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Is Sodium Bad For Type 2 Diabetes?

High-salt Diet Doubles Heart Risk In Type 2 Diabetes

High-salt Diet Doubles Heart Risk In Type 2 Diabetes

High-Salt Diet Doubles Heart Risk in Type 2 Diabetes People with Type 2 diabetes who eat a high-sodium diet have twice the risk of developing cardiovascular disease as those who consume less salt, according to new research published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading causes of death among people who have diabetes. Many guidelines recommend that people with Type 2 reduce their sodium intake, but few studies have explored the link between sodium intake and diabetes complications in this population. To evaluate this relationship, researchers in Japan surveyed 1,588 subjects ages 4070 from the Japan Diabetes Complications Study who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and who had an A1C level (a measure of glucose control over the previous 23 months) of 6.5% or higher. The participants filled out a Food Frequency Questionnaire about their diets, including sodium intake, and were then followed for eight years to determine their risk of various diabetes complications, including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, eye disease, and all-cause death. Dividing the participants into four groups based on their sodium consumption, the researchers found that those who ate the highest amount of sodium an average of 5.9 grams a day, or roughly 2 1/2 teaspoons of salt had double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease as those who ate the lowest amount of sodium an average of 2.8 grams a day, or slightly more than one teaspoon of salt. They additionally found that every 1-gram increase of salt per day was associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel disease. Further breaking the groups down according to blood sugar control, the researchers found that heart risk was significantly higher fo Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Reducing Dietary Sodium And Hidden Sources To Know

Reducing Dietary Sodium And Hidden Sources To Know

For many people, consuming too much sodium may contribute to high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular issues, and it may also lead to fluid retention and bloating. If you're sensitive to sodium, decreasing the amount of added salt and ingredients that contain sodium that you consume may help keep your blood pressure at a healthier level. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020 , these groups of people should limit their sodium intake to less than 1,500 milligrams per day: Anyone not included in that large group should stay under 2,300 milligrams per day, which is not easy if you eat any processed foods at alleven some that are otherwise good for you. Look at the Nutrition Facts label for the amount of sodium per serving. The recommended amount of sodium is 2,300 milligrams per day. If you're on a salt-restricted diet, stay under 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. How Much Sodium Should You Have in Your Diet? One teaspoon of salt has about 2,300 milligrams sodium. Just one-quarter teaspoon has 580 milligrams, and a dash of salt has around 150 milligrams. While salt is a primary source, many processed foods are high in sodium, too. Canned foods, frozen meals, cured meats, and many other processed foods contain outrageous amounts of sodium, both from salt used to flavor the foods and food additives and preservatives that contain sodium in various forms.You'll find sodium in most butter or margarine, milk, bread, and other staple foods. Obviously, look for salt on food labels. But also look for these ingredients, which contain sodium: Your body needs some sodium, so you don't want to eliminate it entirely from your diet, although doing so is an almost impossible feat. You can reduce your overall i Continue reading >>

Is Salt Bad For Diabetics? | Everyday Health

Is Salt Bad For Diabetics? | Everyday Health

Diabetes and Salt: How Much Is Safe and How to Limit It in Your Diet You need the mineral in your diabetes diet, but too much can be dangerous. Heres how to know when youve hit your sodium limit, and how to sleuth out all the sneaky places it hides. Salt may be hiding in everything from your bread to your cheese, and too much of the ingredient can harm your heart, a particular concern when you have diabetes. Ina Peters/Stocksy; Kristin Duvall/Getty Images; Thinkstock When you were diagnosed with diabetes, one of your first concerns was probably how you were going to monitor your carbohydrate intake. So you thought about potatoes, bread, pasta, and even fruit. But theres actually another nutrient that everyone with type 2 diabetes should have on their radar: sodium. Its true that our bodies need sodium, as its a necessary electrolyte , a mineral that regulates your bodys fluid balance, and helps ensure proper muscle and nerve function. Problem is, 89 percent of adults get too much, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) . When your body cant shed the excess sodium, it can cause high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease. Diabetes and Heart Disease: What to Know About Your Risk The statistics linking diabetes and heart disease are enough to get you to put down the soy sauce for good. According to the American Heart Association (AHA) , adults with diabetes are up to 4 times more likely to die from heart disease compared with those who don't havediabetes. That could be because people with type 2 diabetes may have certain risk factors that make them more prone to cardiovascular disease, like having high blood pressure, having highLDL, or bad, cholesterol, carrying excess weight, and living a more sedentary lifestyle. Research b Continue reading >>

Cutting Down On Salt

Cutting Down On Salt

It's important that people with diabetes lower salt intake, as all too often diabetes is complicated by high blood pressure, a major cause of both heart disease and stroke. Here's how to cut back on salt—without cutting back on flavor—for people with diabetes. How Much is Too Much? We're not suggesting that you banish salt from your diet. The components of salt, sodium and chloride, are essential nutrients, and with potassium, they are the main regulators of the body's water-balance system. The average person in the United States consumes 1 tablespoon of salt a day, which is about 20 times the amount of sodium really needed. The American Diabetes Association recommends 2,300 mg of sodium or less as a maximum daily intake for people with diabetes. That is roughly equivalent to one teaspoon of salt. If you have hypertension (high blood pressure), your healthcare provider may suggest even less. Check with your diabetes health care team for their recommendations for you. We're fortunate that many food manufacturers are recognizing the public's growing concern about salt and have begun to offer "reduced salt" or "no salt" alternatives. Restaurant owners are also more willing to prepare food with less salt, especially when asked to do so. How DiabeticLifestyle Helps You Cut Back on Salt Here on this website, we use salt as an optional ingredient in most recipes, calling for it in small amounts when necessary, such as in baked goods. Reduced sodium versions of soy sauce, canned tomatoes, and canned chicken or beef broth are always called for. Naturally salty foods such as anchovies, capers, dill pickles, canned tuna, etc. are used in moderation. How to Use Less Salt Here are some ways to keep salt under control: Cook without salt, and taste the food before adding it after Continue reading >>

Why Too Much Salt Could Be Extra Harmful For Diabetics

Why Too Much Salt Could Be Extra Harmful For Diabetics

A diet loaded with salt is associated with double the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with type 2 diabetes. HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A diet loaded with salt is associated with double the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with type 2 diabetes. The risk skyrockets even higher among those whose diabetes isn't well-managed, a new Japanese study reports. The study found that people with diabetes who consumed an average of 5.9 grams of sodium daily had double the risk of developing heart disease than those who consumed, on average, 2.8 grams of sodium daily. In addition, heart disease risk jumped nearly 10-fold for people with poorly managed type 2 diabetes and a diet with excess salt. However, it's important to note that this study only found an association between salt intake and increased heart disease; the study wasn't designed to prove that the increased salt intake actually caused heart disease. Still, experts believe it's important to limit salt in the diet. "The findings are very important from a public health point of view," said Dr. Prakash Deedwania, chief of cardiology for the Veterans Administration Central California Health Care System and a professor at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine. "Everyone's focused on controlling glucose [blood sugar] to prevent diabetes complications. Salt intake is not as well emphasized, but this shows it should be reduced as well," said Deedwania, a member of the American College of Cardiology's Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee. The study highlights the need for people with diabetes to track more than just carbohydrates when managing their daily diet, said Deedwania. Public health officials previously have established a link between diab Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Salt?

Can You Get Diabetes From Salt?

What does sodium have to do with your risk of type 2 diabetes? Its well-known that a poor diet, inactivity, and obesity are all associated with type 2 diabetes . Some people think that the amount of sodium you consume also plays a role. But in reality, eating too much sodium doesnt directly cause diabetes. The relationship between salt and diabetes is more complex. Sodium is responsible for controlling the balance of fluids in your body and helps maintain a normal blood volume and blood pressure. Consuming too much salt can raise blood pressure, resulting in fluid retention. This can cause swelling in the feet and other health issues that are very harmful to people with diabetes. If you have diabetes or prediabetes , the amount of sodium you consume can worsen your condition by causing hypertension (high blood pressure). Those with diabetes or prediabetes are at a greater risk of high blood pressure, which can make a person more susceptible to heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease. While many natural foods contain salt, most Americans consume sodium through table salt, which is added during cooking or processing. The average American consumes 5 or more teaspoons of salt daily, which is about 20 times as much salt than whats needed by the body. The saltiest foods are those that are processed or canned. Foods sold in restaurants or as fast food also tend to be very salty. Here are some common high-sodium foods: meat, fish, or poultry thats been cured, canned, salted, or smoked, including: bacon, cold cuts, ham, frankfurters, sausage, sardines, caviar, and anchovies frozen dinners and breaded meats, including pizza, burritos, and chicken nuggets canned meals, including baked beans, chili, ravioli, soups, and spam canned vegetables, stocks, and broths with salt added c Continue reading >>

