diabetestalk.net

Is Raw Banana Good For Diabetics

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

When a person has diabetes, they need to carefully consider the contents of each meal. This can be especially true for carbohydrate-containing food, which not only includes desserts and other sweet treats, but bread, pasta, and fresh fruits. One fruit that traditionally has been on the "avoid" list for those with diabetes is bananas. However, for the most part, bananas eaten in moderation can be safely enjoyed when a person has diabetes. Bananas grow on banana plants that can have anywhere from 50 to 150 bananas in each bunch of fruit. The individual bananas are sold in varying sizes, from small to extra-large, the size-grading being determined by their length. Nutritional breakdown Overall, bananas are low in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. They also have a good mix of nutrients, including vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese. However, some doctors and dietitians may give bananas greater nutritional scrutiny when considering them for people with diabetes, because bananas are high in sugar relative to their calories. One medium banana has an estimated glycemic load of 11, according to Harvard Health Publishing on glycemic loads. Glycemic load is a measure of a food's impact on blood sugar. A glycemic load of fewer than 10 is considered low, while one above 20 is high. Can you eat bananas if you have diabetes? Examples of lower-sugar fruit options include apples, grapes, and pears. Fruits with higher sugar levels include papayas and pineapples. However, those with diabetes do not have to eliminate bananas from their diet, or any other fruit for that matter. Their other nutritional values in terms of vitamins and minerals can make them a healthy option for those with diabetes when consumed in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommend incorporating fr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? By Amy Reeder, Registered Dietitian and CDE No Comments Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Bananas are a healthy way to get nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. However, bananas sometimes tend to get a bad rap, even from doctors. In an internet search, you might frequently run into informational advertisements with bananas as part of the list of the five foods you should never eat. Never eat? That seems a little extreme, especially if you know your nutrition facts about this fruit. Bananas are fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free. But it is important to understand that bananas are NOT carbohydrate free! And figuring the carbohydrate content of a banana can be tricky because the content varies with size. Use this chart when calculating the carb content of the bananas you eat (measure once and eyeball thereafter): From small to large bananas in that scale, you will get anywhere from two to four grams of fiber per serving, depending on the size. Obviously the larger the banana, the higher the fiber, potassium, and vitamin C content, but that also comes with higher carbohydrate content. Of the 30 grams of carbohydrate in a medium banana, 19 grams are sugar and the other 11 grams are starch, including three grams of fiber. A fully ripe banana has a glycemic index of 51this would be considered a low-glycemic index food, as the cutoff is 55. In addition, the ripeness of a banana changes its glycemic index. An under-ripe banana with visible green sections on the peel would have a glycemic index of approximately 42, while an over-ripe banana w Continue reading >>

Bananas And Diabetes: Are Bananas Good For Diabetics?

Bananas And Diabetes: Are Bananas Good For Diabetics?

Can bananas and diabetes go hand-in-hand? It goes without saying that diabetics need to be careful about their blood glucose levels. A careful ‘goldilocks’ level needs to be struck—not too high and not too low. The problem is that some foods can unexpectedly skew a diabetic’s blood sugar and cause adverse effects. Take the common banana, for instance. Although diabetics can have fruit, as long as they are aware of the glucose level, bananas have a noticeably higher glucose and carb content. Eating a banana and expecting an effect similar to an apple can result in an unwanted spike in blood sugar and, in the worst case, trigger a hyperglycemic episode. It is for this reason that some diabetic diets discourage eating bananas, but the truth is that they can be eaten safely. It just takes a bit of prudence. Ad Most people resign themselves to the fact that once they hit a certain age and start having bladder control issues, that all is lost. And that’s just simply not true. In fact, there is a bladder control solution right now in your kitchen, that you or your doctor might have never known about. Find out more here.. What’s the Big Deal About Bananas? Glycemic index of bananas: To understand why bananas would be a special concern to diabetics, it helps to look at the Glycemic Index. This is an impressive database that aims to quantify the relative impact that carbohydrates will have on your blood glucose level. Every food in the index contains a glycemic index rating, which assesses how high and for how long the food will raise your blood sugar, and a glycemic load rating, which is a combined value that consists of the combined quality and quantity ratings of the carbohydrates. The formula used to calculate all this is a very dense read to explain, but the main Continue reading >>

Raw Banana Starch As Resistant Starch | Resistant Starch

Raw Banana Starch As Resistant Starch | Resistant Starch

Green Bananas are good source of resistant starch. Is green banana flour? Raw Banana Flour is now being promoted as a natural source of resistant starch. At first glance, it seems to be an ideal ingredient for supplementation. Maybe, maybe not There are a few caveats to consider: 1. Under-ripe bananas are an excellent source of resistant starch, but as the bananas ripen, the starch naturally converts to sugar. Are the extracted ingredients standardized on the quantity of resistant starch in any way? Unless each batch is measured, youve got no way of knowing how much resistant starch is actually there. Unless you can verify what youre getting, you can assume that youre getting whatever is cheapest to produce. 2. Like most natural sourced resistant starch, it is not process tolerant and will cook out (lose its resistant starch content) when baked into bread, heated or otherwise processed. No, banana bread made with raw banana flour will NOT be a good source of resistant starch! Those writers and articles that claim that it does are simply misinformed (likely just wrong). 3. Only three clinical studies have investigated their health benefits. They appear insufficient but promising. They are a. Dr. Jorge Ble-Castillo and his colleagues in Mexico published an article in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health in 2010 that highlights some of the questions. Obese individuals with type 2 diabetes consumed 24 grams of native banana starch each day for 4 weeks, which was measured to contain 8 grams of resistant starch. Plasma insulin and insulin resistance were reduced after the individuals consumed the native banana starch, but the results were not significant when compared to the control (24 g. of soy milk powder). However, the individuals lost mo Continue reading >>

