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Is Sport Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise And Competitive Sports

Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports Regular exercise is highly recommended for many people who have either Type 1 DM or Type 2 DM diabetes. During exercise there is a rapid uptake of glucose from the blood and people with diabetes must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake, before, during and after exercise. The benefits of regular exercise in people with diabetes are similar to those in persons without the disease as long as the diabetic is in good glucose control and has no major complications of the disease. Diabetes, Exercise and Competitive Sports People with diabetes mellitusrapidly approaching one-third of the US populationeither cannot produce insulin (Type 1 DM) or the insulin they produce is ineffective in stimulating the uptake of blood sugar (glucose) into the bodys cells (Type 2 DM). Accordingly, if diabetes is untreated, blood sugar rises to dangerously high levels that can eventually cause blindness, nerve damage, and other complications. Blood sugar can be controlled by the appropriate administration of insulin and other drugs and/or by the manipulation of dietary carbohydrate and exercise. During exercise, the contracting muscles produce their own insulin-like effect, causing the rapid uptake of glucose from the blood. In people without diabetes, the body naturally reduces its production of insulin to compensate; otherwise, blood glucose would fall precipitously. (A low blood glucose concentration is known as hypoglycemia.) Those with Type 1 DM (and those with Type 2 DM who use insulin to control their blood sugar) must adjust their pre-exercise insulin dosage and their carbohydrate intake before, during, and after exercise to avoid becoming hypoglycemic. Regular exercise traini Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't play sports Having diabetes neednt be a barrier to actively enjoying sports and exercise. Sportsmen and women with diabetes are common and have achieved some of the highest sporting awards available on the planet. Famous UK diabetic sports achievers include Steve Redgrave , who has won numerous at the Olympics including his last gold medal which he won after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Sport, or exercise of some form, is recommended for all people with diabetes because it brings a range of health benefits such as improved sensitivity to insulin, improved. Whether you take part in sport for competitive reasons, or purely for fun, it is a great way to stay healthy. Different sports have different effects on blood sugar Different sports can affect the body in different ways. For example, brisk walking and continuous jogging will usually lead to a reliable lowering in blood glucose levels. By contrast, sprinting and some upper body activities can initially lead to rises in blood sugar levels, which will come down if the exercise session is long enough. By testing your blood glucose levels around exercise, you can learn how different sports and session lengths affect your blood sugar levels. For information on how a range of sports effect blood sugar levels and how you can manage this, see the guides on individual sports in this section. You will need to watch out for hypos (too low blood sugar levels) if you are on any of the following diabetes medications: If you take any of these medications then it is important to take precautions to prevent hypos occurring, this may include taking sufficient carbohydrate before or during exercise or reducing your dose of medication prior to exercise. If you are considering changing your Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't play sports Having diabetes neednt be a barrier to actively enjoying sports and exercise. Sportsmen and women with diabetes are common and have achieved some of the highest sporting awards available on the planet. Famous UK diabetic sports achievers include Steve Redgrave , who has won numerous at the Olympics including his last gold medal which he won after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Sport, or exercise of some form, is recommended for all people with diabetes because it brings a range of health benefits such as improved sensitivity to insulin, improved. Whether you take part in sport for competitive reasons, or purely for fun, it is a great way to stay healthy. Different sports have different effects on blood sugar Different sports can affect the body in different ways. For example, brisk walking and continuous jogging will usually lead to a reliable lowering in blood glucose levels. By contrast, sprinting and some upper body activities can initially lead to rises in blood sugar levels, which will come down if the exercise session is long enough. By testing your blood glucose levels around exercise, you can learn how different sports and session lengths affect your blood sugar levels. For information on how a range of sports effect blood sugar levels and how you can manage this, see the guides on individual sports in this section. You will need to watch out for hypos (too low blood sugar levels) if you are on any of the following diabetes medications: If you take any of these medications then it is important to take precautions to prevent hypos occurring, this may include taking sufficient carbohydrate before or during exercise or reducing your dose of medication prior to exercise. If you are considering changing your Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Diabetes doesn't have to get in the way of exercise and sports competition. A number of accomplished athletes deal with diabetes while competing and exercising. And your child can, too. Like anyone else, kids with diabetes are healthier if they get plenty of exercise , which can actually help them manage their condition. Exercise can offer for kids with diabetes: Better health for life. Exercise strengthens bones and muscles and reduces the risk of heart disease and some types of cancer. Greater physical abilities. With exercise, kids can gain better coordination, balance, strength, and endurance. Exercise can increase energy levels, too. Better response to insulin and better blood sugar control. Exercise makes insulin work better in the body, which helps someone with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels in a healthier range. Weight management. To reach and maintain a healthy weight, just eating right isn't enough — people need to exercise. Exercise burns calories and builds muscle, which in turn helps the body burn more calories. And in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes , having too much body fat keeps insulin from working as well to control blood sugar levels. Life experience. When kids get out of the house and go outdoors or visit a gym, they get a chance to meet new people and have new, interesting experiences. If they try a sport, they also learn about teamwork, sportsmanship , and competition. Increased confidence. Exercise helps boost kids' self-esteem and confidence . By mastering a skill, improving physical abilities, or helping a team, kids see what they're capable of achieving. Mental boost. Exercise can help relieve tension and stress, encourage relaxation, and improve mood. Exercise can even help clear the mind and make it easier to pay att Continue reading >>

