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Is Squash Good To Eat For Diabetics?

Diabetes Diet: Health Benefits Of Acorn Squash Plus A Recipe

Diabetes Diet: Health Benefits Of Acorn Squash Plus A Recipe

Diabetes Diet: Health Benefits of Acorn Squash Plus A Recipe The green, heavily ridged acorn squash is plentiful in the marketplace this time of year. Though it has a high glycemic index rank of 75, eaten in moderation acorn squash provides a slew of nutrients beneficial for people with diabetes. One of the primary components of acorn squash is dietary fiber. A single serving contains nine fiber grams, more than a third of our daily requirement. Fiber is especially helpful for those with type 2 diabetes since it slows digestion and helps maintain stable glucose levels . The nutrients in acorn squash benefit three other diabetes concerns as well: Acorn squash is an excellent source of vitamin C, so vital for our immune system. Vitamin C stimulates the production of infection fighting white blood cells, and functions as an antioxidant, protecting us from the onset of problems such as cardiovascular disease. The high levels of vitamin A and beta carotene in acorn squash support our eyes health, helping to prevent vision problems such as cataracts and macular degeneration. We need an adequate intake of potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and acorn squash provides plenty of this mineral; plus, the magnesium in acorn squash helps our body effectively utilize potassium. Acorn squash also contains a mix of minerals for strong bones, its vitamin A promotes vibrant skin, and the antioxidants neutralize cell damaging free radicals associated with premature aging, and various illnesses. One way to enjoy the taste and nutritional benefits of acorn squash is to bake it with a few veggies, spices, herbsand some couscous. The prep time for this recipe could be anywhere from 15 to 60 minutes, depending on your mincing, measuring, and mixing skills. 1 medium acorn squash, halve Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Eating Squash Regularly Could Possibly Do Wonders For Diabetes

Eating Squash Regularly Could Possibly Do Wonders For Diabetes

Eating Squash Regularly Could Possibly Do Wonders For Diabetes New studies about squash show it has powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties, a food expert says. Squash includes both winter and summer varieties, some examples include, zucchini from the summer and butternut, buttercup, acorn, pumpkin and kabocha from winter, Phil Lempert, a food industry analyst, said in a statement. Many of the carbs in winter starch come from polysaccharides found in the cell walls. These polysaccharides include pectins specially structured polysaccharides that in winter squash often include special chains of D-galacturonic acid called homogalacturonan. An increasing number of animal studies now show that these starch-related components in winter squash have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, as well as anti-diabetic and insulin-regulating properties. Squash contains also essential minerals like potassium, manganese and copper. Although the squash is really a fruit, many people use it as a vegetable for culinary purposes. Squash can be prepared by baking it, cut into fries, put into soups or boiled. Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been tolda diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beansbut you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium.(Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes , shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the diseaseand even reverse it.) Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of carbohydrates. Bonus: They have more than 20% of your daily value of vitamin K, manganese Continue reading >>

Seasonal Eats: Winter Squash

Seasonal Eats: Winter Squash

By Tracey Neithercott; recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN Candy has ruined October. Instead of anticipating the month's harvest, most people focus on the annual candy-corn-and-mini-Snickers binge that comes with Halloween. That's a shame, since there's a much healthier way to treat your sweet tooth: by cooking up some succulent seasonal squash. A rainbow of squashhunter green, peachy tan, tangerine, jade, and buttercreamis available at most markets and is a good source of key nutrients like beta-carotene, vitamins A and C, potassium, and fiber. Winter squash, the tougher-skinned sister to summer squash like zucchini, is harvested in September and October and can keep through January. No matter its variety, a good winter squash should feel heavy for its size and be free from any cuts, breaks, or soft spots. To make sure your squash is as tasty on New Year's Day as it is on Halloween, store it in a dry room cooled to about 40 or 50 degrees. "Traditionally, people would store [squash] in their old farmhouse in the bedroom. People would keep them under the bed. Those conditions are best for squash," says Ryan Voiland, owner of Red Fire Farm in Granby, Mass., who has been growing squash for decades. The condition of the squash is also an important factor in how well it stores. "Unless you want to eat it right away, you don't want any nicks," Voiland says. Before you head to your local market to shop for squash, note that there are differences among varieties. "There are probably hundreds, or more than hundreds, of different varieties of squash," says Voiland. "Different varieties have different characteristics. Some are moister. I'd consider the butternut to be a very moist squash. Other varieties are drier. The kabocha is dry and almost flaky inside." If you've tried squash bef Continue reading >>

