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Is There 5 Types Of Diabetes?

Forms Of Diabetes

Forms Of Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes accounts for roughly 10% of the diabetes cases in the world with the majority being Type 2. An estimated 1-5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes are rare types, such as latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), maturity onset diabetes in the young (MODY), cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD), Cushing’s syndrome and others. Explore these various forms of diabetes and what makes them distinct in the diabetes family. Learn how to test for diabetes type. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is a chronic, autoimmune condition that occurs when the body’s own immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. This attack leaves the pancreas with little or no ability to produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without insulin, sugar stays in the blood and can cause serious damage to organ systems, causing people to experience Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).READ MORE What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cannot properly use insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. This is also known as insulin resistance. In Type 2, the pancreas initially produces extra insulin, but eventually cannot keep up with production in order to keep blood sugar levels in check. Of the 415 million diabetes cases globally, 90% are estimated to be Type 2.READ MORE Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that affects pregnant women, and occurs in 1 in 25 pregnancies worldwide. It is caused by the malfunctioning of insulin receptors, due to the presence of hormones from the placenta. It develops usually around the 24th week of pregnancy and will continue to affect both the mother and unborn child throughout the pregnancy.READ MORE LADA, (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) diabetes is rare and known Continue reading >>

How Many Types Of Diabetes Are There?

How Many Types Of Diabetes Are There?

This is a question that we get asked regularly. If we asked this question to the general population twenty years ago, a majority probably wouldn’t have any idea. But today, unfortunately, so many people have diabetes that everyone seems to at least have heard of type 1 and type 2. And—due to the rising rate of obesity in pregnant women—the public is becoming much more familiar with gestational diabetes. However, when you get to the details of this complex disease, things get less and less clear cut—not only how many types of diabetes there are, but also how they’re characterized. For example, type 1 is an autoimmune disease, and people require insulin at diagnosis. Usually the diagnosis is in childhood, adolescence or early adulthood, but not always (people can be diagnosed with type 1 at any age). Type 2 isn’t autoimmune, and it may take years before a person requires insulin, if at all—and patients are usually older and often overweight, but again this is a generality, particularly as the number of people who are obese grows and gets younger. Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy, and blood glucose returns to normal after delivery, but often it doesn’t. In addition, researchers have discovered another category of diabetes called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Think of LADA as a slowly progressing version of type 1 with some of the characteristics of type 2. In fact, some people call it type 1.5. People with LADA have antibodies to the disease like those with type 1 but they don’t need insulin right away. Their blood glucose can be controlled on lifestyle or oral agents for months or sometimes years. There’s more. Type 1, 2, gestational diabetes and LADA are polygenic—this means that it takes the involvement of many genes to c Continue reading >>

Different Types Of Diabetes

Different Types Of Diabetes

There are many types of diabetes. The classification (or groups) in which each falls seems to overlap at times. Diabetes mellitus is descriptive of a group of disorders, characterized by high blood glucose levels. There are four major groups defined: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) Diabetes secondary to other conditions These groups are sometimes referred to as the four types of diabetes. Although in the general use of diabetic terms, there are many recognized types of diabetes. With the dominant three being: Type 1: Type 1 diabetes is now universally accepted as the term to describe former terms, such as: Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Childhood onset diabetes. Juvenile diabetes. Results from the body's failure to produce insulin. It is estimated that 5-10% of all persons who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes Almost all type 1 diabetics must take insulin injections. Risks can be very effectively reduced with adequate control of glucose levels Type 2: Type 2 diabetes is the term best used to describe conditions such as: adult onset diabetes. obesity related diabetes. non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Results from insulin resistance, at times in conjunction with an insulin deficiency. When cells fail to use insulin properly, then it is seen as an insulin resistant condition. Most of the people diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Many people spend many years as pre-diabetes, before deteriorating to a full blown type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Pre-diabetes is when the blood glucose levels are elevated (higher than normal), but not high enough to be classed as a type 2 diabetic. Risks can be very effectively reduced with adequate cont Continue reading >>