Sodium And Diabetes

Sodium And Diabetes

found naturally in the soil and the ocean and is an , meaning the body requires it in the diet. When sodium is combined chemically or naturally with another mineral (chloride), it forms a salt (about 40% sodium and 60% chloride). So different varieties of table salt are sodium chloride.' Whereas you can find sodium in food sources, too. We'll get to this in just a moment. We need sodium for a variety of important functions in the body: to help regulate blood pressure, maintain pH balance, conduct nerve impulses, and contract/relax muscles. Though while we do need sodium, the majority of people in Western countries consume excessive amountsso much so that blood pressure is elevated beyond what is healthy (130/85), putting people at risk for heart disease and stroke, the number one cause of overall death and diabetes related death. Populations at higher risk include: African Americans, those over the age of 50, and those with diabetes, kidney disease or hypertension. over recommended sodium restrictions, the strongest evidence to date suggests that reducing intake to 2300 (general population) or possible 1500 mg/day (for those at high risk) helps. Lowering sodium intake below 1500 mg/day poses no additional benefit and may, in fact, increase risk for a variety of health issues. Sodium is found naturally in all plant and animal foods and even in unfiltered water sources. Therefore it is neither possible, nor would it be wise, to attempt a no sodium or salt free diet. If you're curious about how much sodium is in a given food, check the label, and remember to check the serving size! Or use 1500-2300 mg/day is a recommended general range . If a product is >400 mg per entree serving, put it back on the shelf and keep looking for a better option. is probably the most common f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetic Foods To Eat And Stay Away From | Diabetic Supplies Online

Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetic Foods To Eat And Stay Away From | Diabetic Supplies Online

Expanding on the List of Foods for a Diabetic to Eat Taking it a step further, if you want to super boost your diabetic diet, or any other diet for that matter, here are some other items to include on the list of foods for a diabetic to eat: * Foods high in Omega-3; a favorite among many is salmon, but other fish contains Omega-3, too. Preparation is important; breaded and fried should be avoided. Wiser preparation methods include sauting, baking, or broiling. * Tomatoes - whether sliced, sauced, or in a vegetable smoothie, tomatoes provide iron and vitamins C and E. * Berries - raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, and strawberries are excellent for providing antioxidants along with fiber and essential nutrients. Want a fast healthy dessert? Place non-fat vanilla yogurt in a parfait glass alternating from bottom to top with yogurt and your choice of berries; mix different types of berries for more color and variety. Sprinkle the top with wheat germ and/or crushed nuts. * Sweet Potatoes - consider replacing white potatoes with sweet potatoes for a lower glycemic index value. Sweet potatoes are loaded with vitamin A and fiber, and they are easily to bake, or boil in water and mash for a delicious sweet potato casserole. * Dark Leafy Greens - you can't go wrong with dark leafy greens such as kale, collards, and spinach, plus they are low in both carbohydrates and calories and provide you with fiber, calcium, iron, and vitamins C, A, and K. Some of the foods you will want to avoid on a diabetic diet include: * White bread, pasta, and rice; opt for whole grain choices instead * Red meat; opt for fish, eggs, or poultry instead * Butter; choose healthier plant oils instead (olive, canola, peanut, sunflower) While a dietician or nutritionist is your best source of advice fo Continue reading >>