Diabetic Exchange Diet

Diabetic Exchange Diet

If you have diabetes, your doctor may put you on a diabetic exchange diet to help control both your weight and the amount of sugar and cholesterol in your blood. You will need to measure your food while on this diet, and you will probably need to eat 3 meals and 1 to 3 snacks daily. This diet divides the foods you can eat into 6 groups and measures each food by exact serving size to help you eat the right amount from each food group daily. Your dietitian will give you a meal plan that lists the number of servings you may eat from each food group shown below. The plan will give examples of a typical selection from each group. You can exchange any food in a group for any other from the same group, always limiting yourself to the specified serving sizes. For example, 1 slice of bread can be exchanged for 3/4 cup dry cereal. Or you can exchange 1/2 cup fruit juice for 1/2 of a 9-inch banana. Ask your dietitian for the correct serving size if a food you want is not listed below. At first, weigh or measure all of your foods and beverages so that you eat only the specified amounts. Do not use sugar and avoid foods on the "Do Not Eat" list. Breads and Starches for Diabetics 1/2 of a 3-inch bagel 1 slice bread (4-inch square) 1/2 cup cooked cereal 1/2 cup corn or 1 medium corn on the cob 6 saltine crackers or three 2-1/2-inch square graham crackers 1 small (2-inch square) dinner roll 1/2 cup cooked dried beans (such as kidney, pinto, lentils, chick peas, white, or navy) 1/2 of an English muffin 1/2 cup cooked green peas 1/2 of a hamburger or hot dog bun 1/2 cup cooked lima beans 1/2 cup cooked pasta 1/2 of a 6-inch piece of pita bread 1/2 cup mashed potatoes or a 3-inch baked potato 1/3 cup cooked rice 2 rice cakes One 6-inch round tortilla 1/2 cup cooked winter squash Fruits 1 Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Recipes: Spaghetti Squash

Recipes: Spaghetti Squash

It’s hard to give up pasta. Many diabetics who don’t notice that their blood sugar levels spike too high when they eat pasta. What’s too high? In general, I’d say over 150 mg/dl (8.33 mmol/l) measured one hour after a meal, or over 130 mg/dl (7.22 mmol/l) two hours after the meal. Other experts disagree and propose other numbers. An alternative to spaghetti pasta that shouldn’t raise blood glucose levels as high is spaghetti squash. It’s all about the carbohydrates. A cup of cooked spaghetti squash has 10 g of carb; a cup of cooked spaghetti has 43 g. The fiber grams are about the same. Numbers are from FitDay.com. Spaghetti squash is a classic low-carb vegetable. If you’ve never tried it, you should. As vegetables go, it’s one of the largest, heaviest, and most interesting to prepare. Easy, too. The spaghetti squash season is autumn and winter in the northern hemisphere. Purchasing in spring and summer may be iffy. In my part of the world, supermarket spaghetti squashes weigh between two and five pounds. We cooked a three-pounder (1.4 kg) that yielded five cups; a five-pounder (2.3 kg) gave us 12 cups. A serving size is one, maybe two cups. What you don’t eat immediately stays fresh in the refrigerator for at least several days. Re-heat by microwaving or stir-frying. Like pasta and potatoes, the squash by itself is bland. It’s a great substrate for sauces or seasonings. Here’s how we cook it at the Parker Compound. Preheat the oven to 375º F 0r 190º C. Very carefully slice the squash in half lengthwise. Spoon out and discard the guts (seeds and membranes like a pumpkin; it even smells like a pumpkin). Put the halves flat-side down in a pan, then add a half inch (1.3 cm) of water to the pan. Cover with foil and bake until the outer shell (rind) i Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Eating Zucchini For Diabetes, Eyes, Gout And Weight Loss

Benefits Of Eating Zucchini For Diabetes, Eyes, Gout And Weight Loss

Healthy Diet Plans >> Health Food >> Zucchini Health Benefits Zucchini is a popular summer squash from the Americas and Europe. Squash is a term that implies that a food is consumed raw, either in summer or winter. It is seen in its green and yellow variants. Zucchini is a nutritious fruit, often mistaken for a vegetable, which can be consumed in cooked or raw form. There are many health benefits of eating zucchini. They are low in calories and hence, helpful to curb obesity and high cholesterol levels. Zucchinis are an extremely rich source of folates, potassium, and vitamin A. You can also get a good portion of magnesium and manganese from a serving of zucchini. Zucchini will give you the complete amount of vitamins and minerals when you consume it in the steamed form. Health benefits of raw zucchini are the enhanced absorption of vital nutrients present in the fruit. You can include it as a part of your salad in 2 to 3 servings. When consumed in raw form, ensure that the zucchini should is not too mature or too long as it can be fibrous. Zucchini can also be consumed in the form of its juice as well. The health benefits of zucchini juice can be felt in the form of a total body cleansing. With its high water content, zucchini juice is highly satiating and treats your body with good nourishment of vitamin A and C and other vital minerals. Zucchini that comes with its flowers are at the right stage for eating. The flowers of zucchini are also edible and nutritious as the raw fruit. Take the firm, freshly blossomed flowers and remove their stamens or pistils. They can then be cooked or used while baking or in soups. The health benefits of zucchini flowers are the same as that of the squash or raw fruit. It gives you a plentiful supply of vitamin A , C, E, and K and mine Continue reading >>

Butternut Squash - Good Or Bad?

