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Is Running Good For Diabetes

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does

Why Walking Can Prevent Diabetes More Than Running Does Science has given you permission to ramp down your workout Take a breather during your next workout: Walking might protect against diabetes more than running does, research from Duke University suggests. In the study, researchers had people with prediabetes a common condition where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the level to count as diabeteswalk briskly or jog 13.8 miles a week for 6 months. They discovered that those in the walking group showed nearly 6 times greater improvement in their glucose tolerancewhich measures how well their cells absorb blood sugarthan the joggers did. More research needs to be done to figure out why exactly walking seems more protective against diabetes than running, says study coauthor Cris A. Slentz, Ph.D. of Duke University. One possibility? When you perform moderate exerciselike walking three milesyour body taps into its stores of fatty acids to fuel it more than it does when you exercise vigorously, like if you jogged the same distance, he says. Thats good news for your diabetes risk: Too much fatty acids can make it harder for your body to process the hormone insulin. And if your body cant use insulin effectively, your cells wont be able to absorb blood sugar from your bloodstream. So your body cranks out more and more insulin to try to compensate. Eventually, you cant produce enough of it to effectively remove the blood sugar from your blood, which triggers prediabetes and diabetes. Related: How Walking Boosts Your Mood At Work Until further research is performed, its not quite clear whether walking affects the bodies of healthy guys in the same way it does for those who are prediabetic. Still, the findings apply to more guys than you may think: More than 1 out Continue reading >>

Running A Marathon With Diabetes

Running A Marathon With Diabetes

As Margot Forrest found, attitude is everything when going the distance with good health and diabetes. Running a marathon is a daunting task for any person. For Margot Forrest, 42, from Scotland, it took focus and commitment beyond what the average runner musters to train for and complete the 26.2-mile race. She's lived with type 1 diabetes for 20 years. Marathon training means she also has to overcome the ups and downs of her blood sugar levels. Heart-pumping workouts could often lead to hypoglycemia (also known informally as "the hypo"), in which her blood sugar dropped dangerously low. While some living with diabetes might cut back on exercise, Margot was determined to keep going. She found a new, first-of-its-kind technology to help her better monitor her glucose levels, so the only thing left to conquer was her mindset. With diabetes, attitude is everything. Balancing blood sugar while running With more exercise classes, Margot upped her fitness game in 2016. When her hard work caused her blood sugar to plummet, she had to stabilize it by ingesting more sugar. "I actually put on weight even though I felt really fit," she says. Margot asked her doctor for a solution and was sent to a specialist nurse, who introduced her to the FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitoring system, developed by Abbott. The FreeStyle Libre automatically reads glucose levels through a sensor, approximately the size of a U.S. quarter, that is worn on the back of the upper arm and eliminates the need for routine fingersticks1. The system also collects information on glucose patterns and trends, so she and her doctor have better insights on her glucose levels that help make more informed treatment decisions. Wearing the FreeStyle Libre system has changed her workouts. Before FreeStyle Libre, Ma Continue reading >>

Running With Type 2 Diabetes

Running With Type 2 Diabetes

We love hearing from our readers here at Fuel School, and this week we offer advice for the runner with Type 2 diabetes (we'll tackle Type 1 in a future post). Ask any runner, and they'll tell you that if you want to be a runner, you might have to have to make some adjustments. Adjustments to schedule (those early morning runs require a pre-dawn wake up call), adjustments to diet (room for more nutrients but less room for junk food), and adjustments to overall lifestyle and outlook (which might be just the change you're looking for). But for the runner with diabetes, adjustments may be necessary in meal planning, nutrient timing, medication, and even the run itself in order to maintain stable blood sugar levels before, during, and after activity. If you're overweight or obese and at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes (or already suffer from the disease), one of the best things you can do for your health is to stay active and lose weight. The calorie-burning benefits of running are well worth the effort of putting one foot in front of the other; regular exercise can reduce cardiovascular risk factors, accelerate weight loss efforts, improve body composition, improve insulin sensitivity, and even improve blood glucose control. The general recommendation for all of us is to accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week. If you're a runner with Type 2, keep the following tips in mind to exercise safely and gain health benefits while losing pounds. 1. Before starting any exercise program, check with your doctor first. When you talk to him or her about your health and blood sugar control, be sure to mention you're a runner. Not only will you likely get a pat on the back for your hard work, but you're also sure to get some helpful advice as to whether Continue reading >>

