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Is Sleepiness A Sign Of Diabetes

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

If you’re coping with diabetes and feel wiped out all the time — the kind of fatigue that isn’t helped by eating or getting a little extra sleep — your doctor might tell you that your blood sugar levels are to blame. But research suggests that the fatigue associated with diabetes could have other causes. In a study published in June 2012 in The Diabetes Educator, researchers Cynthia Fritschi, PhD, RN and Laurie Quinn, PhD, RN, found that stress, depression, body mass index (BMI), and lack of physical activity can all be significant contributors to fatigue in people with diabetes. In the study, 83 women ages 40 to 65 with type 2 diabetes completed questionnaires about their health, fatigue levels, diabetes symptoms, depression, emotional distress, physical activity, and how they were managing and coping with diabetes. Some of the women wore a continuous glucose monitor for three days to assess the changes in their glucose (blood sugar) levels. The researchers found no relationship between the women’s fatigue level and their blood sugar control. Fasting blood sugar, glucose fluctuations over the study period, and results from the A1C test, which measures average blood sugar level over the previous two to three months, did not predict how tired the women reported feeling. “It appears that other factors — such as being overweight, getting little physical activity, and having higher levels of distress — could be causing their fatigue,” Fritschi says. A statement published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in November 2016 in its journal Diabetes Care recommends that physical activity be prescribed to all people living with diabetes in order to manage glycemic control and overall health. In particular, the ADA urges people living with diabetes to in Continue reading >>

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness In Type 2 Diabetes.

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness In Type 2 Diabetes.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in type 2 diabetes. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Patients (N = 110) were evaluated regarding Epworth Sleepiness Scale (EDS), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (Berlin questionnaire), and comorbidity severity (Charlson Comorbidity Index). Patients were compared with individuals with arterial hypertension and without diabetes. RESULTS: Diabetic patients had more EDS, depressive symptoms, and higher comorbidity severity than hypertensive patients (p < 0.005). In diabetic patients, poor quality sleep (53.3%), and high risk of OSA (40.9%) and RLS (14.5%) were found; EDS (55.5%) was associated with depressive symptoms present in 44.5% individuals (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.15), and remained so after data were controlled for age, gender, body mass index, and glycated hemoglobin (OR = 2.27; 95% CI 1.03-5.03). CONCLUSIONS: Sleep abnormalities are frequent. EDS affects most of the patients and is independently associated with depressive symptoms. Adequate antidepressant therapy should be tested for the effects on EDS. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

How To Recognize The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

How To Recognize The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children

5 0 For Ellen, the first sign was the night wakings. Her 10-year-old son, who always slept soundly until then, was suddenly up and down during the night. Three to four times a night, she would hear him fumbling for the light switch in the bathroom, and then listen as the toilet would flush. Other times, she would hear him filling a glass of water from the sink and guzzling it down. The first two nights, she wrote it off to the normal anxieties of boyhood. Everyone has trouble sleeping now and then, right? And he’d probably been eating too much pizza or chips at the homes of friends. All that salt would make anyone thirsty. Normal stuff. When the night wakings went on a third night, however, Ellen, a single mother of two in the U.S., stopped making excuses and got busy Googling. Symptom searches all came up with one word: “diabetes.” No way, she thought. No one in our family has diabetes. She called her pediatrician, who told her to bring her son in. Two hours and one blood glucose test later, Ellen and her son were on the way to the ER. This family’s experience, while unique to them in the details, will be played out in different ways 70,000 times across the world this year, according to the International Diabetes Federation. More than 70,000 mothers, fathers or caregivers will think no way, but will ultimately accept that their child’s symptoms do, in fact, signal Type 1 diabetes. While excessive thirst and frequent urination are common symptoms, there are many others that signal Type 1 diabetes in children. Here are some of the others: Increased appetite. A child who is normally easily sated will be hungry constantly. Unexplained weight loss. Even though the child seems to be eating all the time, he or she is dropping pounds. Sugar in urine. Two hundred year Continue reading >>