Butternut Squash - Good Or Bad?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I eat quite a bit of butternut squash tonight, because I thought it was low-carb (it is in the Collins carb book), but when I found it in the Fat, Calorie and Carb Bible, it said it was much higher. I've googled it, but every site seems to have a different carb value for it. Can anyone give me a definitive carb content for 100g? As far as its effect on me, my BGs were in single figures (just) after 2 hours and on their way down within three, so not ideal, but certainly not the worst thing I've eaten recently! I guess I'll try a smaller portion in future, but it would be good to know the carb value so I can work out my insulin better. Collins carb counter gives 2 g carb per 100 g - negligible. What do you eat with it to raise your BG ????????????? I would stick with the Calorie Carb & Fat Bible. (2010) Butternut Squash. Baked. Average........7.4g carbs per 100g. Fairly high for a Veg. This one similar......8.3g per 100g. (2011) We have had too many examples of the Collins Gem Books having glaring mistakes in them over the years. I no longer trust them as they don't even answer e-mails asking about the discrepancy...seems they want your money but after that you are on your own ! Very poor customer service....... So....CC&FB for me every time, it's one I trust. Google "nutrition info" for a food and you'll usually find the FDA site which is pretty good. You jst have to know to remove the fibre from your calculation. Americans have it in with the carbs[which chemically it is, but it's not digestible] Butternut squash is a good source of fiber and potassium too, my wife makes a mean soup and its absolutely delicious. I like them sliced and drizzled with Ol Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods You Should Eat This Summer

Top 10 Foods You Should Eat This Summer

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition If you're wondering what the best foods are to eat with diabetes this summer, check out our top picks for fresh and flavorful summer eats that will keep you cool and your body nourished. From fresh fruits to sizzling vegetables, you'll love knowing that you're taking care of your body and your diabetes while feasting on the power foods of summer. Visit your local farmer's markets for the best in seasonal fare. Refreshing, tasty, and hydrating, watermelon needs no dressing up to provide the nutrition and flavors we crave. Summertime is when watermelons are best in quality and price. Watermelons come in all shapes and sizes, and they have thick green rinds that are spotted or striped. The inflammation-fighting antioxidants in watermelon may reduce risk of complications of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and arthritis. Watermelon is also high in vitamins C and A (in the form of beta-carotene) and the antioxidant lycopene, known for reducing risk of macular degeneration and prostate cancer. Potassium, which helps muscle and nerve function, regulation of the body's electrolyte and acid-base balance, and reduction of high blood pressure risk, is also a benefit from eating watermelon. With about 92 percent of weight coming from water, watermelon also contributes to fluid intake -- especially important during warm weather. Even with its sweet taste, watermelon fits into a diabetic meal plan. One cup of watermelon has 45 calories and 12 grams of carb. Most watermelons purchased in the West are grown in California and Arizona; Florida, Texas, and Georgia are also leading producer states. Keep cool as a cucumber and include these versatile vegetables into your summer cuisine. One cup of sliced cucumbers has only 16 calories and Continue reading >>

Squash Is Mostly Starchy Carbohydrates But Insulin-regulating - Upi.com

Squash Is Mostly Starchy Carbohydrates But Insulin-regulating - Upi.com

SANTA MONICA, Calif., Nov. 9 (UPI) -- Squash is mostly starchy carbohydrates but studies show it has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties, a U.S. food expert says. "Squash includes both winter and summer varieties, some examples include, zucchini from the summer and butternut, buttercup, acorn, pumpkin and kabocha from winter," Phil Lempert , a food industry analyst, trend watcher and creator of supermarketguru.com, said in a statement. "Many of the carbs in winter starch come from polysaccharides found in the cell walls. These polysaccharides include pectins -- specially structured polysaccharides that in winter squash often include special chains of D-galacturonic acid called homogalacturonan. An increasing number of animal studies now show that these starch-related components in winter squash have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, as well as anti-diabetic and insulin-regulating properties." Although the squash is botanically classified as a fruit, many consider it a vegetable for culinary purposes. The carotenoids, including lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin, give many squash its signature orange color and are good for eye health. Squash contains vitamin C, potassium, fiber, manganese and folate, omega-3 fatty acids, B vitamins and copper. Most varieties of squash start out green and turn orange when ripe but some are actually ripe when green. When choosing for cooking or baking, look for fruits that are heavy for their size with a hard shell, Lempert advised. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Yellow Squash?

Can Diabetics Eat Yellow Squash?

