diabetestalk.net

Is Rice Bad For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is White Rice To Blame For Skyrocketing Type 2 Diabetes In China?

Is White Rice To Blame For Skyrocketing Type 2 Diabetes In China?

Rice has been a staple food for 5,000 years, yet some new studies and news headlines suggest that each additional daily serving of it increases your risk of type 2 diabetes by 11 percent. In the Nutritionfacts.org video below, Dr. Michael Greger reviews the research linking white rice consumption with the rise in type 2 diabetes, largely in Asian populations. The rate at which people in China and Japan are getting diabetes has skyrocketed in the past decade and is now very similar to the incidence in the United States. However, China has seven times less obesity and Japan has eight times less obesity than the United States. So what’s going on? China’s Diabetes Rate Has More Than Tripled, But Their Obesity Rate Has Not Looking at the data, Dr. Greger found that the rate of new type 2 diabetes diagnoses has sharply increased, while rice consumption has actually decreased by 30 percent. Pork, oil, and other meat consumption has sharply increased in the past 16 years. If the rise in meat consumption is to blame, then why do recent studies in Japan and China associate white rice intake with diabetes? Dr. Greger theorizes that it’s the addition of animal protein. When ingested, carbohydrates cause a spike in blood glucose, triggering the pancreas to secrete insulin. Studies show that when animal protein is added to refined carbs, that blood sugar spike is much higher. View Dr. Greger's Sources Continue reading >>

White Rice Intake And Incidence Of Type-2 Diabetes: Analysis Of Two Prospective Cohort Studies From Iran

White Rice Intake And Incidence Of Type-2 Diabetes: Analysis Of Two Prospective Cohort Studies From Iran

White rice intake and incidence of type-2 diabetes: analysis of two prospective cohort studies from Iran 1Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14117 Iran 2Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA 3Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 17413 Iran 1Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14117 Iran 4Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20850 USA 5Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center/Obesity Research Center,Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, 17413 Iran 3Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 17413 Iran 10The Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, 10029 New York USA 11Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 17413 Tehran Iran 12Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Bldg 1, Boston, 02115 MA USA 13Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Bldg 1, Boston, MA 02115 USA 14SAPHIR, the Scientific Association for Public Health in Iran , Boston, 02132 USA 1Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14117 Iran 2Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hop Continue reading >>

White Rice, Brown Rice, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Us Men And Women

White Rice, Brown Rice, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Us Men And Women

White Rice, Brown Rice, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women Dr. Qi Sun , MD, ScD, Dr. Donna Spiegelman , ScD, Dr. Rob M. van Dam , PhD, Dr. Michelle D. Holmes , MD, DrPH, Ms. Vasanti S. Malik , MSc, Dr. Walter C. Willett , MD, DrPH, and Dr. Frank B. Hu , MD, PhD Departments of Nutrition (Ms. Malik and Drs. Sun, van Dam, Willett, and Hu), Epidemiology (Ms. Malik and Drs. Spiegelman, van Dam, Holmes, Willett, and Hu), and Biostatistics (Dr. Spiegelman.), Harvard School of Public Health; the Channing Laboratory (Drs. van Dam, Holmes, Willett, and Hu), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School; all at Boston, MA 02115 Corresponding author: Qi Sun, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115. Tel: 617 432 7490 Fax: 617 432 2435, [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Arch Intern Med This article has been corrected. See the correction in volume 170 onpage1479. See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Because of a different degree of processing and nutrient contents, brown rice and white rice may have different effects on risk of type 2 diabetes. To prospectively examine white rice and brown rice consumptions in relation to type 2 diabetes risk in US men and women aged 2687 yr. The Health Professionals Follow-up Study (19862006) and the Nurses Health Study I (19842006) and II (19912005). We prospectively ascertained diet, lifestyle practices, and disease status among 39,765 men and 157,463 women in these cohorts. All participants were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline. Intake of white rice, brown rice, other foods, and nutrients was assessed at baseline and updated every 24 yea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

I Have Type 2 Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 2 Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks... medical appointments, taking medication, stopping smoking, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 2 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. Or how about another? Everything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are OK for people with Type 2 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Long gone are those days of “do's and don'ts”. The way to go nowadays is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. Try and make changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable in the long term; this will be different for each person diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes depending on your current diet and the goals you want to achieve. Many people with Type 2 diabetes make changes to their diet in order to achieve: good blood glucose control good blood fat levels good blood pressure There's a lot of evidence to say that your diet can affect all of these, so see a registered dietitian for specific advice and an eating plan that is tailored to your needs. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diabetes was diagnosed, you may have been Continue reading >>

