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Is Smart Balance Butter Good For Diabetes

Mailbag: Smart Balance Versus Butter

Mailbag: Smart Balance Versus Butter

Featured , Mailbag , Posts Authored by John Serrao We are having a discussion about whether buttery spread such as Smart Balance is better than using butter?!?! Smart Balance is not good for you in the relative scheme of things. It is a chemical conglomeration of esterified oils which means they take all these different oils, blast them apart, combine them with caking agents which come together to form this new age margarine. Its WAAAY better than old fashioned margarine, made from trans fat, but still not a natural food. That stuff about the flaxseed oil helping is really nonsense processing destroys the bioavailabilty of omega-3s. Ideally, you want to eat your essential fats, that is Omega3 and Omega6, in a 1:1 ratio. Most Americans get about 15-20X more Omega6 than Omega3, precisely because of this processing problem. Omega3 is very sensitive it will degrade at room temperature even and only in a small number of foods (flax, walnuts, wild salmon). Omega 6 is everywhere and stands up to heat and processing much betterso you can see where this goes. Smart Balance will have a high Omega6:3 ratio making it an inflammatory food. We would much rather see you eating butter, but realize the type of butter you are eating here is key. You really want to find butter from grass fed cows. This type of butter will tend to be a bright yellow orange the more orange the better. This is an outward indication the cows feed on grass, which is rich in beta-carrotene an orange flavonoid that will tint your butter (it will be more orange in the spring, when grass first starts to grow). This is an unrefined, real food that contains high amounts of omega3 fats along with a dizzying array of vitamins and minerals all very bioavailable. Try and find Raw, Grass Fed butter if you can this is ev Continue reading >>

Is Margarine Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Margarine Safe For People With Diabetes?

Nutritional recommendations always seem to be changing. Oneyear we’re advised to switch from butter to margarine. A year later, we learn that margarine is worse for us than butter. With all the conflicting information, it’s not surprising that many people are often confused. Margarine and the Trans Fat Bad Rap Margarines are notoriously high in trans fats. Onceit was discovered that trans fats are as bad for youas saturated fats (if not worse), margarine got a badrap. Manufacturers responded to these concerns bydeveloping trans fat free margarines, but they had toreplace this emulsifying ingredient with a long list ofother ingredients. But are these ingredients safe? Is butter still thebetter alternative? The problem is that the body treats trans fat as if itwere a saturated fat. Trans fats have adverse actionson lipid profiles because they raise LDL (“bad”)cholesterol and decrease HDL (“good”) cholesterol.A study published in the Journal of Nutrition alsofound that trans fats negatively affect plasmamarkers of inflammation and reduce endothelialfunction, effects that are associated with an increasedcardiovascular disease risk. This is particularly important for people withdiabetes. Since they already have an elevated riskof cardiovascular disease, diabetics need to takeprecautions to ensure that all controllable aspects ofhealth are practiced. There is no recommended intake for trans fats; however, there is no requirement for trans fats in the diet, either, and it is suggested that our intake of trans fats be as low as possible. Butter or Margarine? Butter is a more natural product than margarine, composed of onlyone or two ingredients (cream and sometimes salt). Trans fat freemargarines may have little or no hydrogenated oils, but they docontain many natur Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Despite the fact that health professionals for years have recommended reducing its intake, butter intake is still quite high, at 23 sticks per American per year. Its creamy delicious goodness just has not gone away. But is butter making a comeback in the nutrition science world? Is it really not as bad as we once thought? Although it was vilified in the 1980’s and 1990’s, has it been pardoned from its unhealthy label? History Butter has always been a staple in the American diet. In the 1920’s, Americans consumed approximately 72 sticks (18 pounds) of butter per year. The Great Depression hit and then World War II, with these events causing a steep decline in butter consumption with a concurrent rise in margarine use. Butter continued to decrease in the American diet throughout the 1950’s – 1980’s. At that point, the role of butter stayed fairly steady at around 20 sticks (5 pounds) per year. Rising intake just recently started in the 2010’s decade. Nutritional Content Butter is 100% fat, meaning all of the calories that butter provides are in the form of fat. One tablespoon of butter contains 102 calories, all from the 11 grams of total fat. Looking at the fat content more closely, that tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat and 3 grams of monounsaturated fat, as well as approximately 31 mg of cholesterol. Is Butter Recommended for Diabetics? For years, saturated fats in butter and other foods were discouraged because of the strong association with cardiovascular diseases. Eating a diet high in saturated fat raises blood lipids, increasing the likelihood that arteries will be occluded by the lipids and eventually lead to serious complications such as heart attack and stroke. This is a known scientifically proven fact. The American Heart Ass Continue reading >>