Fighting Diabetes By Running

Fighting Diabetes By Running

When you’re a young man, full of ambitions and natural strength you usually don’t care as much about your health as later in your life. So did I. There was a busy career in IT business which gave me the opportunity to travel all around my country, have an irregular time schedule for my meals and, last but not least, gain a lot of weight. There was my family and kids as well, my hobbies and a lot of other duties that kept me away from my personal healthcare. Just a little too long! I’m now 43, and about two years ago I went to the doctor’s for some really persistent kind of flu and the doc took some blood for the analysis. When he called me back to tell me about the results from the lab he gave me the good news about the flu which would go past and the bad news: I was suffering from diabetes mellitus and it seemed as if I already did for some years! The only good thing about it was the fact that I do not already need insulin but can help myself by medication. What followed literally was a marathon of further medical checkups and examinations and in the end I knew that not only the diabetes resulted from my unhealthy lifestyle and my weight, which was up to 125 kg with 1,76m height in my “best” days, but as well high blood pressure and a high heart rate. All of them really bad news which I really didn’t want to hear from the doctors. And in the end I now have to take three different pills every day which don’t cure the disease but just help to reduce the symptoms and future impact. At first I really asked myself whether that could be true. I had no pains at all. Nothing hurt me, no visual results of all of these critical diseases. And I tended to ignore those radical changes you have to make in your life. I knew that the pills wouldn’t heal me. I knew in Continue reading >>

Running Strong With Diabetes On Board

Running Strong With Diabetes On Board

I am not a runner. Back when I was younger, I did play baseball and soccer, both of which pretty much forced my hand (or my feet) to do some fast moving. But as soon as I was old enough and able to make it happen, I traded in those sports shoes for ones that didn't require running -- golf, swimming, biking, and just casual walking around the neighborhood when the mood to be on my feet really strikes. I'm always amazed to see fellow D-peeps embarking on huge treks, and I find myself a little envious of anyone who has the energy, patience, and ability to run successfully while navigating all the blood sugar and D-nuances that come with it -- especially those PWDs who do marathons and half-marathons. Wow! Lately, it seems there's been a wave of PWDs using their running to spread word about life with diabetes, and show that "You Can Do This." Yes, it does seem like everyone is running a marathon or halfie these days and in modern times, it's probably not as big a feat as it once was managing this type of run with diabetes on board. But for those of us who don't run or even think "I can't do this" for some reason, these stories are hugely important and can definitely show the world (and any doubters) that we can do it. Really, it makes me consider standing up right now and jogging in place... maybe. Here's a glimpse at some of the D-folk who've put on their running shoes and been making diabetes history lately: Corporate Lawyer Turned Ambassador of Sweat Robin Arzon is one of the newest faces in this group, as the 32-year-old New York woman was just diagnosed with type 1 about nine months ago and this past Sunday ran the New York City marathon. Her story's pretty remarkable, so much so that the New York Times ran an article about Robin and all she's been through -- getting h Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Run Safely With Diabetes

6 Ways To Run Safely With Diabetes

A team of medical professionals offer tips for a healthy run. Running is one of the easiest forms of fitness, but that doesnt mean youre doing it right. Poor technique, misinformation and bad preparation are common, and can lead to long-term injury, especially in people with Type 2 Diabetes. To provide an effective framework for runners with the condition, the medical team at Online Clinic has gathered advice on how to safely manage the condition, without sacrificing your fitness. Here are the top 6 tips for runners with diabetes: If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor before making lifestyle changes that involve your health, and mention that youre a runner. As you become more active, you may need to adjust your prescription so that your body keeps up with your fitness. According to Online Clinic medical adviser Dr. Hilary Jones, Managing Type 2 diabetes is extremely important, and a large part of this is following the right course of treatment. Energy boosting supplements may contain carbohydrates that prevent hypoglycemia, but consuming too much will reverse the caloric burn you get from running. If you need to get that energy before a long-distance run, get it from natural food sources. If you use insulin and see rising and falling blood sugar levels during your workout, change your diet and exercise regimes accordingly. Consider everything about your running strategy; it may be as simple as changing your route. Some people with diabetes are afraid that running could have a negative effect on their blood sugar, but fret not. If you control your diabetes carefully, eat well, and exercise in moderation, then you shouldnt have an increased risk of hypoglycemia. After a good run, insulin sensitivity lasts for about 24 to 72 hours. When it comes to scheduling, its i Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Eight Tips For Running With Diabetes