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Signs Treatment Asymptomatic Hypo Be Prepared (how to carry a sugar supply) Exercise and hypo. Nigel Goes Hypo Hypo Humor References The most serious side effect of too much insulin is hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening, even fatal condition. Classic signs of hypoglycemia lethargy (lack of energy) weakness head tilting "drunkedness" - wobbling when walking, unbalanced hunger restlessness shivering ataxia - usually lack of muscular coordination, but maybe changes in head and neck movements disorientation stupor convulsions or seizures coma The occurrence of signs depends on how far the bg drops and on how fast the blood glucose drops. Owners of diabetic cats have also reported observing these signs sleepiness unable to wake the cat easily when it is sleeping. vomiting glassy eyes - it may look like it is staring into space laying, sleeping, or curled up in an unusual location of the house meowing, crying, yowling, or vocalizing in a way that is unusual for your cat some cats get aggressive drooling coughing Owners of diabetic dogs have also reported observing these signs sweating - check the nose and the paw pads. lip smacking or licking getting physically "stuck" in a place where the pet normally could get itself out (for example, behind a partially closed door that a pet would usually nudge open.) Some animals are asymptomatic at very low bg values. This means they do not show any of the usual signs of hypoglycemia even though their bg is very low. Read experiences of three pets who have had episodes of asymptomatic hypoglycemia. Be Prepared Always have corn syrup or sugar available. Corn syrup works well because it is a very pure sugar, and it is liquid. In the U.S. "Karo" is a brand name of corn syrup and you'll often see this Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Although the signs of diabetes can begin to show early, sometimes it takes a person a while to recognize the symptoms. This often makes it seem like signs and symptoms of diabetes appear suddenly. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to your body, rather than simply brushing them off. To that end, here are some type 1 and type 2 diabetes symptoms that you may want to watch out for: If you’re experiencing frequent urination your body might be telling you that your kidneys are trying to expel excess sugar in your blood. The resulting dehydration may then cause extreme thirst. Along the same lines, the lack of available fluids may also give you dry mouth and itchy skin. If you experience increased hunger or unexpected weight loss it could be because your body isn’t able to get adequate energy from the food you eat. High blood sugar levels can affect blood flow and cause nerve damage, which makes healing difficult. So having slow-healing cuts/sores is also a potential sign of diabetes. Yeast infections may occur in men and women who have diabetes as a result of yeast feeding on glucose. Other signs of diabetes Pay attention if you find yourself feeling drowsy or lethargic; pain or numbness in your extremities; vision changes; fruity or sweet-smelling breath which is one of the symptoms of high ketones; and experiencing nausea or vomiting—as these are additional signs that something is not right. If there’s any question, see your doctor immediately to ensure that your blood sugar levels are safe and rule out diabetes. So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of… Polyuria occurs when your body urinates more frequently—and often in larger amounts—than Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

5 Things You Didn't Realize Are Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

5 Things You Didn't Realize Are Signs Of Gestational Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock There are some unexpected and scary things that come up while you're pregnant. Some can be mild conditions, while others can be quite serious and require constant monitoring and treatment. Thankfully gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition that can be screened for in pregnant women early on in the pregnancy. It also can be effectively managed so as to cause no problems for mom or baby. Many moms-to-be who get diagnosed with gestational diabetes are shocked, but there may be some things you didn't realize are signs of gestational diabetes that could prepare you for the doctor's news. According to WebMD, gestational diabetes is not rare and occurs in as many as nine out of 10 pregnant women. The same site noted that anyone can get the condition, but people who are Hispanic, African-American, Native American, Asian American, and Pacific Islander carry a higher risk. Others with an elevated risk include women who were overweight before getting pregnant, have family members with diabetes, have had abnormal blood sugar tests before, have had a very large baby (nine pounds or more) or a stillbirth. According to What To Expect, gestational diabetes usually starts somewhere between weeks 24 and 28. The site explained that it happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to deal with an increased amount of glucose, or sugar, that's circulating in your blood that helps a baby grow. Many of the symptoms of gestational diabetes mimic normal pregnancy symptoms and often go unnoticed, but if you notice any of the following five signs you might have gestational diabetes. giphy According to the Mayo Clinic, polydipsia, or excessive thirst, is a classic marker of any diabetes condition. The site explained that if you have diabetes, extra suga Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, What You Need To Know