Reviewing The Types Of Diabetes

Reviewing The Types Of Diabetes

The incidence of different types of diabetes is on the rise in the United States and worldwide. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a 217% increase in the prevalence of diabetes in those 0–44 years of age and a 150% increase in those 65–74 years of age from 1990 to 2009. While the rise in cases of Type 2 diabetes is perhaps most striking, it appears that the incidence of Type 1 diabetes is increasing as well. But Types 1 and 2 aren’t the only types of diabetes out there: There’s also gestational diabetes, maturity-onset diabetes of the young, and the so-called Type 1.5 diabetes, not to mention prediabetes, which raises a person’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. All types of diabetes are characterized by high blood glucose levels, and all can lead to complications, but the causes of different types of diabetes may be different, and the treatments can be different, too. Here is a run-down of the characteristics of various types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. As a result, the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes is also characterized by the presence of certain autoantibodies against insulin or other components of the insulin-producing system such as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), tyrosine phosphatase, and/or islet cells. When the body does not have enough insulin to use the glucose that is in the bloodstream for fuel, it begins breaking down fat reserves for energy. However, the breakdown of fat creates acidic by-products called ketones, which accumulate in the blood. If enough ketones accumulate in the blood, they can cause a potentially life-threatening chem Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Other Types Of Diabetes

Other Types Of Diabetes

In addition to Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes, there are a range of other types, which are just as important. If you add up everyone with the rarer types of diabetes together that’s quite a lot of people. Unfortunately, many of these people are misdiagnosed leading to delays in getting the right treatment. We’re proud of the research we have supported to ensure better diagnosis and treatments for all types of diabetes, and it’s taught us a lot about the condition. Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) MODY is a rare form of diabetes which is different from both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and runs strongly in families. MODY is caused by a mutation (or change) in a single gene. If a parent has this gene mutation, any child they have, has a 50 per cent chance of inheriting it from them. If a child does inherit the mutation they will generally go on to develop MODY before they’re 25, whatever their weight, lifestyle, ethnic group etc. Neonatal diabetes Neonatal diabetes is a form of diabetes that is diagnosed under the age of six months. It’s a different type of diabetes than the more common Type 1 diabetes as it’s not an autoimmune condition (where the body has destroyed its insulin producing cells). Wolfram Syndrome Wolfram Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder which is also known as DIDMOAD syndrome after its four most common features (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness). Alström Syndrome Alström Syndrome is a rare genetically inherited syndrome which has a number of common features. Save for later Continue reading >>

What Are The Different Types Of Diabetes?

What Are The Different Types Of Diabetes?

What are the different types of diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases in which the body either doesn’t produce enough or any insulin, does not properly use the insulin that is produced, or a combination of both. When any of these things happens, the body is unable to get sugar from the blood into the cells. That leads to high blood sugar levels. Glucose, the form of sugar found in your blood, is one of your chief energy sources. Lack of insulin or resistance to insulin causes sugar to build up in your blood. This can lead to many health problems. The three main types of diabetes are: type 1 diabetes type 2 diabetes gestational diabetes Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune condition. It happens when your immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the beta cells in your pancreas that produce insulin. The damage is permanent. What prompts the attack isn’t clear. There may be both genetic and environmental components. Lifestyle factors aren’t thought to play a role. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes starts as insulin resistance. This means your body can’t use insulin efficiently. That stimulates your pancreas to produce more insulin until it can no longer keep up with demand. Insulin production decreases, which leads to high blood sugar. The exact cause is unknown. Contributing factors may include genetics, lack of exercise, and being overweight. There may also be other health factors and environmental reasons. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is due to insulin blocking hormones produced during pregnancy. This type of diabetes only occurs during pregnancy. Learn more: What you should know about pregestational diabetes » General symptoms of diabetes include: excessive thirst and hunger frequent urination drowsiness or fatigue Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2

Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Understanding diabetes starts with knowing the different types of diabetes and their key differences. The two most common types are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin due to an overactive immune system. So people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults but can also appear in older adults. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, your body prevents the insulin it does make from working right. Your body may make some insulin but not enough. Most people with diabetes—about 90% to 95%—have type 2. This kind of diabetes usually happens in people who are older, although even younger adults may be diagnosed with it. Type 2 diabetes also usually occurs in people who are overweight. In fact, about 8 out of 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) Some women may develop diabetes during pregnancy, which is called gestational diabetes. Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes doesn't mean a woman had diabetes before or would continue to have diabetes after giving birth. A woman should follow her health care provider's advice closely during pregnancy. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Types

Diabetes Types

There are three main types of diabetes: Diabetes type 1 Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease where the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and require lifelong insulin replacement for survival. The disease can occur at any age, although it mostly occurs in children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes referred to as 'juvenile onset diabetes' or 'insulin dependent diabetes'. Personal story: diabetes mellitus type 1 Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can be both emotionally and practically challenging. Listening to others who have experienced similar situations is often re-assuring and can be helpful for you, your loved ones or when preparing questions for your doctor or a specialist. Watch this video about a patient's experience after being diagnosed with diabetes type 1. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400% Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadow Font FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifC Continue reading >>

Other Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Other Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

In most cases of diabetes, referred to as type 1 and type 2, no specific cause can be identified. This is referred to as primary or idiopathic diabetes. A small minority of cases, estimated at about 2%, arise as the consequence of some other well-defined disease or predisposing factor such as pancreatitis or steroid excess. This is called 'secondary diabetes'. Secondary diabetes can be sub-divided into single-gene disorders affecting insulin secretion or resistance, damage to the exocrine pancreas, other endocrine disease, drug-induced diabetes, uncommon manifestations of autoimmune diabetes, and genetic syndromes associated with diabetes. Gestational diabetes (diabetes arising for the first time in pregnancy) has a diagnostic category all to itself, but is included in this section for convenience. Secondary diabetes is often (but not always) associated with a relatively mild metabolic disturbance, but may nonetheless result in typical long-term complications such as retinopathy. Although it is relatively uncommon, the possibility of secondary diabetes should always be considered, since it may be a pointer to other disease, often requires a different approach to therapy, and is sometimes reversible. Background The common denominator of all the forms of diabetes discussed here is that something sets them apart from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Since type 2 diabetes is hard to define, this implies that for most forms of diabetes in this category there is a pointer to a different pathophysiological explanation! The current WHO classification of diabetes, adopted and regularly updated by the American Diabetes Association, identifies four main categories of diabetes, and secondary diabetes is clssified under 'other specific types' (see figures). The common categories of secon Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (or diabetes) is a chronic, lifelong condition that affects your body's ability to use the energy found in food. There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes mellitus have something in common. Normally, your body breaks down the sugars and carbohydrates you eat into a special sugar called glucose. Glucose fuels the cells in your body. But the cells need insulin, a hormone, in your bloodstream in order to take in the glucose and use it for energy. With diabetes mellitus, either your body doesn't make enough insulin, it can't use the insulin it does produce, or a combination of both. Since the cells can't take in the glucose, it builds up in your blood. High levels of blood glucose can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, heart, eyes, or nervous system. That's why diabetes -- especially if left untreated -- can eventually cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve damage to nerves in the feet. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, because it often begins in childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It's caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes may be caused by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. A number of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Many of them stem from damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). Even more serious is the increased risk of hea Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy can be broken into several types. This is because we have different kinds of nerves in our bodies that serve different functions. Your symptoms and treatments depend on which type of diabetic neuropathy you have. There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: Peripheral diabetic neuropathy goes by various names: peripheral diabetic nerve pain and distal polyneuropathy. In this Patient Guide, we’ll refer to it as peripheral diabetic neuropathy, or simply peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of neuropathy caused by diabetes. It affects nerves leading to your extremities—to your feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves going to your feet are the longest in your body: after they branch off the spinal cord in the lumbar region (low back), they have to go all the way down your legs and into the feet—quite a distance. Because the nerves leading to your feet are so long, it’s most often these nerves that are damaged; there’s more of them to be damaged. This nerve damage can lead to the foot problems often associated with diabetes, including foot deformities, infections, ulcers, and amputations. The article on diabetic neuropathy symptoms will help you learn more about the specific symptoms associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Proximal neuropathy can also be called diabetic amyotrophy. That myo in the word means muscle, so this is a form of neuropathy that can cause muscle weakness. It specifically affects the muscles in the upper part of your leg(s), buttocks, and hips. Sometimes, proximal neuropathy can also involve nerve pain, especially pain that shoots from the low back and down the leg. The technical medical term for that is radiculopathy, although most people refer to it as sciatica. If there’s also s Continue reading >>