Eight Tips For Running With Diabetes

Walking is for everyone and provides tremendous health benefits, says Michael See, M.S., R.C.E.P., a clinical exercise physiologist at Joslin. Jogging is a great form of exercise for individuals who prefer to participate in a more vigorous exercise program, he adds.The following are his tips to get the benefits of a healthy running program: 1. Get your doctors clearance. People with diabetes should consult their healthcare providers if they want to go beyond purposeful walking, to make sure that they are not at risk for cardiovascular, orthopedic or other problems. 2. Walk before you run. Go from walking to running in a gradual process. Begin with purposeful walking (for half an hour or so), then combine walking and jogging, and then increase the jogging. 3. Wear the right footwear. Consult with an expert when you buy the shoes. Make sure that they fit well and are appropriate for running. 4. Dress appropriately. Dress in layers; wear absorbent materials close to skin to wick away perspiration and an outer layer to protect you from the wind and other elements. Wear a reflective vest if youre out at night. 5. Find a partner or role model. Look in your community for running groups or clubs. Invite your neighbor or colleague to join together during lunch. If youre interested in going the distance and even maybe running a marathon, pair up with someone who has done it. 6. Keep a goal in mind. You may want to set your sights on an event such as a five-kilometer road race for charity. 7. Have a plan for managing your diabetes. Measure your blood sugar before and after the activity (and during it, if needed). Carry juice, a sports drink, a piece of fruit or glucose tablets. Keep a training log, recording your miles and your blood glucose readings. 8. Listen to your body. Star Continue reading >>

Running Well With Type 2 Diabetes A Personal Story

Running Well With Type 2 Diabetes A Personal Story

Diabetes Ireland > Running well with Type 2 Diabetes a personal story Running well with Type 2 Diabetes a personal story Brda Cormack is running the Dublin marathon for Diabetes, having been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes at 35 years old. She is based in Canada. She recounts her personal story of Type 2 Diabetes below. I never thought that I would become diabetic. Im young, physicallyfit and healthy. I was soupsetwhen I found out. Whats worse is that Im type two and completely different from the stereotype of a Type 2. There is no educational support or support groups here in Canada that are applicable to my situation. All of the information on Type 2 discusses diet and exercise however I already exercise 2 4 hrs a day so my diagnosis really didnt make any sense and was incredibly disheartening Photo:Brda at 32km in Edmonton Marathon 2015 But, Im a pretty determined person so I decided to turn a negative into a positive.To change my frame of mind,I began considering what else have I might haveput limits onor hadnt considered possible before the diagnosis. My first thought was running. My aunt in Kildare is a formermarathon runner. (22 under her belt I believe) I remember her taking me out for a 6 milerun at 16 years old with her running group and it was brutal! I admired her but never in a million years considered running one myself. So, I decided running a marathon would be a positive place to focus my energy and I signed up for my first marathon that same year. Im not fast. Running long distances and maintaining blood sugar levelsis incredibly difficult. Andmany times I second guessed my decision. (usually on any run over 13 miles.) There were tears, blood and lots of sweat lost along the way We asked Breda to share what works for her on the food front for her traini Continue reading >>

Walking Vs. Running: Which Is Really Best?

Walking Vs. Running: Which Is Really Best?

