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Is Selenium Good For Diabetics?

6 Essential Minerals For Diabetics

6 Essential Minerals For Diabetics

If you are diabetic, there are many treatment options available, and supplements to try. However, help for diabetes may be closer than you think. These 6 essential minerals can fight the symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Minerals are an essential part of the human body. Minerals are just as vital as vitamins in keeping your body healthy and happy. In fact, mineral deficiencies can lead to a host of health problems, including an increased chance of diabetes. If you have diabetes, ensuring your diet is rich in the following minerals will help you restore balance to your body and reduce the need for diabetes medications. Combined with other natural treatments for diabetes, you may find that you no longer suffer from diabetes side effects at all. Before taking any of these supplements, consult with a health professional to identify their potential risks and benefits in your particular case. Chromium Chromium is a well-documented mineral that can help prevent and help with controlling blood sugar levels in existing diabetes. Chromium is also essential for the population of insulin receptors, for binding insulin to cells, and for increasing the utilization of glucose. While high doses of the mineral can be toxic, small dosage amounts have been shown to help diabetics with type 2 diabetes. Some studies have indicated that chromium picolinate may be more effective than other forms of chromium in supplements, as it is easier for the body to absorb and use. What It Does According to studies, chromium can enhance the effects of insulin. Deficiencies in chromium impair blood glucose control. In several studies, it was shown that those with diabetes have abnormally low chromium levels. The trace mineral may be able to reduce insulin levels and improve the lipid profile in Continue reading >>

On Call: Selenium And Diabetes

On Call: Selenium And Diabetes

Q. I've been taking a selenium pill every day to try to reduce my risk of prostate cancer. But now I've read that selenium can cause diabetes. My blood sugar has always been normal, but I'm concerned. Should I continue taking selenium? A. Supplements have been taking a big hit lately, and with good reason. As randomized clinical trials have been completed, one supplement after another has been a flop. Vitamins have been the greatest disappointment. First, antioxidant supplements proved worthless (or worse). Next, B vitamins that lower blood homocysteine levels failed to protect the heart. And now, men have reason to rethink that old standby, a daily multivitamin. Selenium is one of the few supplements still in play; the others are vitamin D and fish oil. To continue reading this article, you must login . Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Find the best treatments and procedures for you Explore options for better nutrition and exercise I'd like to receive access to Harvard Health Online for only $4.99 a month. Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

Higher Selenium Levels Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk: Harvard Study

Higher Selenium Levels Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk: Harvard Study

Related tags: Type-2 diabetes , Nutrition , Obesity , Diabetes mellitus , Diabetes Increased levels of selenium in the body may be associated with a 25% reduction in the risk of type-2 diabetes, says a new study from Korea and Harvard. Data from 3,630 women and 3,535 men indicated that increasing levels of selenium in toenails were associated with lower risks of diabetes, with the relationship appearing to be linear, according to findings published in Diabetes Care. Further research is required to determine whether varying results in this study versus prior trials relate to differences in dose, source, statistical power, residual confounding factors, or underlying population risk, said the researchers. Selenium is an essential micronutrient, and is considered to be an antioxidant. High levels of selenium have been inversely associated with risk of developing several cancers, including bladder, prostate and thryroid. The mineral is included in between 50 and 100 different proteins in the body, with multifarious roles including building heart muscles and healthy sperm. However, cancer prevention remains one of the major benefits of selenium, and it is the only mineral that qualifies for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved qualified health claim for general cancer reduction incidence. A recent review paper by Joyce McCann and Bruce Ames from the Nutrition and Metabolism Center at Childrens Hospital Oakland Research Institute in Oakland (CHORI) indicated that moderate deficiency in selenium may have long-term detrimental effects (FASEB Journal, 2011, Vol. 25, pp. 1793-1814). Scientists from Yeungnam University in Korea and Harvard analyzed data from two separate US cohorts. None of the participants were diabetic at the start of the study. Over the course of the s Continue reading >>