Dietary Sodium Intake In Type 2 Diabetes

Dietary Sodium Intake In Type 2 Diabetes

Laura Ferreira Provenzano , MD, Sue Stark , MS, RD, CSR, LDN, Ann Steenkiste , MS, Beth Piraino , MD, and Mary Ann Sevick , ScD, RN All of the authors were affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania at the time of writing. Laura Ferreira Provenzano, MD, is currently an associate staff member in the Nephrology and Hypertension Department of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Sue Stark, MS, RD, CSR, LDN, is a dietitian specialist at UPMC Presbyterian-Shadyside in Pittsburgh. Ann Steenkiste, MS, is a statistician in Pittsburgh, PA. Beth Piraino, MD, is a professor of medicine and associate dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Mary Ann Sevick, ScD, RN, is a professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City. Copyright 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Superimposed hypertension further increases the risk and is associated with increased dietary sodium intake. There are few data available on dietary sodium intake in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to quantify dietary sodium intake in a cohort of self-referred patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify sociodemographic characteristics associated with it. Sodium intake in this cohort was far greater than current recommendations. Increased awareness of sodium intake in this population might lead to target interventions to reduce sodium intake and potentially improve long-term outcomes. Patients with type 2 diabetes are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), and CVD risks are even higher in those with concurrent hypertension. 1 4 This is of Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Too Much Salt Could Increase Diabetes Risk

Too Much Salt Could Increase Diabetes Risk

Too much salt could increase diabetes risk The threat on your plate: salt may significantly increase the risk of developing different forms of diabetes. Researchers suggest that sodium - which we commonly ingest through salt, or sodium chloride - could increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. Diabetes is a common condition that affects more than 29 million people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Type 2 diabetes accounts for up to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases and is characterized by abnormal levels of blood sugar. This type of diabetes is most often diagnosed in middle-aged and senior people. Another metabolic condition called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is often misdiagnosed as type 2 diabetes; it also appears later in adulthood. LADA is a more slowly progressing disease, and it does not initially require insulin treatment. A new study conducted by Dr. Bahareh Rasouli, of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden - in collaboration with researchers from other Swedish and Finnish institutions - now looks at the impact of sodium intake on the risk of type 2 diabetes and LADA. The researchers havepresented their findings at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes , held in Lisbon, Portugal. Existing research had already suggested that the sodium we usually absorb from our daily intake of salt may significantly increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The team explains that thismay be because sodium impacts insulin resistance , but also because excess salt can lead to hypertension and gaining excess weight. Butuntil now, no studies had looked at the impact of sodium intake Continue reading >>

Sodium And People With Diabetes

Sodium And People With Diabetes

The average American consumes about 6 to 18 grams (or 1 to 3 teaspoons) of ordinary table salt (or sodium chloride) each day. People with diabetes are encouraged to limit the sodium in their diets to help prevent or to control high blood pressure. The2015 recommendations by the U.S. Department of Agriculture instruct youto limit your sodiumintake to less than2,300 mg per day. The recommended daily sodium intake is1,500 mgfor African Americans and for people diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease, as well as those ages 51and older.Note that the American Heart Association (AHA)takes an even more conservative approach to sodium intake.The AHA recommends a maximum daily sodium intake of 1,500 mg. Unless your healthcare provider has told you that this intake level doesn't apply to you, the AHA recommends it for everyone,regardless ofage, medical history, or ethnic background.Lowering your salt intake may help you avoid taking medicines for blood pressure. Most foods contain some sodium, but sodium is often added during the processing of prepared and prepackaged food products. Some examples of foods that are high in sodium include the following: Meats, such as bacon, breakfast sausage,ham, cold cuts (bologna), Canadian bacon, corned beef, hot dogs, Polish and Italian sausages Fish, such as canned tuna, salmon, and sardines; commercially frozen, prebreaded, or smoked fish; and canned shellfish Canned foods, such as vegetables, soups, vegetable and tomato juices Prepared or premixed products, such as boxed macaroni and cheese, potato mixes, TV dinners, frozen entrees Snacks, such as salted crackers, pretzels, potato chips, commercially prepared baked goods (for example, cookies and doughnuts) Other foods, such as olives, pickles, commercially prepared Continue reading >>

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