diabetestalk.net

Is Shingles Worse For Diabetics

Is The Herpes Virus Related To Type 1 Diabetes?

Is The Herpes Virus Related To Type 1 Diabetes?

Is the Herpes Virus related to Type 1 Diabetes? Hi all! Im new to the forum as a writer, but have been lurking for quite some time! I see that so many are on here and get more answers than with other forums, or even just doing their own research. I was diagnosed Type 1 when I was 22. Ive been diabetic for 5 years now. I always wondered what brought on my diagnosis, and always chalked it up to being extremely stressed right before: I was planning my wedding by myself, and finishing up my Associates Degree, then my mother had a stroke, and some close friends left my life. Id say I was an emotional mess back then. Anyway, as a child I was always super thin. I was 3 months premature, had two holes in my heart (that luckily healed on their own), but otherwise was fairly healthy. One thing that has crossed my mind though is the herpes virus. When I was younger, I had chicken pox twice and shingles once. As an adult I got mono, and then an outbreak of fever blisters in my mouth a couple of times which I had to get medication for. I know that all are various forms of the Herpes virus. I have tried researching to see if Type 1 Diabetes is linked at all, but I cant remember finding anything definitive. Does anyone know if it is linked to T1D? Maybe I was always at risk for developing diabetes, or maybe it has nothing to do with it. I was just wondering if anyone has heard any correlation between the two? I understand that all infectons (mono, shingles, etc) are different types of the Herpes virus. I am hoping I dont have any other form of the virus rear its ugly head in my lifetime! Type 1 is certainly auto immune, although Ive never heard a link to any specific virus or bacteria. I was diagnosed just before high school. The cold/flu season right before, I had three long bouts w Continue reading >>

Shingles (herpes Zoster) | Symptoms, Causes And Treatments | Patient

Shingles (herpes Zoster) | Symptoms, Causes And Treatments | Patient

Dr Sarah Jarvis, GP and Clinical Director of patient.info Shingles is a painful, blistery rash in one specific area of your body. Most of us get chickenpox in our lives, usually when we are children. Shingles is a reactivation of that chickenpox virus but only in one nerve root. So instead of getting spots all over the place, the way you do when you have chickenpox, you get them just in one area of your body. Usually (other than on your head) it will just be on one side of your body, although it may go right round from front to back, following the skin the nerve affects. The affected skin hurts, and it may start to hurt before the rash appears, and may keep hurting for some time after the rash has gone. You may feel generally off-colour and not yourself. The virus usually affects one nerve only, on one side of the body. Symptoms occur in the area of skin that the nerve supplies. The usual symptoms are pain and a rash. Occasionally, two or three nerves next to each other are affected. The most commonly involved nerves are those supplying the skin on the chest or tummy (abdomen). The upper face (including an eye) is also a common site. The pain is a localised band of pain. It can be anywhere on your body, depending on which nerve is affected. The pain can range from mild to severe. You may have a constant dull, burning, or gnawing pain. In addition, or instead, you may have sharp and stabbing pains that come and go. The affected area of skin is usually tender. The rash typically appears 2-3 days after the pain begins. Red blotches appear that quickly develop into itchy blisters. The rash looks like chickenpox but only appears on the band of skin supplied by the affected nerve. New blisters may appear for up to a week. The soft tissues under and around the rash may become Continue reading >>

Relief For Neuropathic Pain Due To Shingles Or Diabetes

Relief For Neuropathic Pain Due To Shingles Or Diabetes

We welcome your questions. Neuropathic pain is a common condition. Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to peripheral nerves from traumatic injuries, infections, metabolic problems, inherited causes or exposure to toxins. One of the most common causes is diabetes mellitus. It often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in the hands and feet but it can also affect other areas of your body. People with peripheral neuropathy generally describe the pain as stabbing, burning or tingling. Another problem that can progress to chronic neuropathic pain is postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a complication of shingles. Shingles (medically known as herpes zoster) result from the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus that is most commonly contracted during childhood in the form of chickenpox. Virus that had remained dormant for decades can re-manifest as a painful, blistering, and vesicular rash. While the characteristic rash of herpes zoster usually clears within 2 to 4 weeks, 20% of people may experience pain in the form of PHN that persists after the rash has healed. The pain is a consequence of peripheral nerve damage caused by the herpes zoster attack, and can persist for years. Risk factors for PHN include advanced age, female gender, chronic disease, immunocompromised condition, and a greater severity of outbreak and pain during the acute phase. The management of chronic neuropathic pain is challenging and as many as half of patients fail to respond to any conventional (commercially available) treatment. Other patients may experience limited benefits even when taking multiple medications. Health care providers have increasing interest in the optimization and personalization of therapy based upon the underlying cause of neuropathic pain and the patient’s symptom Continue reading >>