4 Minerals That Support Healthy Blood Sugar

4 Minerals That Support Healthy Blood Sugar

There’s a long debate about macronutrients (protein, carbs, and fat) and blood sugar, but there’s a lot less information out there about micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). Here’s a look at four minerals that are important for blood sugar control, plus some ideas for getting them from delicious, nutrient-dense Paleo recipes. A quick review (if you already know what glucose and insulin are, just skip the list): Blood sugar: the amount of sugar (glucose) that’s in your blood. It’s fine and normal for blood sugar to go up after a meal, but then it needs to go back down again. Too much glucose hanging out in your bloodstream for a long time is very dangerous. Insulin: the hormone responsible for clearing sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream. Insulin resistance: when insulin says “please take this glucose out of the bloodstream and put it in a fat/muscle cell” but your body doesn’t “listen” to the insulin and blood sugar stays high. This is very bad news. Type 2 Diabetes: People with type 2 diabetes have chronic insulin resistance, so they have high blood sugar a lot of the time. (Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and a totally different animal – here, “diabetes” means type 2). There are reams and reams of studies on diabetes because it’s officially a “disease” so it gets a lot of attention. “Problems managing blood sugar” isn’t officially a “disease” until it gets to a particular cut-off, so it doesn’t get as much attention. But type 2 diabetes doesn’t come from nowhere. It starts with problems managing blood sugar that steadily get worse over time. Diabetes is the extreme end of the spectrum, not some new and totally unrelated issue. All of this is to say: there are a lot of studies in this post on diabetes and peopl Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Selenium Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

Selenium Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The chances of developing type 2 diabetes were as much as 24 percent lower among people with a diet rich in selenium than among those who consumed little of the mineral in a large new U.S. study. The findings, published in the journal Diabetes Care, are based on 7,000 male and female health care professionals followed for decades. But they add to a mixed bag of evidence on the protective effects of selenium, a known antioxidant, when it comes to diabetes. I wouldnt suggest, based on the findings from this study, that people start taking selenium supplements, said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, senior author of the new report, from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. For one, he said, there are multiple different types of selenium, which may have different effects and supplements contain only a single type. Antioxidants are thought to offer some protection against chronic diseases, including diabetes, and selenium has become a popular supplement in recent years for that reason. The mineral is also found naturally in foods like bread, meat and nuts. In some places, it occurs in high concentrations in soil, affecting the direct exposure of people who live nearby and the selenium content of foods grown in the region. To look at the long-term effect of selenium exposure on diabetes risk in otherwise healthy people, Mozaffarian and his colleagues analyzed toenail clippings from the 1980s. A little over 7,000 women and men participating in the long-term Nurses Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study had contributed the samples between 1982 and 1987 and answered extensive questionnaires about their diets, lifestyles and illnesses over the next two decades. None had diabetes or heart disease at the beginning of the study. And just Continue reading >>

Are Selenium Levels Linked To Diabetes?

Are Selenium Levels Linked To Diabetes?

A new study finds that diabetics had higher levels of selenium, a mineral found in U.S. soil but also some dietary supplements By Marla Cone , Environmental Health News on May 20, 2009 Americans with diabetes have high levels of selenium in their bodies, prompting some health experts to suspect that it could contribute to development of the disease. In response to their new findings, a research team has recommended that U.S. residents stop taking supplements that contain selenium. Most Americans ingest large amounts of the mineralsubstantially more than people elsewherebecause soil in much of the country contains high levels that are absorbed by crops. Selenium occurs naturally in soil and leaches onto farm fields from irrigation and streams. The research team, led by Johns Hopkins University epidemiologists, examined the diabetes rate and selenium levels of 917 people over the age of 40 who participated in a national health study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2003 and 2004. They found that most had a lot of selenium in their blood, but those with diabetes had substantially more. The benefits and dangers of selenium have been debated in recent years because some studies show it might help protect people from cancer and heart disease. Selenium is an essential element and antioxidant, but medical experts say there is a fine line between the amount that the body needs and the amount that is harmful. Given the current diabetes epidemic, the high selenium intake from naturally occurring selenium in U.S. soil and the popularity of multivitamin/mineral supplements containing selenium in the U.S., these findings call for a thorough evaluation of the risk and benefits associated with high selenium status in the U.S., the researchers wrote i Continue reading >>

Limit Selenium To Avoid Diabetes

Limit Selenium To Avoid Diabetes

March 9, 2017 by David Mendosa Some health recommendations on the internet suggest that you take supplemental selenium. But if you do, a recent study shows that you could be at an increased risk of developing diabetes. While a little selenium in our diet is essential, almost all Americans get much more than they need. The National Academy of Medicine sets the Recommended Dietary Allowance for selenium at 55 micrograms per day for both men and women. In the United States and Canada, the dietary intake of selenium is considerably higher than this, according to studies that the National Academy of Medicine cited. And the risk for selenium deficiency in the United States is negligible, concluded an editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine published in 2007. A randomized placebo-controlled trial involving participants from clinical centers in Arizona, Colorado, Texas, and New York, investigated whether taking a selenium supplement of 200 micrograms per day could help prevent colorectal cancer. The Journal of the National Cancer Institute published the results of the study in its December 2016 issue. Only the abstract is currently free online , but the full text was available when I started to research this post. The researchers studied the effects of taking a selenium supplement because they thought that it might reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Instead, however, they discovered that it failed to help reduce that risk. Worse, the selenium supplement increased the risk of type 2 diabetes. Among the people who were older than 62, the chances of getting diabetes more than doubled, which was statistically significant. These results came from a large, long clinical trial in six centers around the country. The randomized, controlled design of this type of study is known Continue reading >>

Selenium Supranutrition: Are The Potential Benefits Of Chemoprevention Outweighed By The Promotion Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance?

