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Is Sport Good For Diabetes?

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport About Diabetes Diabeter : Type One Diabetes Care

Diabetes And Sport About Diabetes Diabeter : Type One Diabetes Care

Exercise is healthy and fun. You make friends and it helps you to feel good. If you have diabetes, it is even more healthy. Doing sports makes your insulin work better and you also need less of it. Besides, your glucose is often easier to regulate. But you will inevitably have a bad game every once in a while. Therefore we tell you what it takes to combine diabetes and sporting activities. When you exercise you use energy. This energy reaches your body via glucose. And glucose needs to be well regulated. This is done primarily with insulin. You have to have enough of this in your body, not too little or too much. This means that exercising cannot go without training your diabetes regulation properly. If you learn this well, even with diabetes you can become a champion in any type of sports. Take a look for instance at professional football player Jan-Arie van der Heijden, or former top volleyball player Bas van de Goor . True, it takes some doing. People without diabetes stop almost completely with producing insulin during exercise. This only leaves a small amount of basic insulin in the blood. If you have diabetes it doesnt work this way because you cannot just shut off the insulin from your pump or syringe. And during an important match you do not want to fall victim to a hypo. You might thing youd be better off by being high in your glucose level. But this, combined with having little insulin with you, means your muscles dont get enough glucose and acerbate. Also, your brain works less well, and you also need that when you exercise. What you can do however, is use another type of insulin, or another moment of injection. If you use a pump, you can turn it off beforehand or re-adjust your pump wizard. You can also eat or drink a little extra. There is a number of poss Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't play sports Having diabetes neednt be a barrier to actively enjoying sports and exercise. Sportsmen and women with diabetes are common and have achieved some of the highest sporting awards available on the planet. Famous UK diabetic sports achievers include Steve Redgrave , who has won numerous at the Olympics including his last gold medal which he won after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Sport, or exercise of some form, is recommended for all people with diabetes because it brings a range of health benefits such as improved sensitivity to insulin, improved. Whether you take part in sport for competitive reasons, or purely for fun, it is a great way to stay healthy. Different sports have different effects on blood sugar Different sports can affect the body in different ways. For example, brisk walking and continuous jogging will usually lead to a reliable lowering in blood glucose levels. By contrast, sprinting and some upper body activities can initially lead to rises in blood sugar levels, which will come down if the exercise session is long enough. By testing your blood glucose levels around exercise, you can learn how different sports and session lengths affect your blood sugar levels. For information on how a range of sports effect blood sugar levels and how you can manage this, see the guides on individual sports in this section. You will need to watch out for hypos (too low blood sugar levels) if you are on any of the following diabetes medications: If you take any of these medications then it is important to take precautions to prevent hypos occurring, this may include taking sufficient carbohydrate before or during exercise or reducing your dose of medication prior to exercise. If you are considering changing your Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

Sport Tips For Diabetics

Sport Tips For Diabetics

Participating in a sport as a diabetic takes some planning. The following tips should help diabetics get ready to play sport, whether they are children or adults. Before participating in sport or exercise, diabetics should make their doctors aware of their intentions and take notice of any advice. Testing yourself is crucial. Diabetics taking part in sport should be able to test themselves and take advice from their doctor on when to test blood sugar levels . Diabetics participating in sport may have to test before, during and after exercise. This is also known as self-monitoring . In addition to this, diabetics may also want to: Secure your insulin pump . Before playing sport, make sure that your insulin pump will not be disturbed by the activity. If you cant play a sport because of your insulin pump, consult your doctor. Choose your food carefully. Your doctor will also be able to tell you what to eat as a diabetic taking part in sport. For instance, you may need extra snack food before, during or after playing sport. Make sure you carry snacks and water with you, wherever you are exercising. Take sufficient testing equipment, medication, emergency contact information. Choose your injection site wisely if you are planning to exercise. Dont administer insulin to a part of the body about to be actively used in sport, as this can speed up the blood glucose lowering effect of the injection. Tell people. Dont exercise with people that dont know you are diabetic. There is nothing to be ashamed of, so dont hide it, particularly from teachers or sports coaches. Tell people you have diabetes . Be prepared to stop. Quitting in sport is not usually encouraged, but with diabetes you have to be prepared to stop when your bodys telling you to. In some cases this may be just long e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