Diabetic coma symptoms are something we should all be aware of. It is true that type 1 diabetics are more likely to experience them than type 2, but as diabetics are living longer, the chance of experiencing symptoms is greater. One statistic is that up to 15% of diabetics will go into diabetic coma because of severe hypoglycemia. Coma is another word for unconscious. A diabetic is in a coma if he cannot be wakened and can't respond to sounds and sights. It does not mean the person in a coma will die. These days, with swift blood test results and treatment, a diabetic will come out of a coma very fast. Diabetic medical alert bracelets and necklaces keep us from being misdiagnosed as drunk or epileptic when we cannot speak. But just knowing you are a diabetic is not enough. If you are taken to an emergency room, the doctors look for diabetic alert charms. But diabetic coma symptoms still need to be diagnosed correctly so the proper treatment is started, because there are three different types of coma, and the complications of all three are brain damage and death. Oddly, either chronic high blood sugar or sudden low blood sugar can trigger diabetic coma symptoms. That's why it's good to know how we react to both of them. With high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, you feel thirsty and have to urinate more often. You feel fatigue, and there is always nausea and vomiting, often for days. You can feel short of breath and have stomach pain. There is a fruity or acetone smell to your breath and a fast heartbeat. The symptoms are not sudden. But low blood sugar comes on very swiftly and can wake you out of a sound sleep. You feel shaky, nervous, tired and either hungry or nauseated. You sweat a lot and your heart races. You can get irritated and even aggressive for no reason, and Continue reading >>

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

If you are wondering whether you could have prediabetes, it may seem logical to ask: “What are its symptoms?” Unfortunately, unlike many chronic conditions, the single most common symptom of prediabetes is actually no symptom at all, which is why nearly 90% of people are not aware they have it. So being on the lookout for obvious signs is actually a very unreliable way to find out if you are at risk. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. But unless lifestyle changes are made, many people who are newly diagnosed with prediabetes will worsen and convert to full-blown type 2 diabetes within a few years. That’s why prediabetes should really be thought of as simply an earlier stage of type 2 diabetes. But while prediabetes might come without obvious, external symptoms, that does not make it harmless. In fact, evidence suggests that some people with prediabetes are already experiencing internal damage – the tiny vessels that supply blood to your eyes, kidneys, and nerve may already be starting to be harmed. In other words, it must be taken seriously. So what is the best way to find out if you are at risk? It takes less than a minute to take the CDC’s prediabetes screening test. If it turns out that you are at high risk, take comfort in knowing that while prediabetes might be hard to spot from the outside, it doesn’t mean it’s hard to treat. In fact, Prevent has helped the majority of our participants reduce their excess weight and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. That said, if you already know you have prediabetes, you should also be on the lookout for signs of type 2 diabetes. A 2011 study surveyed people in early stages of diabetes to find out w Continue reading >>

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

The main symptoms of diabetes are increased urination (polyuria), thirst ( polydipsia) and tiredness. Common symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: Excessive thirst Increased urination (sometimes as often as every hour) Unexpected weight loss Nausea, perhaps vomiting Blurred vision In women, frequent vaginal infections Yeast infections (thrush) Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching skin, especially in the groin or vaginal area. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop quickly, over weeks or sometimes days. Type 2 diabetes often doesn’t cause symptoms and is identified on routine screening. Acanthosis nigricans as a warning sign This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin, especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes light brown or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like a small wart, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually affects people who are very overweight. There is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but losing weight may improve the condition. Acanthosis nigricans usually precedes diabetes. There are other conditions that are also known to cause acanthosis nigricans, including acromegaly and Cushing syndrome. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin manifestation of insulin resistance in most people. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a condition characterised by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that is first recognised during pregnancy. The condition occurs in approximately 14% of all pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed during routine screening before it causes any symptoms. Seek Continue reading >>