The Best Sports For Type 2 Diabetes | Patient

The Best Sports For Type 2 Diabetes | Patient

If you have type 2 diabetes , you probably already know the benefits of getting active. Regular exercise will help you maintain a healthy weight and regulate your blood glucose levels, as well as helping reduce your risk of diabetes-related complications. For people who don't yet have diabetes, but have been told they're at high risk , there is an even greater incentive. According to the UK Chief Medical Officers Guidelines , physical activity can slash your chance of type 2 diabetes by up to 40%. In our recent survey of 281 health professionals, a number of different physical activities were highly recommended by doctors. Top of the list were cycling (recommended by 71% of doctors), badminton (67%), and gymnastics/dance/Zumba (64%). All of these are fun aerobic exercises likely to get your heart rate up. The least recommended sports were skiing/snowboarding (40%), skateboarding/rollerblading (38%) and rugby(37%) - perhaps because older adults with type 2 diabetes are at particular risk of falls . We asked healthcare professionals which are the best sports for type 2 diabetes As Kathryn Kirchner, clinical advisor at Diabetes UK , explains, people with type 2 diabetes should be encouraged to do any sport or activity they enjoy, within the parameters of what is safe for them. "Certain activities or movements might need to be avoided in the case of some diabetes complications or other medical conditions," she says. "Getting individualised exercise advice from a physiotherapist can be helpful, especially if you have existing injuries or medical conditions that make it hard to exercise." If youre planning on exercising vigorously, it is important to think about how this will affect your blood sugar levels. Diabetes UK advises that, if your blood sugar levels are below 7 mmo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

An even playing field is all most parents hope for as their children enter organized sports. Most of us dont expect our child to be the next LeBron James, but we do want our young ones to have a shot at success just like everyone else. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If your child has diabetes, it doesnt have to hold him or her back from sports. It just requires that parents, medical staff and coaches work together to ensure optimal health of the young athlete. With proper outpatient management, a winning game plan is doable. Diabetes is incredibly common, says orthopaedic specialist Dominic King, DO . If you have an organized way to coach young athletes, you should have an organized way to treat athletes with diabetes. Control is the operative word, Dr. King says. The management of a child athlete with diabetes is very similar to managing any child who is an athlete, Dr. King says. Just like you watch all athletes for injuries, you have to watch diabetic athletes for hypo- or hyperglycemia. With strict attention to blood glucose concentration, diet and hydration , most sports and activities are fair game for children with diabetes. There are no real limitations to activity, Dr. King says. In fact, there are some specific benefits in regards to improved blood glucose control and an overall healthy lifestyle. There are a few more extreme sporting activities such as rock climbing, skydiving or scuba diving that you would probably want your child to avoid if he or she has diabetes. Dr. King warns against anything that, if you passed out during the activity, you could be in life-threatening danger. Also, make sure that your childs Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Endurance Sports