Let’s face it, not all of us were meant to run marathons or beat that 10-minute mile. But does that mean that we can’t get the same benefits as runners while walking? An article published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology found that running was no better than walking when it came to prevention of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and coronary heart disease. Yes, in terms of calories burned, running beats walking. But let’s look closer at those numbers. An article at Runner’s World looked at 15 male and 15 female college students with an average weight of 156 pounds. They compared two runs: a 10-minute mile while running versus walking a mile in an average of about 18 minutes. Afterwards participants sat for 30 minutes and waited for their metabolic rate to return to normal. Here is what researchers found. Calories per mile burned: Walking -88.9 Running -112.5 Not a huge difference, just 23.6 calories. So what does this mean? Walking and running are both effective cardio exercises that may improve your health. A study by the American Heart Association looked at data from runners and walkers aged from 18 to 80 years old, and looked at their health problems over a period of six years. Turns out the runners lowered their risk of heart disease by 4.5 percent while the walker lowered theirs by 9.3 percent. This doesn’t mean you can take a leisurely after-dinner stroll and hope to reap the same benefits as a run. While walking you need to expend just as much energy as running would. Walking Tips Move it. Find a brisk pace and stick to it. Keep going. You’ll have to walk longer to burn calories comparable to a run. Go the distance. Log your walking times, and create goals for time and distance. For those with joint pain, running som Continue reading >>

Are Endurance Athletes More Susceptible To Diabetes?

Are Endurance Athletes More Susceptible To Diabetes?

The counterintuitive theory has pervaded books, studies, and Reddit threads and is something of a rally cry for LCHF converts. But while there may be some benefit to monitoring insulin levels, there's no need to cut out all carbs quite yet. It was a hard bonk during a 16-mile race up New Zealand’s 6,000-foot Avalanche Peak in 2013 that made Felicity Thomas, an undergraduate engineering student at the nearby University of Canterbury, begin thinking about her blood sugar levels. She’d tried to follow the usual sports nutrition advice, sucking down sugary gels to replenish the carbohydrates that her muscles were burning and to keep her blood sugar levels stable, but she struggled to get the balance right and ended up crawling to the finish before throwing up in an ice-cream bucket. Surely, thought Thomas, there must be a better way of managing in-race fuel. As it happened, Thomas was an intern that summer at the university’s Center for Bioengineering, which was researching the clinical potential of continuous glucose monitors, or tiny sensors inserted under the skin of the abdomen that track blood sugar levels in real time. She took one of the expired monitors lying around the lab. If I could spot impending blood sugar lows before they happened, she wondered, would I be able to ward them off with a well-timed gel? Could I make myself bonk-proof? A week of self-experimentation convinced Thomas that the technique might be useful, and she soon embarked on a PhD studying the potential uses of glucose monitoring in athletes. But the outcome of her initial pilot study on ten runners and cyclists, which was published last year in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, wasn’t what she expected. Instead of bonk-inducing blood sugar lows, the more common problem in Continue reading >>

Walking Vs. Running - Diabetes Self-management

Walking Vs. Running - Diabetes Self-management

To walk or to run for exercise? This is most likely not a dilemma that most people face. After all, most Americans get very little exercise , and people who dont even walk very much whether out of habit or because of physical limitations are probably unlikely to suddenly take up running. But if youre in decent physical shape and already have a walking routine, you may be wondering what, if anything, you would gain by switching from walking to running. Two recently published studies help answer this question. The first study , published in April issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, aimed to find out how runners and walkers compare when it comes to weight loss. Based on questionnaires that 15,237 regular walkers and 32,216 runners each completed twice, with six years in between, the study found that walkers tend to expend less than half as much overall energy through exercise as runners do perhaps not a surprising finding. But what may be surprising is that the study also found greater benefits from running than walking when the same amount of energy was expended. As an article on the study at Physicians Briefing notes, both male and female walkers were found to expend less energy than runners through exercise at the beginning of the study, and they were also significantly heavier than runners on average. However, the study tried to overcome these differences by using a standard measure of energy expenditure called metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours when comparing walkers with runners before and after the six-year period. It turned out, though, that even with the same level of energy expended, running translated into better weight control than walking did. Each MET-hour of exercise per day was associated with a greater drop in body-mass ind Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why Some People With Diabetes Need To Run Or Jog A Bit