What Is Shingles And Should A Person With Diabetes Get The Shingles Vaccination?

What Is Shingles And Should A Person With Diabetes Get The Shingles Vaccination?

What is shingles and should a person with diabetes get the shingles vaccination? Shingles is caused by the reactivation of the virus varicella zoster. This is a herpes virus that causes chicken pox with the first activation. After a person has chicken pox the virus hides in a person’s nerve roots. If reactivated, the virus presents as painful lesions called shingles (herpes zoster). It is found that approximately 20% of patients who develop shingles will have postherpetic neuralgia. This is a condition where there is severe pain along a nerve fiber due to damage to the nerve that can last months or even years. Eye involvement is found in 10-25% of people with shingles. You have approximately a 30% chance of having shingles in your lifetime and if you have had it, you can get it again. If you have shingles and come in contact with someone who never was vaccinated against chickenpox or had the active disease, they may develop chickenpox. According to PubMed you are more likely to develop shingles if: You had chickenpox before age 1 Your immune system is weakened by medications or disease . In 2011 the FDA approved the shingles vaccination for people age 50 and older. Clinical trials by the manufacturer of the vaccine found the vaccination to be approximately 70% effective in those 50-60 years of age and if they got shingles, it was less painful and was of shorter duration. The results of the shingles prevention study (median age of participants 69 years of age) showed vaccination reduced the incidence of shingles by 61% and postherpetic neuralgia by 66%. According to the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, chronic renal failure, coronary artery disease, chronic lung disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, are not considered contrai Continue reading >>

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

What are the differences between the causes of type 1 and type 2? The underlying causes of type 1 and type 2 are different. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is believed to be due to an autoimmune process, in which the body's immune system mistakenly targets its own tissues (islet cells in the pancreas). In people with type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas that are responsible for insulin production are attacked by the misdirected immune system. This tendency for the immune system to destroy the beta cells of the pancreas is likely to be, at least in part, genetically inherited, although the exact reasons that this process happens are not fully understood. Exposure to certain viral infections (mumps and Coxsackie viruses) or other environmental toxins have been suggested as possible reasons why the abnormal antibody responses develop that cause damage to the pancreas cells. The primary problem in type 2 diabetes is the inability of the body's cells to use insulin properly and efficiently, leading to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and diabetes. This problem affects mostly the cells of muscle and fat tissues, and results in a condition known as insulin resistance. In type 2 diabetes, there also is a steady decline of beta cells that worsens the process of elevated blood sugars. At the beginning, if someone is resistant to insulin, the body can at least partially increase production of insulin enough to overcome the level of resistance. Over time, if production decreases and enough insulin cannot be released, blood sugar levels rise. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin, but the body is not able to use it effectively. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the ce Continue reading >>

Shingles And Diabetes ?

Shingles And Diabetes ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just battled off an eye inflammation , then toothache now it is this ! My BG levels have been higher than normal . Plus am 'off' my food been more thirsty than actually hungry . Plenty of water with either vimto/blackcurrant (all sugar free) Or I crumble a orange berrocca tablet in water bottle to mix and get Up to now been shaky via the nervous system and have rash all Docs say its a worse case they have seen for a while . Physical stress factor has been mentioned by my doctors nurse yesterday . So far its unpleasant and is extremely PAINFUL . How long am I expected to have this for ? Never having this before - I am unsure of 'what' to expect ... I hope the doc has given you anti-virals. They help a lot. I think you are probably experiencing the worst of it right now. I only had a mild case which was caught early as I had a babe in arms at the time and was at the doctors anyway. The anti-virals stopped it spreading and stopped the shooting pains too. In the old days before antivirals I remember relatives suffering from it for months and months and being in agony. I hope yours goes as quickly as mine (3 weeks). You do need to rest and not get stressed. Get someone to wait on you Just battled off an eye inflammation , then toothache now it is this ! My BG levels have been higher than normal . Plus am 'off' my food been more thirsty than actually hungry . Plenty of water with either vimto/blackcurrant (all sugar free) Or I crumble a orange berrocca tablet in water bottle to mix and get Up to now been shaky via the nervous system and have rash all Docs say its a worse case they have seen for a while . Physical stress factor has been mentioned by my docto Continue reading >>