Selenium Supranutrition: Are The Potential Benefits Of Chemoprevention Outweighed By The Promotion Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance?

Selenium Supranutrition: Are the Potential Benefits of Chemoprevention Outweighed by the Promotion of Diabetes and Insulin Resistance? Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA; E-Mail: [email protected] * Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: [email protected] ; Tel.: +1-301-405-2940; Fax: +1-301-314-3313. Received 2013 Mar 5; Revised 2013 Apr 5; Accepted 2013 Apr 7. Copyright 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( ). This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Selenium was considered a toxin until 1957, when this mineral was shown to be essential in the prevention of necrotic liver damage in rats. The hypothesis of selenium chemoprevention is principally formulated by the observations that cancer incidence is inversely associated with selenium status. However, recent clinical and epidemiological studies demonstrate a role for some selenoproteins in exacerbating or promoting other disease states, specifically type 2 diabetes, although other data support a role of selenium in stimulating insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is clear that our understanding in the role of selenium in glucose metabolism and chemoprevention is inadequate and incomplete. Research exploring the role of selenium in individual healthcare is of upmost importance and possibly will help explain how selenium is a double-edged sword in the pathologies of chronic diseases. Keywords: selenium, supranutrition, type 2 diabetes, cancer Selenium is an essential micronutrient found in Brazil nuts, chicken, fish, turkey, crab, nuts, cereal and eggs. Both selenium toxicity and deficiency Continue reading >>

Five Ways Selenium Can Help Save Your Health

Five Ways Selenium Can Help Save Your Health

Selenium is an essential mineral. Your body needs it to function. It protects your cellsand DNAfrom free radical damage. But you may not be getting enough. Selenium levels in soil vary from region to region. Concentrations of it are higher in the Midwest and Western areas of the U.S. than the South and Northeast. Poor soil quality and gastrointestinal illnesses put you at risk for low selenium levels. The problem is there are no clear signs of deficiency. Your first symptom could be low immunity, high blood sugar Or worse. Dont wait until you know you need more to start paying attention. Here are five ways selenium can help save your health: 1. Fights Cancer: Low selenium levels in blood, hair, and nail samples could indicate as much as a threefold increase in overall cancer risk. It can make you up to eight times more likely to develop thyroid cancer. One study found subjects supplementing with selenium lowered their risk for all cancer by 24%. And that effect rose to 36% in people who had the lowest baseline levels of it. 2. Lowers Diabetes Risk: You dont have to supplement to see a benefit from selenium Research in the journal Diabetes Care revealed subjects with selenium-rich diets lowered their type 2 diabetes risk by 24%. Oxidative stress and inflammation cause insulin resistance. The more insulin resistant you are, the higher your odds of developing type 2 diabetes. Selenium prevents inflammation. But it also helps control blood sugar levels. 4 This means it fights diabetes on two fronts. 3. Supports Thyroid Function: Your thyroid has some of the highest concentrations of selenium in your body. Having low levels means your thyroid wont be working at its best. Or eventually at all. It leads to thyroiditis. Thats an inflammation of this organ that makes it attack Continue reading >>

Can Selenium Cause Diabetes?

Can Selenium Cause Diabetes?

Selenium, a trace mineral and antioxidant that is essential to health, is typically surrounded in positive press. In fact, past studies have shown it can play a beneficial role in: • Cancer • Heart disease • HIV • Cognitive decline • Cataracts and macular degeneration • Cold sores and shingles • Osteoarthritis It is because of these very benefits that supplements containing selenium have increased in popularity in the United States, to the extent that close to one-quarter of Americans over 40 take a selenium supplement or multivitamin that includes selenium. However, this new study is a telling example of what happens when you get too much of a good thing -- often the benefits turn into risks. In the case of selenium, there is a fine line between the amount that is beneficial and the amount that is harmful. A daily dosage between 150-300mcg would be completely safe for the average adult. The study found that those with diabetes had an average of nearly 144 parts per billion (ppb) of selenium in their blood, compared with about 136 ppb for the non-diabetics; a small discrepancy, but a large difference in potential risk. Although it’s not known exactly why too much selenium may increase diabetes risk, it may do so by increasing insulin resistance. Past studies have also suggested a link between the mineral and diabetes, including the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, whose results were released in 2007. Also that year, a study that gave people selenium tablets to determine if it reduced their cancer risk was discontinued because participants experienced a high diabetes rate. So, again, resist the typical American approach of concluding that if a little is good, even more is better. This can frequently backfire when it comes to suppl Continue reading >>