Daytime Sleepiness Increases The Risk For Severe Hypoglycemia

Daytime Sleepiness Increases The Risk For Severe Hypoglycemia

Patients with diabetes who are excessively sleepy during the day may be at a higher risk for hypoglycemia…. Sleep-disordered breathing and the daytime tiredness that comes with it are common in type 2 diabetes. In a subgroup analysis from a large observational study, researchers found that patients who had higher scores on two different scales of daytime sleepiness were significantly more likely to have suffered from severe hypoglycemia (P=0.016 and P=0.024, respectively). The 898 participants in the study, who had a mean age of 67.9 years, completed two questionnaires on sleep-disordered breathing and daytime sleepiness, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Berlin Questionnaire. They were also asked about episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Inkster et al found that subjects who scored highly on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale were significantly more likely to have suffered from severe hypoglycemia than those with low scores (15.6% versus 9%, P=0.016). A positive score in the "sleepiness" category of the Berlin Questionnaire was also associated with a history of previous severe hypoglycemia compared with a negative score (13% versus 8%, P=0.024), they reported. The overall Berlin score, however, wasn’t related to severe hypoglycemia, and in regression analyses controlling for several factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, body mass index, and treatment type, the Berlin sleepiness category was no longer significant. Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, on the other hand, maintained its significance in those analyses. The researchers stated that the study was limited by its cross-sectional design, and the findings need to be replicated by collecting prospective data on hypoglycemia and other important confounding factors. Practice Pearls: Subjects who scored hi Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile)? Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition that usually starts in childhood, but can occur in adults (30 to 40-year-olds). In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces very little insulin. Insulin helps cells in the body convert sugar into energy. When the pancreas cannot make enough insulin, sugar starts to build up in the blood, causing life-threatening complications. Individuals with type 1 diabetes must take some form of insulin for the rest of their lives. Unusual Thirst Symptoms Unusual thirst is a very common symptom of type 1 diabetes. This condition causes the kidneys to remove excess sugar in the blood by getting rid of more water. The water is removed through urinating, causing dehydration and dehydration causes you to drink more water. Weight Loss Symptoms Patient with type 1 diabetes develop unintentional weight loss and an increase in appetite because blood sugar levels remain high and the body metabolizes fat for energy. Disrupted glucose metabolism also causes patient to feel a lack of energy and drowsy for extended periods Excess urination also cause weight loss because many calories are leaving the body in urine. Skin Problems Symptoms The disruption in glucose metabolism in patient with type 1 diabetes causes skin changes. Type 1 diabetics are at a higher risk for bacterial infections and fungal infections. Poor blood circulation in the skin may also occur. Patient with type 1 diabetes are often infected with fungal infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans. Common fungal infections include athlete's foot, vaginal yeast infection in women, jock itch, ringworm, and diaper rashes in babies. Diaper rash caused by the yeast Candida albicans can spread to other areas of the body such as the stomach and legs. Other Dangero Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia, postprandial hypoglycemia, or sugar crash is a term describing recurrent episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia occurring within 4 hours[1] after a high carbohydrate meal in people who do not have diabetes.[2] The condition is related to homeostatic systems utilised by the body to control blood sugar levels. It is variously described as a sense of tiredness, lethargy, irritation, or hangover, although the effects can be less if one has undertaken a lot of physical activity within the next few hours after consumption. The alleged mechanism for the feeling of a crash is correlated with an abnormally rapid rise in blood glucose after eating. This normally leads to insulin secretion (known as an insulin spike), which in turn initiates rapid glucose uptake by tissues either accumulating it as glycogen or utilizing it for energy production. The consequent fall in blood glucose is indicated as the reason for the "sugar crash".[3]. A deeper cause might be hysteresis effect of insulin action, i.e., the effect of insulin is still prominent even if both plasma glucose and insulin levels were already low, causing a plasma glucose level eventually much lower than the baseline level[4]. Sugar crashes are not to be confused with the after-effects of consuming large amounts of protein, which produces fatigue akin to a sugar crash, but are instead the result of the body prioritising the digestion of ingested food.[5] The prevalence of this condition is difficult to ascertain because a number of stricter or looser definitions have been used. It is recommended that the term reactive hypoglycemia be reserved for the pattern of postprandial hypoglycemia which meets the Whipple criteria (symptoms correspond to measurably low glucose and are relieved by raising the glucos Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

The two main symptoms of diabetes insipidus are often needing to pass large amounts of urine and feeling extremely thirsty. If you have diabetes insipidus, you may pass pale, watery urine every 15-20 minutes. The amount of urine passed can range from 3 litres (5.2 pints) in mild cases to up to 20 litres (35 pints) in severe cases. It's also likely that you'll feel thirsty all the time and have a 'dry' feeling that's always present, no matter how much water you drink. If you need to pass urine regularly and always feel thirsty, your sleeping patterns and daily activities may be disrupted. This can cause tiredness, irritability and difficulty concentrating, which can affect your daily life further. You may also feel generally unwell and 'run down' much of the time for no apparent reason. Symptoms in children Excessive thirst can be difficult to recognise in children who are too young to speak. Signs and symptoms that could suggest diabetes insipidus include: excessive crying irritability slower than expected growth hyperthermia (high body temperature) In older children, symptoms of diabetes insipidus include: wetting the bed (enuresis) – although most children who wet the bed don't have diabetes insipidus loss of appetite feeling tired all the time (fatigue) Next review due: 01/04/2019 Continue reading >>

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