Is There Link Between Shingles & Diabetes

Is There Link Between Shingles & Diabetes

Is there link between Shingles & Diabetes Shingles is a nerve infection caused by the virus called Varicella-zoster and it is the same virus that causes chickenpox. When a person has chickenpox and it gets healed the virus does not go out of the body completely, instead it stays in a dormant and hibernating manner in the nerve roots. In one out of five persons this virus may become active once again many years later to cause shingles. It is a nasty, painful and itchy disease with blisters and it mostly affects the older adults above 50 years. Shingles can affect a person of any age, but the trend and studies have shown that persons with lowered body immunity have greater chances of having it. Body immunity may be low due to many reasons like old age, AIDS, cancer treatment, organ transplant, steroid treatment or extreme stress. Apart from these reasons it has been noticed that diabetes is just one disease which causes shingles to become active in the nerve cells and trigger the hibernating virus. Many cases have been seen in which the persons did not know they had diabetes and had shingles. When they were tested it was found that they had diabetes. There is no direct link between the factors of having diabetes and getting shingles, but having diabetes is a trigger for the hibernating shingles virus. Diabetes is an auto-immune disease and people with auto-immune disease are prone to get shingles. AIDS, Rheumatoid arthritis, Kidney disease which require dialysis are also some diseases which trigger the dormant herpes-zoster virus. No one can catch shingles. If a person comes in contact with the blisters of an active shingles patient he will get chickenpox if he did not get it before. Shingles can outbreak from within the body only as the virus is there in the nerve roots Continue reading >>

My 10 Year Old Was Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes In September. Today We Found Out He Has Shingles. =( : Parenting

My 10 Year Old Was Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes In September. Today We Found Out He Has Shingles. =( : Parenting

We also recommend /r/relationships , /r/legaladvice and /r/family . Its fine to disagree with people but please remain respectful. Dont insult people or their children, call people names or bring rudeness into it. Absolutely no bullying or personal attacks including going through someones post history to find past comments to use against them. Basics include upvoting comments that add to discussions and downvoting off topic comments. Please dont downvote people just because you disagree, diverse opinions are what makes our subreddit great. If someone is breaking one of our rules report the comment, so our moderators can remove it. Remember you are speaking to another person. If you are having issues with another user, message the moderators to help you deal with it and do not fight in the comments. Moderaters have discretion to remove comments as needed. Typically this action will come when one or more comment threads have moved off topic and/or have become contentious, rather than respectful sharing of information and opinions. If you are having issues with the sub and want to make a meta post, please message us first. Please dont pull issues with other subs into our community. No good comes of cross-sub wars and we dont need those kinds of issues in our sub. Crossposting anything from /r/parenting to any other subreddit might result in a ban and may result in the original thread being locked. Reddit is not the best place to get legal or medical advice. Your post may be removed or redirected. Requests for specific medical advice or diagnosis are not permitted in the subreddit because even medical professionals will not diagnose without examining the actual symptoms of a person actually present in front of them. Please refer all such questions to your pediatrician. If Continue reading >>