White Rice Linked To Diabetes Risk

White Rice Linked To Diabetes Risk

Study: Eating White Rice Regularly Raises Diabetes Risk March 15, 2012 -- Eating white rice regularly, as is commonly done in many Asian countries, may increase risk for developing type 2 diabetes , a new study shows. Researchers looked at data from four studies: two in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (the U.S. and Australia). All participants were diabetes -free when the studies began. On average, people from Asian countries ate about four servings of white rice daily. Individuals in Western countries, however, ate less than five servings a week. The study found that the more servings of white rice a person eats per day, the greater their risk for developing type 2 diabetes , the form of diabetes most closely linked to obesity . According to the new study, diabetes risk rises by about 10% with each increased serving per day of white rice. The new findings appear in the journal BMJ. The study was not designed to show how white rice may increase the risk for diabetes, but researcher Qi Sun, MD, has some theories on the matter. White rice ranks high on the glycemic index , which means it can cause a sudden spike in blood sugar levels . White rice is also low in fiber that can help lower the risk for developing diabetes, Sun says. He is an instructor in medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Its not just white rice, either. Other white, starchy carbohydrates, such as white bread, white pasta, and white potatoes, will likely have the same effect if eaten often enough, he says. Sun suggests choosing whole grains instead of white carbs. This is not to say that a person can never eat white rice. It is all about moderation: Eating white rice one to two times per week is fine. Spyros Mezitis, MD, agrees that all white starchy f Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Rice? - The Wellthy Magazine

Can Diabetics Eat Rice? - The Wellthy Magazine

Expert-reviewed by Ashwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience Fact-checked by Aditya Nar, B.Pharm, MSc. Public Health and Health Economics As a diabetic, one of the first foods you are asked to give up is rice (and sugar, of course!). Which, lets face it, is not easy for most of us. But why do you have to give up something thats been part of your staple diet all your life? Do you have to eliminate it altogether? Are any healthier substitutes just as satisfying to the taste buds? Are all types of rice bad for you? Get all your diet queries solved and get one-on-one coaching to help reduce your blood sugar levels. Enrol for our Home-based Diabetes Management package , endorsed by Asias largest diabetes organization. To understand how rice causes fluctuations in blood sugar levels, you first need to understand what glycemic index or GI score is. GI is a score given to different food items (between 0-100) and indicates how they affect your blood sugar levels. For eg., refined sugar with a high GI of 100, instantly increases your blood sugar levels but a natural form like those found in fruits with a medium GI range increases it slowly.[1] You mustve figured out by now that you need to include food with a low or medium GI in your diet and try to avoid ones with a high GI. High GI foods fall in the range of 70 and above, medium GI foods in the range of 56 to 69, and low GI foods in the 55 or less range. The rice variety most of us eat unfortunately falls into the first category. However, you dont have to give it up completely (but dont start celebrating just yet). Is there a way to continue eating rice safely? Try other varieties of rice: Brown rice, wild rice or wholegrain basmati rice. Brown rice is white rice that ha Continue reading >>

Does White Rice Affect Diabetes?

Does White Rice Affect Diabetes?