Peanut Butter And Diabetes

Peanut Butter And Diabetes

D.D. Family T2 dx'd 04/08 - diet & exercise exercise exercise Basically it's a yeast paste that is spread on bread or toast. Even the company's own ads play on the 'you either love it or hate it' theme. You have to get up pretty early if you want to get out of bed - Groucho Marx D.D. Family T2 dx Dec '06 Metformin SR 2000mg, Victoza 1.2mg OK I'm gonna be a rebel and say the unthinkable, My name is Jody and I don't like peanut butter...!! sorry, never have and not sure it will ever win me over! I'm rebelling with Jody on this. Love peanuts. Love Butter (though I don't eat it any more). Peanut Butter??? I just don't get it. A1c December 06 6.3 March 06 6.2 June 07 5.7 Dec 07 5.8 June 08 5.6 Nov. 08 5.7 Jan 09 5.8 May 09 5.6 Aug 09 5.4 Feb 10 6.0 Sept 10 6.5 Feb 11 7.1 June 11 5.7 Nov 11 5.9 (41) Feb 12 6.1 (43) Aug 12 6.4 (46) Dec 12 5.8 (40.4) June 13 5.9 (41) January 14 6.1 (43) July 14 6.4 (46) Feb. 15 5.8 (40) Sept 15 6.8 (52) January 16 7.6% (60) April 16 7.0% (53) July 16 5.9% (41) Oct. 16 5.4% (36) The type of fat in PB is the "good kind", and helps with slowing down carb absorption when eaten on toast or bagels (bread, whatever). I've been encouraged to use it, but also measure it (I got a 1 tbsp ice cream scoop, so it boots the stuff out of there and doesn't stick ) and not go crazy with it, since it is primarily fat calories...but it's also healthy. I get the type that has no hydrogenated oils (but is not a brick with an oil slick on top that has to be stirred up to be usable), and is sweetened with something besides sugar- and has VERY little carb count in the serving size (like 2 gms/serving). I also get a brand that has Omega-3's in it, so that also doesn't hurt.... The sugar free Reese's PB cups are pretty good !!! Just watch out for that "intestinal speed" Continue reading >>

Is New Improved Margarine Good For You?

Is New Improved Margarine Good For You?

What do you think about Smart Balance margarine which claims it has no trans-fatty acids? Is it healthier? The manufacturer of Smart Balance margarine claims its product contains no hydrogenated oil and no trans-fatty acids and therefore should lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise HDL (good) cholesterol just the opposite effect of spreads that contain both of these forms of fat. This is supposed to happen if you limit your intake of dietary fat to 30 percent of daily calories and keep your consumption of dietary cholesterol to under 300 mg per day. In other words, if the fat in your diet is the same blend of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats as in Smart Balance. The patented blend of oils in Smart Balance may, indeed, live up to the manufacturers claims if the dietary fats in your diet really do mirror the mix of fats the margarine provides, but managing this on a daily basis isnt as simple as it may seem. If you have cholesterol problems, I recommend limiting your consumption of trans-fatty acids and increasing your consumption of omega-3 fatty acids, especially from fish. Minimize your consumption of refined carbohydrates, eat more oat bran and other foods containing soluble fiber as well as plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, soy foods and other legumes. Drink green tea regularly and eat garlic, hot red pepper (chile) and shiitake mushrooms frequently. While Smart Balance may be better than most margarine if you adhere to the specified balance of fats in the rest of your diet my views about margarine remain unchanged. It is still fat, mostly unhealthy fat, and a highly processed food. The less processed food you eat, the better. If your bread requires a spread, consider switching to some delicious, fresh bread that needs no help from added fat. Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Margarine Or Butter Recommendations