A large pile of yellow crookneck squash.Photo Credit: JannHuizenga/iStock/Getty Images Natalie Stein specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition. She is based in Los Angeles and is an assistant professor with the Program for Public Health at Michigan State University. Stein holds a master of science degree in nutrition and a master of public health degree from Michigan State University. Yellow squash is a general term for a variety of summer squashes that come in shapes that include crookneck, zucchinilike and patty pan. A source of vitamin C, vitamin A, lutein and zeaxanthin, yellow squash can be a regular component of a healthy diet for people with diabetes to control blood sugar levels. Many individuals with diabetes should consume 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal to reduce unhealthy fluctuations in blood sugar levels. A cup of cooked yellow squash contains 6.8 grams of carbohydrates. For breakfast, you could have egg whites scrambled with yellow squash, a whole-grain English muffin and a small pear. Lunch could include soup made with low-sodium beef broth, yellow squash and other vegetables, and 1/2 cup of kidney beans. Have a container of plain, fat-free yogurt and some berries for dessert. For dinner, serve grilled chicken breast with one-half of a large baked potato, yellow squash and a slice of whole-wheat bread. Yellow squash can be healthy for individuals with diabetes because each cup of cooked crookneck squash provides 2 grams of dietary fiber. Dietary fiber helps lower blood sugar levels after you eat a meal, and you should try to consume 14 grams of fiber per 1,000 calories in your diet, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Make a high-fiber side dish with yellow squash, black beans, red bell peppers, chili power and cumin. Continue reading >>

Squash Anyone? - Type2diabetes.com

Squash Anyone? - Type2diabetes.com

Join the conversation. register now or log in About the author View all posts by Meryl Krochmal, RD, CSP, CDE, CNSC Last weekend, while grocery shopping , I was searching for cubed sweet potatoes, but instead I ended up with cubed butternut squash. I often purchase pre-prepped vegetables (and sometimes fruit ) to save time. I was uncertain how my family would respond to the new vegetable; to my delight the squash was a huge success! In a moment of excitement, I decided to share my recipe creation with the type2diabetes.com community. Butternut squash is technically a fruit, as it contains seeds, but is more traditionally served as a vegetable . Squash belongs to the Cucurbitaceaeplant family (gourd family), which also includes cucumbers, pumpkins, and melons. Squash is slightly sweet with a nutty flavor. It has been described as a good cross between a pumpkin and sweet potato . Squash has been sold commercially since 1944 and is now readily available at most grocery stores. Squash has often been labeled, along with potatoes and sweet potatoes, as a starchy vegetable . However, by comparison butternut squash has nearly 40 percent less carbohydrates than potatoes and sweet potatoes. This makes squash a great alternative for those following a lower carb diet. Butternut squash is also rich in antioxidants and fiber: Butternut squash gets bonus points for being rich in antioxidants, Vitamin A and Vitamin C. Antioxidants protect the body from damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals . Many experts believe this damage is a factor in the development of blood vessel disease, cancer , and other conditions. 1 According to researchers, Bajaj and Khan, Hyperglycemia promotes auto-oxidation of glucose to form free radicals.2 Learn more about antioxidants and free radi Continue reading >>

Vegetables That Are Good For Diabetic Dogs

Vegetables That Are Good For Diabetic Dogs

Pet owners have a special responsibility to their pets and their pets' health. When a dog is diagnosed with diabetes, a customized diet is often necessary. Rather than the canned diet that is usually all grains and meats, dogs with diabetes must eat grains and meats in moderation, and owners should include more fresh vegetables in their diets. Various winter squashes such as pumpkin, acorn squash or butternut squash, are beneficial for dogs with diabetes because of their high fiber content. According to VetInfo, diabetes-control diets should be high in carbohydrates with plenty of fiber. However, winter squash should be cooked before being served. Veterinarian Jennifer Fry from AllExperts.com says that alpha sprouts are a high-fiber food that are safe for dogs, making raw alpha sprouts (also known as alfalfa sprouts), mixed in with rice or oats and low-fat meat is an excellent diabetic-friendly dinner. Since alpha sprouts tend to pick up bacteria easily, make sure these sprouts are fresh. While they are sugary, Cushing's and Diabetes, a dog diabetes information site and support group, reports that naturally occurring sugars do not affect the insulin levels the same way that sucrose or fructose additives would. Carrots are safe in moderation, either cooked or raw. If serving your dog raw carrots, be sure to pulp the carrots well to be to be safely swallowed and digested sufficiently. Parsley, like most leafy greens, is high in fiber and low in sugar. It is an ideal vegetable for a diabetic, dog and human alike. Fresh garlic will help the digestive track in addition to being a nutritional addition to a diabetic dog's diet. However, don't go overboard with this additive, and consult your vet before making this a part of your dog's diet. The vet experts at Pet Education rep Continue reading >>

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