Selenium - Diabetes And The Environment

Selenium - Diabetes And The Environment

Selenium is an essential trace element, but it can also be toxic at high doses. Most Americans have high levels of selenium intake as compared to people in some other countries, due to the higher levels of selenium in U.S. soils as well as the use of dietary supplements containing selenium ( Laclaustra et al. 2009 ). High levels of selenium have been found in streams subject to mountaintop mining and valley fills in central Appalachia. In some streams, selenium has bioaccumulated to four times the toxic level in the food chain, a level that can cause harm in fish and birds. Groundwater wells are also affected, and state advisories are in effect for consumption of fish due to high selenium levels ( Palmer et al. 2010 ). There is a high prevalence of diabetes in many counties in central Appalachia ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2009 ). A Iranian trial of selenium supplementation in people with diabetic nephropathy found that it had beneficial effects on insulin resistance, insulin levels, and beta cell function ( Bahmani et al. 2015), as well as markers of inflammation and oxidative stress ( Bahmani et al. 2016). Another Iranian trial of selenium supplementation in people with diabetes and coronary heart disease also found that it had beneficial effects in insulin resistance, insulin levels, and beta cell function ( Farrokhian et al. 2016). Insulin Resistance, Body Weight, and Metabolic Syndrome In a study from Spain, adults with higher selenium levels had higher total cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels, which are components of the metabolic syndrome ( Gonzlez-Estecha et al. 2017). A review of metabolic syndrome and selenium found that high levels may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome. In people with adequate selenium levels, supplementati Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Selenium Supplementation On Glucose Homeostasis And The Expression Of Genes Related To Glucose Metabolism

The Effect Of Selenium Supplementation On Glucose Homeostasis And The Expression Of Genes Related To Glucose Metabolism

The Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glucose Homeostasis and the Expression of Genes Related to Glucose Metabolism We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. The Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glucose Homeostasis and the Expression of Genes Related to Glucose Metabolism Ewa Jablonska, Edyta Reszka, [...], and Wojciech Wasowicz The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selenium supplementation on the expression of genes associated with glucose metabolism in humans, in order to explain the unclear relationship between selenium and the risk of diabetes. For gene expression analysis we used archival samples of cDNA from 76 non-diabetic subjects supplemented with selenium in the previous study. The supplementation period was six weeks and the daily dose of selenium was 200 g (as selenium yeast). Blood for mRNA isolation was collected at four time points: before supplementation, after two and four weeks of supplementation, and after four weeks of washout. The analysis included 15 genes encoding selected proteins involved in insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. In addition, HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose were measured at three and four time points, respectively. Selenium supplementation was associated with a significantly decreased level of HbA1c but not fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and significant down-regulation of seven genes: INSR, ADIPOR1, LDHA, PDHA, PDHB, MYC, and HIF1AN. These results suggest th Continue reading >>

Selenium And Metabolic Disorders: An Emphasis On Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Selenium And Metabolic Disorders: An Emphasis On Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Selenium and Metabolic Disorders: An Emphasis on Type 2 Diabetes Risk Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, 651 Ilalo St., Honolulu, HI 96813, USA; [email protected] (M.J.B.); [email protected] (L.A.S.) *Correspondence: [email protected] ; Tel.: +1-808-692-1506 Received 2015 Dec 31; Accepted 2016 Feb 2. Copyright 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons by Attribution (CC-BY) license ( ). This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient that maintains biological functions through the action of Se containing proteins known as selenoproteins. Due to the known antioxidant effects of Se, supplements containing Se have been on the rise. While Se supplementation may be beneficial for Se deficient populations, few are at risk for Se deficiency due to the transportation of food from Se-rich regions and the rise of Se-enriched foods. Alarmingly, Se supplementation may have adverse effects in people who already receive an adequate Se supply. Specifically, an increased risk of type 2 diabetes has been reported in individuals with high baseline Se levels. However, this effect was restricted to males, suggesting the relationship between Se and glucose homeostasis may be sexually dimorphic. This review will discuss the current understanding of the interaction between Se and glucose homeostasis, including any sex differences that have been described. Keywords: selenium, selenoproteins, metabolic disease, trace element Dietary Selenium (Se) is critical for the synthesis of selenoproteins, which carry out the biological functions of Se. To date, 24 murine and 25 human s Continue reading >>

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