Margarine Or Butter Recommendations

I want to recommend a butter or margarine to my aunt, and get some myself that I can use on bread or brown rice. Can someone recommend some butter/margarine that won't clog your arteries and is diabete worthy? I was reading the label of "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter". Weird name, but it looked healthy. What do you guys think of that? D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Promise says there a good heart margarine I use butter myself as I feel its better I dont over do it to much. D.D. Family T2 - late Jan, 2009 Avandamet 500 mg twice daily I don't use fake. I never was a margarine user. Even when I was a little girl my family used butter. I have on occassion used whipped butter and the Land O Lakes Spreadable Butter with Olive Oil but I don't use I can't believe or buttery like spray or anything like that. I figure that since butter is natural and comes from a cow it is better for me to have some butter that probaby is processed better by my body then a spread of who knows what that might be harder to process by my body and comes from some lab I use real butter too for all my baking. The only margerine that doesn't clog your arteries is the liquid spray kind. I find, though it takes a lot of sprays to get enough flavor on something. I rarely use it anymore, since I don't eat bread or rice. I buy the Smart Balance brand. They have a liquid spray with 0 fat and several solid spreads. I buy the Smart Balance light. It is 5 grams of fat. Most margerine and butter are 14 grams of fat. They also have an olive oil blend, but it is higher fat. Olive oil is 14 gram of fat a serving ( 1 tablespoon). I have both Butter and Smart Balance . . . of course believing in the power of Low Carbohydrate eatting, I haven't had bread or rice in a decade . . . . Diagnosed type two at Continue reading >>

Smart Balance Nutrition Information

Smart Balance Nutrition Information

James Patterson specializes in health and wellness topics, having written and produced material for the National Institutes of Health, the President's Cancer Panel and an Inc. 500 Hall of Fame company. He is also a former sportswriter with writing experience in basketball, baseball, softball, golf and other popular sports. A butter pad on a piece of bread.Photo Credit: lelja/iStock/Getty Images Smart Balance is a line of spreads, oils and other products such as sour cream and milk that are marketed toward people aiming for heart-healthy food solutions. Understanding the nutritional facts behind Smart Balance products can help you determine if they really are the best solution for your dietary needs and your heart health. Buttery Spread is Smart Balances flagship product and represents the companys efforts to provide consumers with healthy spreads such as margarine. One serving of Buttery Spread -- approximately 1 tbsp. -- contains 80 calories, all of which come from fat. The spread contains 9 g of fat, 2.5 g of which is saturated fat, 3.5 g of which is polyunsaturated fat and 3 g of which is monounsaturated fat. The spread contains no cholesterol and only 90 mg of sodium. Smart Balance makes many of its products -- especially spreads -- with the same core ingredients. For example, the Buttery Spread consists of a blend of soybean, palm fruit, canola and olive oil, along with water, whey, salt and natural and artificial flavorings. Also included in the ingredients are calcium disodium as a preservative, vitamins B6, B12 and vitamins E and D. Smart Balance prides itself on providing products that are naturally trans-fat free. Trans fats are made from hydrogenated oils -- oils that have hydrogen added to them in order to prevent spoilage -- and contribute to raising your Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

I was devastated recently when all my favorite flavored peanut butter products were temporarily unavailable with the PB food safety out-break . Living with diabetes most my life, I was not only encouraged to eat peanut butter for a night time snack, but for many years I thought of it as a freebie. I was destined to be a PB junkie. (Some habits are still hard to break ex: eating spoonfuls out of the PB jar!) I know DiabetesSisters' members are savvy women who are aware of the high fat content of peanut butter. Although I highly encourage awareness of portion control, I also want to make sure everyone is aware of various products and what you should be looking out for. Ever seen the grocery aisles lined with products that seem to scream out 0 grams trans fats!? The sad truth is that as per FDA regulations if the serving contains less than 0.5 gram [of trans fat], the content, when declared, shall be expressed as zero. So you can still see products with hydrogenated oils posing as healthy and trans-fat free ones. Most peanut butters have hydrogenated vegetable oils and partial hydrogenated oil. Continue reading >>

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?