A Link Between Shingles And Diabetes

A Link Between Shingles And Diabetes

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and the risk of herpes zoster (HZ). The study concluded that patients with T1DM are at a higher risk of HZ than people without T1DM. Patients with diabetes have an impaired regulation of their immune system. In general, patients with diabetes are more prone to infections than those without diabetes. Herpes zoster is the virus that can causes chickenpox and shingles. The symptoms of chickenpox are a mild fever and a rash of itchy inflamed pimples that turn to blisters and then scabs. This mainly affects children. The virus that causes chickenpox and shingles is not the same virus responsible for cold sores or genital herpes, a sexually transmitted infection. It is unclear whether there is an association between the herpes zoster virus and diabetes. This study included 4,736 patients with T1DM receiving insulin therapy. The study also included 18,944 participants without diabetes. They measured the risk of HZ in the T1DM group compared to the non-T1DM group. Patients with T1DM were more than twice as likely to have the herpes zoster virus than those without T1DM. Those with serious T1DM (those with more complications due to the disease) were 5 times more likely to have the herpes zoster virus. The current study concluded that patients with T1DM are at a higher risk of HZ than people without T1DM. This study was carried out in an Asian population and therefore the risk of HZ in other populations may differ. Continue reading >>

My Mil Has Shingles | Children With Diabetes Forums

My Mil Has Shingles | Children With Diabetes Forums

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. I realize she can transmit the chicken pox virus to those who have not either had the virus or received the vaccine. All of my children have had one round of the chicken pox vaccine at some point. Is there any reason I should be "extra" cautious and have Nick get the second chicken pox vaccine BECAUSE of his T1????? His ped says there are two rounds of the vaccine, but the second is not "manadatory". I don't know if getting the vaccine at THIS point would do any good. My nephew got shingles from his other grandfather when he was 4 and had had the chicken pox shot. I think you'd be better off just steering clear until she's not contagious anymore my two older children had the second vaccine and I'm perfectly happy to get my other two the booster when they become the age that my ped recommends they get it. For now, I agree w/ pp...steer clear until she's no longer contagious.. I wouldn't want to expose my "D" child to "try" and get the lifelong immunity because that means getting shingles and I cannot imagine how horrible that would be on their systems - especially since it is often treated with steroids which wreak havoc on blood sugars My younger son (ds#2) got exposed to chicken pox when his older brother brought them home from daycare. They both had very "good" cases...not mild. A year and a half later ds #2 got shingles. Not advocating the vaccine by any means but having chicken pox does not ensure life long immunity. Exposure means life long immunity. I guess I would rather deal with it with a CHILD than an adult with Type 1... Plus I have NOT heard of anyone I know being treated with anything other than a topical cream steroid with didn't affect Hailey's bgs Continue reading >>

Combo Treatment Relieves Shingles, Diabetes Nerve Pain

Combo Treatment Relieves Shingles, Diabetes Nerve Pain

Taking Neurontin and morphine together relieves nerve pain from shingles and diabetes better than either drug alone, researchers report. Neurontin and morphine are both used alone to treat nerve pain. But researchers wanted to see if using the two drugs together would offer even greater benefit without causing too many side effects. Soothing Nerve Pain The study looked at people with two common forms of nerve pain: 35 men and women with painful nerve damage due to diabetes, and 22 with painful nerve damage from shingles. Nerve pain from diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy, is common. Over time, high blood sugar levels from diabetes can damage nerves throughout the body, most commonly in the feet. In shingles, after the rash resolves, people can be left with nerve damage that can cause pain for weeks to years. This is called postherpetic neuralgia. Least Pain With Neurontin/Morphine Combo Researchers Ian Gilron, MD, of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, and colleagues gave study participants four different treatments for five weeks at a time. Patients received Neurontin, morphine, the two drugs in combination, or what researchers call an "active placebo." That’s a drug – in this case, the anti-anxiety drug Ativan – that has some effect and which keeps patients from guessing they are getting a placebo. Ativan causes some sedation but does not relieve pain. Patients rated their pain on a 1 to 10 scale where 1 is no pain and 10 is the worst pain imaginable. They started out with an average pain score of 5.72. They rated their pain at 3.06 after getting the combination treatment – significantly better than their 3.7 rating for morphine alone, their 4.15 rating for Neurontin alone, and their 4.49 rating for the placebo. Good News for Side Effects There was more Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Shingles