Diabetes And Endurance Sports

Published September 6, 2017 Regular, moderate exercise can help prevent Type 2 diabetes and reduce or slow complications from Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. But what about more intense physical activity such as endurance sports including marathons and triathlons? With healthy training and nutrition management to meet individualized goals, people with diabetes can achieve improved blood glucose control and fewer hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes while participating in endurance sports. When it comes to sports, diabetes management always is the first priority. First, talk to your diabetes doctor about an insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor and pre-training medical testing. Determine your safe blood glucose range for training and competing. Once you've gotten the go-ahead from your doctor, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in sports and diabetes care. Avoiding hypoglycemia is important before, during and after endurance training. If blood sugar is 70 to 100 mg/dl before exercise, then a snack that includes 15 grams of carbohydrate is recommended. For exercise that lasts longer than 60 minutes, additional carbohydrate may be needed to keep blood sugar within a safe range. When starting an endurance sport, follow these five tips: Check your blood sugar frequently, and stay in the blood glucose range that you and your physician decide upon. Always carry a quickly absorbable form of glucose glucose tablets, sports drinks, gels or energy bars when training. Train with a partner until you are skilled at avoiding hypoglycemia. Wear a medical alert ID bracelet, or any medical tag that helps alert paramedics or emergency responders of your diabetes and any additional important medical condition that may require immediate or special attention. Eat and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sport

Diabetes And Sport

Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't play sports Having diabetes neednt be a barrier to actively enjoying sports and exercise. Sportsmen and women with diabetes are common and have achieved some of the highest sporting awards available on the planet. Famous UK diabetic sports achievers include Steve Redgrave , who has won numerous at the Olympics including his last gold medal which he won after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Sport, or exercise of some form, is recommended for all people with diabetes because it brings a range of health benefits such as improved sensitivity to insulin, improved. Whether you take part in sport for competitive reasons, or purely for fun, it is a great way to stay healthy. Different sports have different effects on blood sugar Different sports can affect the body in different ways. For example, brisk walking and continuous jogging will usually lead to a reliable lowering in blood glucose levels. By contrast, sprinting and some upper body activities can initially lead to rises in blood sugar levels, which will come down if the exercise session is long enough. By testing your blood glucose levels around exercise, you can learn how different sports and session lengths affect your blood sugar levels. For information on how a range of sports effect blood sugar levels and how you can manage this, see the guides on individual sports in this section. You will need to watch out for hypos (too low blood sugar levels) if you are on any of the following diabetes medications: If you take any of these medications then it is important to take precautions to prevent hypos occurring, this may include taking sufficient carbohydrate before or during exercise or reducing your dose of medication prior to exercise. If you are considering changing your Continue reading >>

Exercise Plays Key Role In Controlling Diabetes

Exercise Plays Key Role In Controlling Diabetes

Exercise plays key role in controlling diabetes Statistics from the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet reveal that a total of 25.8 million children and adults in the United States, roughly 8.3 percent of the population, have diabetes. Learning more about diabetes can help you recognize warning signs in yourself, or to assist someone who may need immediate attention. Diabetes mellitus is a condition that impairs glucose (blood sugar) metabolism. Glucose is used as the bodys chief energy source, and insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose enter the cells. With diabetes, the cells either dont respond normally to insulin or the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or both. If the cells do not accept glucose, it accumulates in the bloodstream. Complications from diabetes are serious, and can include high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, neuropathy (nervous system disease) and amputation. Studies have indicated that the early detection and treatment can decrease the chance of developing these complications. 3 Who's in Jail | Latest Montgomery County Bookings Unfortunately, diabetes often goes undiagnosed because symptoms can seem harmless. Symptoms may include fatigue, extreme thirst, weight loss, frequent urination and increased vulnerability to infection. There are two main forms of diabetes. The first, Type I, is known as juvenile onset diabetes. In this case, little or no insulin is produced, and insulin injections are needed. Over 90 percent of people with diabetes have Type II, adult onset diabetes. The condition usually comes on after age 40, is most common in females and is linked to both obesity and genetics. Type II diabetes is usually the result of cells not responding to insulin or the pancreas not producing enough of the Continue reading >>