What Type Of Diabetes Do I Have?

What Type Of Diabetes Do I Have?

There are at least two different types of diabetes. Making an accurate diagnosis, especially later in life, is sometimes difficult. We will explain the different types below. To make an accurate diagnosis, please use this information to have a conversation with your doctor. No web page is equipped to make a medical diagnosis! Historically there are two forms of diabetes, type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) and type 2 diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes). Now a days there are more types as scientists realize that there are multiple causes, including MODY, LADA, Bronze Diabetes, and Steroid Induced Diabetes. Still most doctors will place the forms under a type 1 or type 2 heading. The cause of the disease is the determining factor on which type you have. Treatment is important, but both types (many of the types) share the same treatment so the discriminating factor is the cause. Online, you often see abbreviations like T1, T2, and T1.5. This simply means ‘type 1 diabetes’, ‘types 2 diabetes’, and ‘type 1.5 diabetes’. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. This means that your body’s defenses have taken to attacking the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. As a consequence, you can no longer produce insulin and have to take exogenous (an outside source) insulin in order to survive. The GADA (glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody) test is a common test which screens for auto antibodies, or antibodies which recognize you instead of a foreign body. This is the hallmark of an autoimmune disease so have autoantibodies means you have an autoimmune disease. The c-peptide test measures the c-peptide produced during insulin creation. There is a 1:1 ratio of c-peptide to insulin molecules so by measuring c-peptide doctors c Continue reading >>

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

How Many Forms Of Diabetes Exist

How Many Forms Of Diabetes Exist

What's mellitus diabetes? It's a pathology due to the alteration of carbohydrate metabolism. The pancreas, then, loses its ability to produce insulin, a protein hormone produced by beta cells and gradually decreases the amount until they completely stop to do it. Cells absorb sugar by this hormone and without it, the sugar isn’t absorbed and they remain in the blood causing a rise in blood glucose. How many forms of diabetes exist? There are too many types of diabetes that, even if it comes in a different way, the result is always the loss of the ability to produce insulin. The two principal types of diabetes are "diabetes of first type or youthful and diabetes of second type or adult. Other forms of diabetes are gestational diabetes that can occur temporarily in pregnant woman, diabetes MODY (Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young) and diabetes LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) How diabetes mellitus type 1 develops? Diabetes type 1 or insulin dependent diabetes may develop due to disease of the pancreas, infectious or traumatic events like car accidents or surgery, but more often it becomes the first type of diabetes without being affected by such events. The disease usually affects children in childhood or adolescence, but there are cases of adults who develop this form after thirty years. The causes that trigger diabetes type 1 and the process of self-destruction of the insulin-producing Beta cells are still unknown. The disease begins when the already 80 / 90% of the cells were destroyed without showing symptoms earlier. The classical symptoms are polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst), polyphagia (increased hunger), and weight loss. When his debut, juvenile diabetes must be treated quickly, otherwise it can have serious consequences Continue reading >>

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