Most people with diabetes keep an eye on their sugar intake, but starches from white rice, potatoes and even whole grains can also raise blood sugar levels. Getting just the right amount of carbohydrates in your diet is key to maintaining good blood sugar control to stay healthy with diabetes and prevent long-term complications. A cup of white rice contains around 53 grams of carbohydrates. By comparison, a slice of bread has around 15 grams of carbohydrates, which means that a cup of white rice is the equivalent of three and a half slices of bread. Brown rice has a similarly high carb content, with 46 grams per serving, or the equivalent of roughly three slices of bread. The amount of rice served with dishes like Asian stir-fries or as a side dish with Greek kebabs, for example, may be as much as 3 cups; this corresponds to a very large amount of carbs at once and can definitely affect your blood sugar. Glycemic Index Comparing the glycemic index of different carbohydrates can help you understand how quickly they can raise your blood sugar levels. Foods with a high glycemic index of 70 and above cause your blood sugar levels to peak within a short period of time, which is damaging for your blood vessels and nerves and can, over time, contribute to heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and stroke. Foods with a medium or low glycemic index, below 69 and below 55, respectively, are better options for diabetics. White rice typically has a glycemic index between 72 and 83, while the glycemic index of brown rice varies between 48 and 62. Best White Rice Choices If you enjoy the taste of white rice, white basmati and Moolgiri rice are better options for you because of their lower glycemic index rating, usually in the 50s. If you can't find these more exotic varieties, you Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Healthy eating is one of the best ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This type of diabetes is strongly linked to excess weight, so calorie reduction and the right kind of diabetes diet can go a long way toward an improvement in overall health. Among the most important components of good nutrition when you have type 2 diabetes are meals with the right mix of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats to keep your blood sugar as normal as possible throughout the day. With these basic building blocks in place, make sure to seek out particular foods and beverages that can give you an extra edge in managing type 2 diabetes, says Beth Reardon, RD, an integrative nutritionist in private practice in Boston and a senior nutrition adviser for Caring.com. Here are some foods to reach for to help you manage your diabetes better. Eat Brown Rice and Other Fiber-Rich Foods White rice has long been known to have a negative effect on blood sugar. Like most "white" foods, it causes blood sugar spikes. A moderate amount of healthy whole grains, such as brown rice, and other fiber-rich foods instead of processed grains may reduce the risk of complications like diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage resulting from high blood sugar. Brown rice is packed with fiber, an important component for diabetes management. “Because fiber is not digested by the body, it does not affect blood sugar levels,” Reardon says. “This helps keep blood sugar levels steady and may prevent glucose spikes.” Another way to add fiber to your diet is with beans and other legumes. Research published in April 2012 in Nutrition Journal showed that beans and rice eaten together do not cause as drastic a blood sugar spike as rice alone. Also, a study published in October 2016 in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agricu Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati rice, particularly wholegrain Basmati rice can and should be a regular addition to the diets of people who suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Basmati rice is a naturally low to medium energy food but as with all carbohydrate foods, it’s the portion size that is important: an average serving of boiled rice is 150-180g providing 207-248 calories; a small serving (100g) provides approximately 138 calories. By contrast a typical takeaway portion of fried rice is 300g providing 558 calories, so it’s important not to assume all rice types are the same. Wholegrain Basmati rice has the lowest GI (glycaemic index) of all rice types, which means once digested it releases its energy slowly keeping blood sugar levels more stable, which is a crucial part of diabetes management. On the other hand, sticky and risotto type rices have much higher GIs, so less suitable in a diabetic diet. The varying GIs of rice depends on the type of carbohydrate present in the grains. Basmati rice has the greatest amount of a type known as amylose which does not gelatinize during cooking and results in fluffy, separate grains. Whereas grains with more amylopectin burst on cooking resulting in sticky rice that can be eaten with chopsticks. The more intact the structure of a grain of rice the lower the GI because once consumed the particle size maintains intact for longer, slowing the digestive process. The higher quality brands of rice like Tilda have the technology to reject broken grains from their products, further guaranteeing the low GI of the rice. Steaming rice helps to better maintain the structure of the grain compared with boiled rice so generally steamed rice has a lower GI than boiled. Wholegrain Basmati rice is also a source of fibre which is important for gut health and improves bowe Continue reading >>

If White Rice Is Linked To Diabetes, What About China?

If White Rice Is Linked To Diabetes, What About China?

“The fact the cohorts used to determine this study’s conclusions (BMJ published meta analysis) failed to consider incredibly relevant diabetes confounders like family history of diabetes, socioeconomic status, and dietary consumption patterns, including the dietary consumption of other categories of refined grains, makes quantifying the effect on diabetes development due to white rice consumption from this data set impossible. And yet it was published in the BMJ?” At the end of the press release it says this: “In an accompanying editorial, Dr Bruce Neal from the University of Sydney suggests that more, bigger studies are needed to substantiate the research hypothesis that white rice increases the chances of getting type 2 diabetes.” But then the title says: “White Rice Increases Risk of Type 2 Diabetes” Im understandably upset at this. Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

More in diabetes