3 Reasons Why Some People With Diabetes Need To Run Or Jog A Bit

October 3, 2014 by David Mendosa A new study of more than 55,000 runners is huge good news for most people with diabetes who are too busy to dedicate a lot of time to physical activity. The experts have been telling us for years that working out is good for our health and happiness, but until now nobody knew how little physical activity we really need. Intensity is the key that researchers from Iowa State University, the University of South Carolina, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, and other institutions discovered. They published their new study last week in theJournal of the American College of Cardiology. The abstract of the study, Leisure-Time Running Reduces All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality Risk , is online. D.C. Lee, assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University, is the studys lead author, and his university gave me a copy of the full text at my request. Dr. Lee and his associates used the huge database of the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study , focusing on 55,137 runners. This is probably the largest study of runners ever, and what they found was remarkable: 1. The first of their three major findings was that the runners had a 30 percent lower risk of all-cause and a 45 percent lower risk of heart disease mortality compared with non-runners, no matter how they sliced and diced the numbers. These associations were consistent regardless of sex, age, BMI, health conditions, smoking status, and alcohol consumption, the study reported. These lower risks added up to a three-year greater life expectancy benefit for runners. 2. The second big finding was that even slow running and just running a little was associated with significant benefits in terms of life expectancy. 3. Thirdly, when people ran stayed with a running program, they also l Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes: Tips To Stay Healthy On The Road

Running With Diabetes: Tips To Stay Healthy On The Road

Running With Diabetes: Tips to Stay Healthy on the Road Running With Diabetes: Tips to Stay Healthy on the Road It's possible to run, be active and even do marathons when you have diabetes. In fact, it may even help you. If you have diabetes, here are a few tips to help you get inspired, put your running shoes on, and hit the open road. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. There is also another type that occurs in pregnancy called gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common with roughly 90 percent of diabetics with this type. Diabetes affects a huge number of the population, including 23 million adults and children in the United States (or 7.8 percent of the population) and about 2.5 million and an estimated half a million people who unknowingly have the condition in the United Kingdom. These numbers are on the rise particularly with the increasing rates of inactivity and obesity worldwide. Most shocking is the rising number of young people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, which used to be a condition only associated with adulthood. When someone has Type 2 diabetes, their body doesn't make enough insulin or it doesn't use it properly. This is known as insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, which is responsible for controlling blood sugars, lipid and protein metabolism. People with Type 2 diabetes often have a strong family history and tend to be overweight with a high waist circumference, often a marker for intra-abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Eating a balanced diet and exercising to lose weight are key to caring for Type 2 diabetes. To achieve a balanced diet, a person should eat meals rich in fruits and vegetables, use healthy oils such as olive oil, and eat lean proteins such as chicken or Continue reading >>

Running A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

Running A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

How to Run a Half Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes My name is Jacob Seltzer, I am 20 years old, and a Type 1 Diabetic. I was diagnosed with diabetes on my half birthday, November 21, 2011 at the ageof 15. I have had diabetes for roughly 5 years and I do not let it get in my way. I am currently going into my junior year of college at Stony BrookUniversity as an athletic training major. Recently, I decided to start up my own blog . My reasoning behind this was to spread awareness of the disease,better educate people, and most of all serve as a peer to help newly diagnosed diabetics cope with their disease. This blog, among so many others online today, will have to serve us as we work together to find a cure for this disease. I have alsoentered a contest from Runners Worldmagazine, to be featured on the cover of the December issue! Please vote for me at the Runners World website!! Running 26.2 miles sounds pleasant right? Im sure many people reading this disagree. Pleasant isnt the right word to use for long distance running. However, it is one of the most rewarding things that I have ever experienced. One thing that I have learned is training for this distance is not an easy thing to do. In fact, mentally it can be very draining. All runners experience the highs and lows of running while training for a marathon (or any other race), however, as a runner with diabetes, you literally experience highs and lows with running. There is no such thing as a perfect training strategy since everyone is different, but a beginner plan is the way to start off. My mom bought me a book consisting of three training plans for half marathons and three training plans for full marathons all of which include a taper period (shortened distances by the end of the training). In order to truly unders Continue reading >>

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