Sport & Exercise - Diabetes Australia

Sport & Exercise - Diabetes Australia

Keeping active and taking part in sport is an important part of your diabetes management (as well as being a typical Aussie pastime). Try and make time for regular physical exercise whether its at the gym, going for a walk with the dog, or kicking a footy on the oval with friends. Exercise is your friend! Aside from all the benefits of exercise that health care professionals will tell you, keeping good blood sugar levels is much easier when you're doing regular exercise. It makes life less stressful and the occasional splurge doesn't affect you as much when you're keeping fit! (Anonymous) Stay positive and feel good about yourself My biggest achievement? Being able to continue playing sport and not having it affect me too much. There are some things you need to consider about exercising and diabetes. Dont exercise if you are sick this will only put pressure on your body and your diabetes. You need to focus on getting well first. Recommended amounts of exercise try and do some exercise any time you are willing and able! You need to work out what your goals are. The table below can help you decide what you need to do and how often. Remember to test your blood glucose levels before and after you exercise and it may be necessary to eat something before exercise and have something to snack on when you finish. Another tip is to have someone you are exercising with know what to do if you have a hypo. There are lots of different ways of getting your exercise. Try to vary what you do and youll be less likely to get bored and more likely to stick with a fitness program. Heres a selection of activities you could do: walking, jogging, cycling, dancing, aerobics, and even household chores, such as gardening and cleaning! And if you are really into your sports (and preferably live i Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

Physical Activity For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Physical Activity For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Children, regardless if they have type 1 diabetes, need to be active. Teaching the importance of exercise and physical activity early on will form healthy habits that will serve your child well into adulthood. But physical activity also impacts blood glucose (blood sugar) levels, and as a parent, you need to know how to respond to these changes. This article explains how to incorporate physical activity into your child's routine and keep his and her blood glucose level within a stable range. For people with diabetes, being active provides a slew of important health benefits. These include lowering blood glucose levels and improving your body's ability to use insulin. In essence, exercise helps your child control his or her diabetes. And in the long run, this will reduce the chances of your child experiencing certain health problems related to diabetes. You can read more about the benefits of physical activity for people with type 1 diabetes in our article about exercise and type 1 diabetes. Activities for Your Child with Type 1 Diabetes Being active is most beneficial when it's done on a regular basis. That's why you should find out what activities most interest your child. If your child actually enjoys the activity, then it greatly increases the odds that he or she will continue to participate. If your child is interested in sports, then sign him or her up for a school or summer sports league. But don't worry if your child doesn't want to participate in an organized activity. Your child can be just as active in your own backyard as on a sports field. Encourage your child to play outside with friends, ride a bike, or walk the dog. Also, take advantage of the many opportunities you have each day to set a good example for your child. Take the stairs instead of the elevato Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Endurance Sports

Diabetes And Endurance Sports

Published September 6, 2017 Regular, moderate exercise can help prevent Type 2 diabetes and reduce or slow complications from Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. But what about more intense physical activity such as endurance sports including marathons and triathlons? With healthy training and nutrition management to meet individualized goals, people with diabetes can achieve improved blood glucose control and fewer hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes while participating in endurance sports. When it comes to sports, diabetes management always is the first priority. First, talk to your diabetes doctor about an insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor and pre-training medical testing. Determine your safe blood glucose range for training and competing. Once you've gotten the go-ahead from your doctor, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist specializing in sports and diabetes care. Avoiding hypoglycemia is important before, during and after endurance training. If blood sugar is 70 to 100 mg/dl before exercise, then a snack that includes 15 grams of carbohydrate is recommended. For exercise that lasts longer than 60 minutes, additional carbohydrate may be needed to keep blood sugar within a safe range. When starting an endurance sport, follow these five tips: Check your blood sugar frequently, and stay in the blood glucose range that you and your physician decide upon. Always carry a quickly absorbable form of glucose glucose tablets, sports drinks, gels or energy bars when training. Train with a partner until you are skilled at avoiding hypoglycemia. Wear a medical alert ID bracelet, or any medical tag that helps alert paramedics or emergency responders of your diabetes and any additional important medical condition that may require immediate or special attention. Eat and Continue reading >>

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