The world of nutrition is often confusing, even for dietitians and other nutrition experts. Debates (and bickering) rage on about which diet is best for weight loss, how much carbohydrate a person with diabetes should have, and what kind of fat is best to eat. It’s not so easy these days to choose a spread for your morning toast or your baked potato. Years ago, folks had pretty much two choices: butter and margarine. Today, we have butter, light butter, whipped butter, stick margarine, vegetable oil spread, margarine with phytosterols, margarine with yogurt, and vegan margarine (just to name a few). How do you possibly choose? First things first Most people know that butter and margarine are not the same. There are distinct differences between the two, even though they’re often used for the same purpose. Butter • Made from churned cream (so it’s an animal product) • Contains cholesterol and saturated fat (1 tablespoon has roughly 30 milligrams of cholesterol and 7 grams of saturated fat) • Does not contain trans fats (an unhealthy type of fat formed when oils are partially hydrogenated) • Contains vitamins A, D, E, and K • Good choice for baking • Healthier options are whipped butter or butter blended with canola or olive oil • “European-style” or “rich” butter contains even more fat and saturated fat than regular butter Margarine • Made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil • Some brands contain trans fat (1 tablespoon of stick margarine contains 3 grams of trans fat) • Contains less saturated fat than butter (1 tablespoon has approximately 2–3 grams of saturated fat) and no cholesterol • Tub and liquid margarines are healthier than stick margarines • Some brands are fortified with plant stanols or sterols Continue reading >>

11 Healthy Brands That Are The Best Butter Substitutes

11 Healthy Brands That Are The Best Butter Substitutes

11 Healthy Brands That Are the Best Butter Substitutes Who would have thought that such a simple, ancient and enjoyable food like butter could cause so much consternation among nutritionists? For decades weve been told that butter was the bad guy, lurking on the countertop or skulking in the fridge waiting to pounce and fur up our arteries on contact. But in the last few years the horror of butter has begun to recede. Butter makes you fat? Not according to all of the low carb dieters whove lost weight eating butter, even going to extremes like adding it to their morning coffee to make sure that they get enough healthy fat in their diet. Butter increases the risk of heart disease? Not according to studies and reviews of the evidence it doesnt. Butter contributes to type 2 diabetes? Once again the evidence says no. All of this kind of leaves nutritionists with egg on their face. All of these years telling us that butter was bad and vegetable oil based spreads were good, when it turns out the common vegetable oil spreads were full of harmful trans fats and artificial additives. Thankfully spreads are much healthier today. Researchers are now even finding that there is a good type of saturated fat and a bad type. Do you remember when all cholesterol was bad (even though its your bodys repair kit), and then researchers discovered HDL and LDL cholesterol? Well, the same thing has happened with saturated fat. Saturated fat is composed of chains of carbon molecules. Different fats have different chain lengths. Common saturated fats like palmitic acid have 16 carbon molecules in thier chain, and stearic acid has 18. Early research indicates that its these chains with even numbers of carbon molecules that cause problems. Having higher amounts of 16 or 18 carbon fatty acids in th Continue reading >>

Are Smart Balance Products Really A Healthy Choice? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

Are Smart Balance Products Really A Healthy Choice? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

One of the reasons that I started writing about food was because there wasn't much information available. At the time the government didn't require that manufacturers list nutrition information on their packages, but with all this extra information it helps if you know how to use the Nutrition Facts box. If you're reading this, you're probably well aware that the average American eats far more salt than is good for them, with estimates of the average sodium intake ranging from 3,400 milligrams to over 10,000 milligrams per day. The vast majority of the salt in foods comes not from the individual diner adding it at the table, but rather it is added during cooking (or processing). What do you think of Dr. Esselstyn's "Heart Attack Proof" diet? It has long since been proven that the type of diet that Dr. Esselstyn advocates isnotsubstantially more beneficial for you than the Mediterranean Diet. The science is based partly on research that looks at vegetarian diets and partly on Dean Ornish's work. In fact, due to the extreme nature of the low fat regime, it may actually be more harmful. It's easy to get answers about health and nutrition! Just send your question by email to [email protected] and Dr. Harlan will respond to selected questions of general interest. Answers will be posted in the Ask Dr. Gourmet newsletter ( sign up now!) and archived in the Ask Dr. Gourmet section of the website. Please note that the Ask Dr. Gourmet feature is restricted to questions regarding food and nutrition. Due to the many questions we receive, not all questions may be answered. For more specific questions about your individual health, please contact your doctor. About Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Are Smart Balance products really a healthy choice? Continue reading >>