An even playing field is all most parents hope for as their children enter organized sports. Most of us dont expect our child to be the next LeBron James, but we do want our young ones to have a shot at success just like everyone else. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If your child has diabetes, it doesnt have to hold him or her back from sports. It just requires that parents, medical staff and coaches work together to ensure optimal health of the young athlete. With proper outpatient management, a winning game plan is doable. Diabetes is incredibly common, says orthopaedic specialist Dominic King, DO . If you have an organized way to coach young athletes, you should have an organized way to treat athletes with diabetes. Control is the operative word, Dr. King says. The management of a child athlete with diabetes is very similar to managing any child who is an athlete, Dr. King says. Just like you watch all athletes for injuries, you have to watch diabetic athletes for hypo- or hyperglycemia. With strict attention to blood glucose concentration, diet and hydration , most sports and activities are fair game for children with diabetes. There are no real limitations to activity, Dr. King says. In fact, there are some specific benefits in regards to improved blood glucose control and an overall healthy lifestyle. There are a few more extreme sporting activities such as rock climbing, skydiving or scuba diving that you would probably want your child to avoid if he or she has diabetes. Dr. King warns against anything that, if you passed out during the activity, you could be in life-threatening danger. Also, make sure that your childs Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Managing Diabetes with Sport, Why is there any problem? Recognised Challenges to Fuel Regulation during Exercise and the Implications for Athletes with Type 1 Diabetes LONG DURATION MODERATE INTENSITY AEROBIC ENDURANCE ACTIVITIES Predisposition to hypoglycaemia after 20-30minuntes if insulin levels are inappropriately high. Overall predisposition to hypoglycaemia during and after exercise. Heart rates at the upper aerobic thresholds result in the highest risk of hypoglycaemia. Risk of Hypoglycaemia typically diminishes after several hours of endurance exercise. SHORT DURATION ANAEROBIC HIGH INTENSITY ACTIVITIES VARIABLES INVOLVING COUNTER-REGULATORY HORMONES Competition stress, heat stress including high humidity, dehydration, high pre-exercise blood glucose and arm exercises may augment counter-regulatory hormone response to exercise predisposing to hyperglycaemia. Repeated episodes of exercise or hypoglycaemia may reduce/impair counter-regulatory hormone response to exercise predisposing to hypoglycaemia. Particular care should be taken to avoid hypoglycaemia if exercising after a recent (antecedent) hypoglycaemic episode. Cold temperatures increase risk of hypoglycaemia. Altitude increases the risk of hypoglycaemia. 1. Longer Duration Moderate Intensity Aerobic Endurance Activities Fuel Regulation in Athletes without Diabetes During moderate intensity aerobic exercise typical of endurance activities, after muscle glycogen stores are depleted hepatic glucose production is essential for homeostasis with insulin and glucagon the major regulators. During exercise a fall in insulin promotes hepatic glycogenolysis whereas a rise in glucagon is also required to achieve maximal hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The effects of insulin and glucagon are additive, ind Continue reading >>