Diabetes And Shingles

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My father is a well controlled type 2. He has recently been diagnosed with shingles. I was wondering if there were any views out there about if diabetics get it worse - with all the issues of neuropathy etc. As a new member I am happy to get any views. I have searched out a few sites, in so doing I stumbled across one offering a pretty unique valentines card for diabetics - a bit off the wall but it may chear him up. Anyway opinions on the shingles would be great. My father is a well controlled type 2. He has recently been diagnosed with shingles. I was wondering if there were any views out there about if diabetics get it worse - with all the issues of neuropathy etc. As a new member I am happy to get any views. I have searched out a few sites, in so doing I stumbled across one offering a pretty unique valentines card for diabetics - a bit off the wall but it may chear him up. Anyway opinions on the shingles would be great. Hi and Welcome. I'm sorry to hear that your Dad has them. I wouldn't say that Diabetics get them worse, No. I've seen non-diabetics with severe cases also. As you know they are caused by the same virus as chicken pox. I actually had them twice. Once when I was 16 yrs.(mild) and Nov. /05(severe). I Before I was diagnosed, I was experiencing bouts of shingles every six months or so. (Technically, it might not have been "shingles," though I guess we'll never know because the doctor I was seeing at the time never bothered to do a biopsy or, ahem, a glucose reading.) After I was diagnosed with diabetes (by a different doctor, not that it was hard to figure out when I presented) Continue reading >>

Shingles Vaccine And Blood Sugar Control: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Shingles Vaccine And Blood Sugar Control: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Q. I have had diabetes for more than 40 years, and I use long-acting and rapid-acting insulins to manage my blood glucose levels. I am considering getting a shingles vaccine, but I’m concerned about the effect it might have on my blood glucose control. I find that taking antihistamines or even having hay fever causes my blood glucose to jump. Do you have any information on the glycemic effects of this vaccine? A. There is no indication that the shingles vaccine, or any vaccine for that matter, has any effect on blood glucose control. The only common side effects from the shingles vaccine are headache and local reactions where you are injected, such as pain, itching, or swelling. If you’re considering this vaccine, you probably already know that shingles can be extremely painful, and developing shingles becomes more common with age. The shingles vaccine is recommended for everyone 60 and older. It is the best way to reduce your chance of getting shingles or, if you do get it, to reduce your chance of having the long-lasting pain (called postherpetic neuralgia) that continues after the shingles rash has disappeared and can debilitate someone for weeks, months, or even longer. You should also know that there are two other vaccines recommended specifically for adults with diabetes: pneumococcal and hepatitis B vaccines. The pneumococcal vaccine helps prevent a serious infection that can lead to meningitis, sepsis, or pneumonia. It’s recommended for everyone 19 and older who has diabetes. The hepatitis B vaccine prevents liver cirrhosis, liver failure, and liver cancer and is recommended for adults with diabetes who are 19 to 60 years old. And of course, an annual flu vaccine is important for all adults and children 6 months old and older. Lastly, check whether you hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

What Is Shingles And What Causes It?

What Is Shingles And What Causes It?

You can think of shingles as the one-two punch of infections. Anyone who ever gets it had a case of the chickenpox first, often many decades earlier. The reason these two conditions are paired up: They come from the same virus. Chickenpox causes itchy blisters that might start on your back, chest, and face and spread to the rest of your body. Shingles is a rash with shooting pain. It usually shows up on just one side of your body. If you start to feel tingly and itchy on one side of your torso and then notice a rash, call your doctor. She can examine you and figure out whether you have shingles. Double the Trouble The virus that gets the blame for both conditions is varicella zoster. When it gets into your body, the first problem it causes is chickenpox, also called varicella. You may think of it as a childhood disease, but adults can get it, too. After the chickenpox runs its itchy course, the virus retreats to nerve tissues near your spinal cord and brain, where it hides out. Doctors don’t know why, but sometimes the virus “wakes up” and travels along nerve fibers to your skin. That’s when it lands its second punch -- shingles, also called herpes zoster. Who Gets It? We know that a weakened immune system might wake the virus up. If you’ve had chickenpox, you’re more likely to get shingles if you: Have cancer, HIV, or another disease that lower your body’s defenses Are 50 or older Are under a lot of stress Have had a physical trauma Take long-term steroids or other medicines that can weaken your immune system But many people who get shingles do not fit in any of these categories. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes