.X., please call 800-322-4349. If you would like to comment on any of the following questions or answers, please e-mail them to Dennis J. Cada at [email protected] Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Insulin Aspart And Lispro: Pharmacokinetic And Metabolic Effects.

Comparison Of Insulin Aspart And Lispro: Pharmacokinetic And Metabolic Effects.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare insulin levels and actions in patients with type 1 diabetes after subcutaneous injection of the rapid-acting insulin analogs aspart and lispro. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Seven C-peptide-negative patients with type 1 diabetes (two men and five women) were studied at the General Clinical Research Center at Temple University Hospital two times, 1 month apart. Their plasma glucose was normalized overnight by intravenous infusion of insulin. The next morning, they received subcutaneous injections of either aspart or lispro (9.4 +/- 1.9 U) in random order. For the next 4-5 h, their plasma glucose was clamped at approximately 5.5 mmol/l with a variable infusion of 20% glucose. The study was terminated after 8 h. RESULTS: Both insulin analogs produced similar serum insulin levels (250-300 pmol/l) at approximately 30 min and disappeared from serum after approximately 4 h. Insulin aspart and lispro had similar effects on glucose and fat metabolism. Effects on carbohydrate metabolism (glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and endogenous glucose production) peaked after approximately 2-3 h and disappeared after approximately 5-6 h. Effects on lipid metabolism (plasma free fatty acid, ketone body levels, and free fatty acid oxidation) appeared to peak earlier (at approximately 2 h) and disappeared earlier (after approximately 4 h) than the effects on carbohydrate metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that both insulin aspart and lispro are indistinguishable from each other with respect to blood levels and that they are equally effective in correcting abnormalities in carbohydrate and fat metabolism in patients with type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

Patients Vs. Pharma: Hagens Berman Files Complaint Against 'big Three' Insulin Producers

Patients Vs. Pharma: Hagens Berman Files Complaint Against 'big Three' Insulin Producers

The law firm Hagens Berman has filed a complaint in Massachusetts* against Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi, the ‘big three’ pharmaceutical companies that hold a near-monopoly on the insulin market. People living with type 1 diabetes will be the plaintiffs in this class action lawsuit, which alleges that Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi have unjustly inflated their prices. The firm’s investigation shows that the publicly reported, list prices of Lantus, Levemir, Novolog and Humalog have increased by more than 160% in the last five years, while the prices offered to pharmacy benefit managers stayed constant or even decreased. Background In the drug pricing and distribution system, drug makers often offer lower prices to pharmacy benefit managers. However, in the case of Lantus, Levemir, Novolog and Humalog, Hagens Berman believe that the difference between the list price of insulin and the prices offered to pharmacy benefit managers is enormous. Pharmacy benefit managers profit from these price discrepancies. Hagens Berman assert that the list prices of Lantus, Levemir, Novolog and Humalog have moved so far away from the real prices offered to pharmacy benefit managers that they are fraudulent. Not only is that practice illegal, it is harming people living with diabetes in painful and cruel ways. You can read the full complaint by following this link. People with Diabetes Fight Back T1International has connected people living with type 1 diabetes to the legal team at Hagens Berman. Patients have shared their often painful experiences, and more are speaking out for change. An excerpt from the complaint notes that: ‘’Plaintiffs describe going into debt, taking out loans, moving back in with their parents, and quitting school to pay for their insulin. One pla Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Novolog Vs. Humalog

Novolog Vs. Humalog

4 years ago Humalog (Eli Lilly) and Novolog (Novo Nordisk) are both rapid acting insulin analogs. They are virtually interchangeable in most patients. However, a not insignificant number of patients have reported that Humalog seems to be absorbed slightly faster in their bodies so that the onset of action is somewhat faster. The difference in most cases is less than ten minutes but should be taken into consideration if you have an elevated sensitivity to blood sugar lows. Many patients circumvent the potential problem by simply injecting the Humalog at the time they start eating (or even during or immediately after) their meals instead of the more typical procedure of injecting the insulin ten to fifteen minutes before a meal. A reasonably good article that explores the differences between the two insulin analogs can be found on the Medscape website. It covers both sides of the coin since each of us is somewhat unique and YMMV (your mileage may vary). 4 years ago The nurse gave you a good analogy with the Pepsi to Coke comparison. The Humalog does have a faster onset than the Novolog. I always took my Humalog right after a meal because I am never sure if I will eat all of the carbs that are on my plate. Many times I do not finish, so for me, it's better to take the insulin after rather than a set amount with the carbs I thought I would eat right before my meal. Again, it is best for me. I don't know how your insulin regimen is. My doctor gave a carb to insulin ratio of 1 unit to every 12 grams of carbs. There are many people out there who have gone back and forth between the two, mostly due to insurance purposes. My own insurance has put Humalog on the a list as the "non-preferred" insulin, meaning a much higher copay. I switched to over-the-counter insulin, Novolin R m Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart

Insulin Aspart

Insulin aspart is a fast-acting insulin analog marketed by Novo Nordisk as NovoLog/NovoRapid. It is a manufactured form of human insulin; where a single amino acid has been exchanged. This change helps the fast-acting insulin analog be absorbed quickly into the bloodstream. As a result, it starts working in minutes, which allows one to take insulin and eat right away. Fast-acting insulin analogs are considered to act similarly to the way insulin is released in people without diabetes mellitus. Novolog allows for a flexible dosing schedule, which allows patients to adjust their insulin according to any changes in their eating habits.[1] The safety and efficacy of insulin aspart (NovoLog/NovoRapid) in real-life clinical practice was evaluated in the A1chieve study. It was created through recombinant DNA technology so that the amino acid, B28, which is normally proline, is substituted with an aspartic acid residue. This analog has increased charge repulsion, which prevents the formation of hexamers, to create a faster-acting insulin. The sequence was inserted into the yeast genome, and the yeast expressed the insulin analog, which was then harvested from a bioreactor. According to JDRF, insulin aspart was approved for marketing in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration in June 2000.[citation needed] Chemical properties[edit] The components of insulin aspart are as follows: Metal ion – zinc (19.6 μg/mL) Buffer – disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (1.25 mg/mL) Preservatives – m-cresol (1.72 mg/mL) and phenol (1.50 mg/mL) Isotonicity agents – glycerin (16 mg/mL) and sodium chloride (0.58 mg/mL). The pH of insulin aspart is 7.2–7.6.[2] Action time[edit] The onset of action is approximately 15 minutes, the peak action is reached in 45–90 minutes, Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs Novolog

Humalog Vs Novolog

Humalog vs. Novolog Important Differences and More Afreeza versus Humalog. My son has been on the. Insulin helps to control blood sugar levels in diabetes mellitus, including diabetes type and diabetes type. Afreeza is the brand name of an inhaled insulin that has just been approved by the FDA. Acting type of insulin. What is the difference between the two. Afreeza is an inhaled insulin. Humalog since diagnosis and I really like it, because it works right now, and I. MannKind Releases Positive Results for Afrezza. Like Regular, Humalog and Novolog are used to cover meals and snacks. Most meals raise the blood sugar for only to hours afterwards. Find information about prescribing Humalog U. 90 minutes with Humalog. I have also heard that switching insulins is a big deal and to consult a doctor. Once injected, Regular. Humalog conversion to novolog Humalog conversion to novolog. Find information about prescribing Humalog U. I have read a lot about Novolog and it seems like that could. My health plan just changed, and I unfortunately have seen my price for. Humalog go up drastically. While using Humalog some say take carbs at the time of injection then eat your meal within one hour to one and a half hours. HumalogInsulin human, rDNA IUml 3 ml x 5 Eli Learn their similarities and differences. Humalog and Novolog are rapid. What humalog vs novolog is the difference between. Canada Pharmacy is an Canadian Pharmacy. Acting types of insulin. My son use Novolog insulin and my daughter uses Humalog insulin. Ml, solution for injection in Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen. When it comes to comparing insulin in the same family, say. Ml, solution for injection in vial. Novolog or Lantus vs. Levemir, should diabetics test drive different insulin products. Animas Ping insulin pump. I have two Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog.

Humalog Vs. Novolog.

It wasn't until recently that I started thinking about building up a tolerance to insulin. Do you build up a chemical familiarity, a resistance of sorts, to a drug after taking it for ... oh, say a few decades? Do PWD eventually become the Dread Pirate Roberts, building up a tolerance to iocane powder? "I realize this is probably ridiculous, and I'm sure there aren't any studies on this," I said to my doctor the other week. "But it has prompted me to want to try a different kind of fast acting insulin, to see if I have better results. Is that something I'm able to do, to have a script written for a one-off in order to assess how the insulin might work for me?" "We can do that." And I left the appointment, expecting my pharmacy to auto-dial me when my order was complete. Instead, a three-month supply of Novolog ended up on my doorstep, having been accidentally shuttled through my mail order pharmacy and eating up my insurance order that was intended for my normal course of Humalog. Which is why I'm experimenting with Novolog for the next few months, as a result of a shipping error. I've been taking Humalog for over ten years, after switching from Regular insulin before starting on my insulin pump, so I feel like I'm familiar with how Humalog acts in my pump and on my blood sugars. Switching to a different, but similar, rapid-acting analog should hopefully be a seamless transition. Last night was my first pump-load of Novolog, despite the last unopened bottle of Humalog in my stash. (I didn't want to use up the Humalog entirely, then switch to Novolog, because if I absolutely hated the new insulin, I'd be stuck with it.) So far, last night was entirely uneventful, and the biggest change I've noticed (in less than 24 hours of use) is that the bottle of Novolog plays host t Continue reading >>