Exercise Plays Key Role In Controlling Diabetes

Exercise Plays Key Role In Controlling Diabetes

Exercise plays key role in controlling diabetes Statistics from the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet reveal that a total of 25.8 million children and adults in the United States, roughly 8.3 percent of the population, have diabetes. Learning more about diabetes can help you recognize warning signs in yourself, or to assist someone who may need immediate attention. Diabetes mellitus is a condition that impairs glucose (blood sugar) metabolism. Glucose is used as the bodys chief energy source, and insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose enter the cells. With diabetes, the cells either dont respond normally to insulin or the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or both. If the cells do not accept glucose, it accumulates in the bloodstream. Complications from diabetes are serious, and can include high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, neuropathy (nervous system disease) and amputation. Studies have indicated that the early detection and treatment can decrease the chance of developing these complications. 3 Who's in Jail | Latest Montgomery County Bookings Unfortunately, diabetes often goes undiagnosed because symptoms can seem harmless. Symptoms may include fatigue, extreme thirst, weight loss, frequent urination and increased vulnerability to infection. There are two main forms of diabetes. The first, Type I, is known as juvenile onset diabetes. In this case, little or no insulin is produced, and insulin injections are needed. Over 90 percent of people with diabetes have Type II, adult onset diabetes. The condition usually comes on after age 40, is most common in females and is linked to both obesity and genetics. Type II diabetes is usually the result of cells not responding to insulin or the pancreas not producing enough of the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Managing Diabetes with Sport, Why is there any problem? Recognised Challenges to Fuel Regulation during Exercise and the Implications for Athletes with Type 1 Diabetes LONG DURATION MODERATE INTENSITY AEROBIC ENDURANCE ACTIVITIES Predisposition to hypoglycaemia after 20-30minuntes if insulin levels are inappropriately high. Overall predisposition to hypoglycaemia during and after exercise. Heart rates at the upper aerobic thresholds result in the highest risk of hypoglycaemia. Risk of Hypoglycaemia typically diminishes after several hours of endurance exercise. SHORT DURATION ANAEROBIC HIGH INTENSITY ACTIVITIES VARIABLES INVOLVING COUNTER-REGULATORY HORMONES Competition stress, heat stress including high humidity, dehydration, high pre-exercise blood glucose and arm exercises may augment counter-regulatory hormone response to exercise predisposing to hyperglycaemia. Repeated episodes of exercise or hypoglycaemia may reduce/impair counter-regulatory hormone response to exercise predisposing to hypoglycaemia. Particular care should be taken to avoid hypoglycaemia if exercising after a recent (antecedent) hypoglycaemic episode. Cold temperatures increase risk of hypoglycaemia. Altitude increases the risk of hypoglycaemia. 1. Longer Duration Moderate Intensity Aerobic Endurance Activities Fuel Regulation in Athletes without Diabetes During moderate intensity aerobic exercise typical of endurance activities, after muscle glycogen stores are depleted hepatic glucose production is essential for homeostasis with insulin and glucagon the major regulators. During exercise a fall in insulin promotes hepatic glycogenolysis whereas a rise in glucagon is also required to achieve maximal hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The effects of insulin and glucagon are additive, ind Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Regular exercise is highly recommended for many people who have either Type 1 DM or Type 2 DM diabetes. During exercise there is a rapid uptake of glucose from the blood and people with diabetes must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake, before, during and after exercise. The benefits of regular exercise in people with diabetes are similar to those in persons without the disease as long as the diabetic is in good glucose control and has no major complications of the disease. Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports People with diabetes mellitusrapidly approaching one-third of the US populationeither cannot produce insulin (Type 1 DM) or the insulin they produce is ineffective in stimulating the uptake of blood sugar (glucose) into the bodys cells (Type 2 DM). Accordingly, if diabetes is untreated, blood sugar rises to dangerously high levels that can eventually cause blindness, nerve damage, and other complications. Blood sugar can be controlled by the appropriate administration of insulin and other drugs and/or by the manipulation of dietary carbohydrate and exercise. During exercise, the contracting muscles produce their own insulin-like effect, causing the rapid uptake of glucose from the blood. In people without diabetes, the body naturally reduces its production of insulin to compensate; otherwise, blood glucose would fall precipitously. (A low blood glucose concentration is known as hypoglycemia.) Those with Type 1 DM (and those with Type 2 DM who use insulin to control their blood sugar) must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and their carbohydrate intake before, during, and after exercise to avoid becoming hypoglycemic. Regular exercise traini Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Diabetes doesn't have to get in the way of exercise and sports competition. A number of accomplished athletes deal with diabetes while competing and exercising. And your child can, too. Like anyone else, kids with diabetes are healthier if they get plenty of exercise , which can actually help them manage their condition. Exercise can offer for kids with diabetes: Better health for life. Exercise strengthens bones and muscles and reduces the risk of heart disease and some types of cancer. Greater physical abilities. With exercise, kids can gain better coordination, balance, strength, and endurance. Exercise can increase energy levels, too. Better response to insulin and better blood sugar control. Exercise makes insulin work better in the body, which helps someone with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels in a healthier range. Weight management. To reach and maintain a healthy weight, just eating right isn't enough — people need to exercise. Exercise burns calories and builds muscle, which in turn helps the body burn more calories. And in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes , having too much body fat keeps insulin from working as well to control blood sugar levels. Life experience. When kids get out of the house and go outdoors or visit a gym, they get a chance to meet new people and have new, interesting experiences. If they try a sport, they also learn about teamwork, sportsmanship , and competition. Increased confidence. Exercise helps boost kids' self-esteem and confidence . By mastering a skill, improving physical abilities, or helping a team, kids see what they're capable of achieving. Mental boost. Exercise can help relieve tension and stress, encourage relaxation, and improve mood. Exercise can even help clear the mind and make it easier to pay att Continue reading >>