Best Healthy Butter Substitutes - Consumer Reports

Best Healthy Butter Substitutes - Consumer Reports

Butter alternatives let you cut saturated fat but not flavor Its no surprise that there are loads of better than butter products in supermarkets today. Butter, after all, has 100 calories, 11 grams of fat, and 7 grams of saturated fat per tablespoon (about half the saturated fat you should consume in a day if youre following a 2,000-calorie-per-day diet). Margarine has the same calorie and fat content as butter, but less saturated fat. But it can contain trans fat , which is also damaging to your heart . Soft spreads that are low in saturated and trans fats are a definite improvement, says Alice H. Lichtenstein, D.Sc., Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Massachusetts. Heres the lowdown on the different types of toast toppers. Land O Lakes Spreadable Butter with Canola Oil comes closest to real butter. These blends of butter and vegetable oil have about half the saturated fat of butter but a similar calorie and total fat count. Consumer Reports tasters gave Land O Lakes an excellent rating for flavor. I Cant Believe Its Not Butter Light has a hint of sour cream flavor. Spreads are typically lower in calories, fat, and saturated fat than butter or margarine. Some brands boast that theyre made with olive oil or canola oil, but that doesnt mean they have the same nutritional profile as the oils themselves. Most are a blend of the featured oil and other vegetable oils. And all spreadseven those made with olive oil (such as Olivio) or yogurt (Brummel & Brown)have trans or saturated fat. Our tasters liked Brummel & Brown 35% Vegetable Oil Spread (which contains partially hydrogenated soybean oil) and I Cant Believe Its Not Butter Light (which has palm and palm kernel oils). Both have 45 calories, 5 grams of fat, and 1.5 grams of saturate Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

The 3 Best Butter Substitutes - Healthier Options For Butter Lovers

The 3 Best Butter Substitutes - Healthier Options For Butter Lovers

The 3 Best Butter Substitutes - Healthier Options for Butter Lovers In addition to being darn tasty, butter comes naturally packaged with many nutrients that can help protect you from chronic disease. And, the whipped butter varieties taste just as yummy but are lower in calories, fat and cholesterol than regular butter. But this week, we turn the spotlight on butter substitutes. Sadly, looking for the best picks here was no easy feat. Most of the brands we investigated turned out to be merely "healthy food imposters." Sure, they all tout ZERO TRANS FATS, LESS SATURATED FATS and ZERO CHOLESTEROL - and promises of "tastes just like the real thing" - but upon closer inspection...well, read on for the eBrandAid truth about three popular choices. #1 - I Can't Believe It's Not Butter Spread Calories 80, Fat 6g (2g saturated fat, 0g trans), Cholest. 0g, and Sodium 90mg INGREDIENTS: Vegetable Oil Blend (Liquid Soybean Oil, Liquid Canola Oil, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil), Water, Sweet Cream Buttermilk (Adds a Dietarily Insignificant amount of cholesterol), Salt, Soy Lecithin, Vegetable Mono and Diglycerides, Potassium Sorbate (Used to Protect Quality), Citric Acid, Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A Palmitate, Beta Carotene (for Color). Calories 80, Fat 6g (2g saturated fat, 0g trans), Cholest. 0mg, and Sodium 125mg INGREDIENTS: Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Water, Whey, Salt, Vegetable Mono- and Diglycerides and Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (to Preserve Freshness), Artificial Flavor, Phosphoric Acid (Acidulant), Vitamin A Palmitate, Colored with Beta Carotene (Source of Vitamin A). Calories 45, Fat 5g (saturated fat 1g, 0 trans fat), Cholest. 0mg, Sodium 90mg INGREDIENTS: Vegetable Oil B Continue reading >>

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