Fiasp Insulin, Insulin Aspart, Fiasp Vs Novolog

Fiasp Insulin, Insulin Aspart, Fiasp Vs Novolog

It’s understandable if you are wondering what Fiasp insulin is. The truth is, we were wondering the same thing when the FDA announced its approval of Novo Nordisk’s new, first in class, injectable, “faster-acting” insulin. What do we mean by faster-acting insulin? Well, now there are two levels of fast when it comes to mealtime (rapid-acting) insulin: Fast and Faster. Insulin aspart is a powerhouse in the world of diabetes. It was introduced under the brand name Novolog in June of 2000. For over 15 years, Novolog has been a staple of insulin regimens for many patients. Novolog and Humalog are the two most commonly prescribed fast-acting insulins that patients take within 15 minutes of mealtime. For this article, we will be paying closer attention to insulin aspart (more commonly called Novolog or Novorapid® in Europe and Canada). Novolog itself is an insulin analogue. This means it has been modified from regular insulin to change its structure and how quickly it is absorbed from under the skin. Novo Nordisk teamed up their workhorse Novolog insulin with a B3 vitamin (nicotinamide) to make it absorb more quickly and the amino acid arginine to stabilize it. That’s right! Fiasp insulin is simply Novolog with two small additions: Vitamin B3 and naturally occurring arginine. Researchers discovered that adding nicotinamide to the insulin aspart molecule causes its initial absorption to happen more quickly. This means it acts more like the insulin normally made by your pancreas. Fiasp insulin can even be taken up to 20 minutes AFTER starting the meal! So if Fiasp were racing Novolog, it could give Novolog a 15-minute head start and still catch up! Not only that, but twice as much insulin is available within 30 minutes of injecting Fiasp as compared to Novolog. More Continue reading >>

Product Important Safety Information

Product Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Selected Important Safety Information Tresiba® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients with hypersensitivity to Tresiba® or one of its excipients Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients NovoLog® and NovoLog® Mix 70/30 are contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin aspart or any of the excipients Warnings and Precautions Never Share a Tresiba® FlexTouch®; Levemir® FlexTouch®, NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog®FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device; or NovoLog®Mix 70/30 FlexPen® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Extra care is needed because NovoLog is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for NovoLog When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. NovoLog is a rapid-acting form of insulin that should be injected below the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not skip a meal or delay eating. 2. Prepare your insulin. An intermediate- or long-acting insulin is often prescribed with NovoLog. NovoLog can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw NovoLog into the syringe first. Never mix NovoLog with Lantus. Do not mix NovoLog with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, special sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make each vial or pen look different by putting a rubber band around one type of insulin. 6. Check your medicine. NovoLog can be confused with Humalog (another rapid-acting insulin). When you pick up your insulin at the pharmacy, be sure it's Continue reading >>

The Rising Price Of Insulin

The Rising Price Of Insulin

Diabetes is a chronic disease that afflicts 25.8 million Americans. Insulin, one of the primary treatments for diabetes, has been around since the 1920s. Yet, somehow the drug is still priced beyond the reach of many Americans. One of our advocates recently left a comment on our Facebook page regarding this problem, which encouraged us to take a closer look at it. Medication nonadherence (patients not taking medicine as prescribed) is undeniably related to diabetes-related health complications that result in emergency room visits and lost productivity. Diabetes is an expensive and deadly disease. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. and cost the country $245 billion last year. A few big pharmaceutical firms dominate the insulin market due to lengthy patents and lack of generic competition. Insulin is a biologic drug, which means that it is made up of living organisms rather than chemical compounds. This makes it more difficult to copy, which biotech companies often use as justification for the exorbitant prices they charge for the drugs. We’ve had anecdotal evidence from a consumer of a big price hike on her Humalog insulin this year. When she was trying to find out further information about the price increase, she was told by her insurance company to expect the drug to go up 25 percent more in December. News reports indicate that the cost of Lantus, a top-selling insulin produced by Sanofi, has gone up twice already this year, first 10 and then 15 percent. In addition, Novo Nordisk has also increased the price of Levemir, another common insulin treatment, by 10 percent. What’s going on here? Overall drug spending is slightly down due to generic drug utilization being up. And generic competition isn’t too far off for many of these drugs. It looks l Continue reading >>

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