Sport & Exercise - Diabetes Australia

Sport & Exercise - Diabetes Australia

Keeping active and taking part in sport is an important part of your diabetes management (as well as being a typical Aussie pastime). Try and make time for regular physical exercise whether its at the gym, going for a walk with the dog, or kicking a footy on the oval with friends. Exercise is your friend! Aside from all the benefits of exercise that health care professionals will tell you, keeping good blood sugar levels is much easier when you're doing regular exercise. It makes life less stressful and the occasional splurge doesn't affect you as much when you're keeping fit! (Anonymous) Stay positive and feel good about yourself My biggest achievement? Being able to continue playing sport and not having it affect me too much. There are some things you need to consider about exercising and diabetes. Dont exercise if you are sick this will only put pressure on your body and your diabetes. You need to focus on getting well first. Recommended amounts of exercise try and do some exercise any time you are willing and able! You need to work out what your goals are. The table below can help you decide what you need to do and how often. Remember to test your blood glucose levels before and after you exercise and it may be necessary to eat something before exercise and have something to snack on when you finish. Another tip is to have someone you are exercising with know what to do if you have a hypo. There are lots of different ways of getting your exercise. Try to vary what you do and youll be less likely to get bored and more likely to stick with a fitness program. Heres a selection of activities you could do: walking, jogging, cycling, dancing, aerobics, and even household chores, such as gardening and cleaning! And if you are really into your sports (and preferably live i Continue reading >>

In The Spotlight: Sports And Type 1 Diabetes

In The Spotlight: Sports And Type 1 Diabetes

Sports used to be a big part of Jonathan Tengi’s life. The 14-year-old from Allendale, NJ, played soccer, basketball and baseball, and swam on a team during the summer. Then Jonathan was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. His active schedule came to a complete halt — he even missed the last soccer match of the season. Three weeks later, with his blood sugar levels under better control and a diabetes management plan in place, Jonathan was back in the game again, in time for basketball season. He was hitting his stride, learning to live with diabetes — something he says he couldn’t have done without his teammates. “Playing sports was a huge help physically and mentally, because when I was diagnosed, it threw everything off. Being able to get back into sports really helped me keep my mind off my diabetes and feel more normal,” he says. Diabetes experts agree: Physical activity is vital to staying healthy for all kids, including those with type 1 diabetes. Here’s why and what you need to know to even the playing field for your child. Strong Minds and Bodies Exercise helps kids concentrate in school. It’s good for their hearts, for building muscles, and for controlling weight and stress. The optimal amount of exercise for children with type 1 diabetes — about an hour per day — isn’t any different than for other children, says Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist and Professor of Exercise Science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. Improved Self-esteem “A chronic disease can have a negative influence on how children view themselves, but being physically active may help counteract that by increasing self-confidence,” Colberg says. Participating in team sports had an added bonus: It gave Jonathan a chance to educate his friends about his Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

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