7 Amazing Green Banana Benefits You May Not Have Known

7 Amazing Green Banana Benefits You May Not Have Known

7 Amazing Green Banana Benefits You May Not Have Known 7 Amazing Green Banana Benefits You May Not Have Known Sushmita Sengupta | Updated: April 18, 2018 11:50 IST You know a fruit is powerhouse of nutrients when it can be savoured equally both in its raw and ripe forms. Not many fruits around the world enjoy such a massive fan following. Banana is one such fruit, which is mainstay in every fruit basket around the globe. In India however, bananas are also cherished in their raw form. Green banana or kaccha kela is part of many savoury Indian preparations . It can be steamed, boiled, stir-fried, batter-fried, deep-fried, mashed and curried, and also be used as a stuffing, in salads or in dips. In Kerala, you can also find chips made of raw banana. Macrobiotic nutritionist and Health practitioner Shilpa Arora says, "Green bananas are full of fibre with are good for people with digestive and bowel problems. It is especially beneficial for people with IBS and constipation. It is loaded with potassium, which acts as a vasodilator. Potassium helps in regulating blood pressure levels. It is a powerhouse of nutrients, that works effectively for diabetics. It enables slow release in sugar. Greenbanana needs to be cooked for better absorption of nutrients. Green bananas are an excellent source of fibre. Fibres play an essential role in ensuring digestive health as well as our heart health. About 100 grams of banana has 2.6 grams of fibre. Fibres add bulk to the stool, aiding bowel regularity and facilitating smooth digestion. Consuming foods rich in fibre helps maintaining blood sugar levels. Fibres also ensure low cholesterol levels, which in turn reduces risk of stroke or attack. Green bananas are an excellent source of fibre. Just like the ripe bananas, green bananas too are Continue reading >>

Green Bananas: A Diabetes-friendly Snack

Green Bananas: A Diabetes-friendly Snack

(Content Updated 3/23/2017) By Joy Stephenson-Laws and the pH health care professionals Bananas are one of the most popular fruits around. In fact, they seem to be America’s favorite fruit, according to the USDA. The average American eats 27 pounds of bananas a year, and it’s no wonder! They’re high in potassium, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins B6 and C. But what you may not know about bananas is that you don’t have to wait for them to turn yellow to enjoy them. In fact, there may be benefits of eating them green that you don’t get when they’re ripe. Both green and yellow bananas have their own perks, but people who have diabetes should lean toward the green ones. What are the benefits of green bananas for a person with diabetes? You may have noticed that bananas get sweeter as they ripen. This is because the bananas’ chemical composition changes through the ripening process, turning from starch to sugar. This means the green, unripe bananas have much less sugar than the fully ripe bananas. Additionally, recent research shows resistant starch, found in green bananas, may improve insulin sensitivity. Resistant starch is a type of starch that “resists” digestion, thereby acting like fiber and making you feel full longer. However, when it is cooked, most of the starch in a green banana becomes highly digestible and is no longer “resistant.” Resistant starch has also shown promise for being a natural weight loss tool. However, if you’re like the average American, you probably don’t get nearly enough resistant starch in your diet. A typical Western diet contains highly digestible starches that have a high glycemic index. Foods like potatoes, rice, pasta, cereals and breads are low in resistant starch. Cooked legumes, peas and green bananas Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Why Diabetics Should Eat Unripe Bananas, And Everyone Must Too

10 Reasons Why Diabetics Should Eat Unripe Bananas, And Everyone Must Too

Bananas are no doubt very beneficial to our health. It offers a lot of amazing health benefits that could help our body to nourish well and encounter several free radicals because it is high in antioxidant. Banana is also considered as one of the healthiest foods in the world. Bananas are good for your heart. They are packed with potassium, a mineral electrolyte that keeps electricity flowing throughout your body, which is required to keep your heart beating. Bananas’ high potassium and low sodium content may also help protect your cardiovascular system against high blood pressure, according to the FDA. Aside from being very nutritious, banana is also a highly convenient snack food. Here are 11 health benefits of bananas that are supported by scientific research. BANANAS CONTAIN MANY IMPORTANT NUTRIENTS Bananas are among the most popular fruits on earth. Native to Southeast Asia, they are now grown in many warmer parts of the world. There are any types of bananas available, which may vary in color, size and shape. The most common type is the yellow banana, which is green when unripe. What it look like when ripe: Bananas contain a fair amount of fiber, as well as several antioxidants. One medium-sized banana (118 grams) also contains: Potassium: 9% of the RDI. Vitamin B6: 33% of the RDI. Vitamin C: 11% of the RDI. Magnesium: 8% of the RDI. Copper: 10% of the RDI. Manganese: 14% of the RDI. Net carbs: 24 grams. Fiber: 3.1 grams. Protein: 1.3 grams. Fat: 0.4 grams. Each banana contains only about 105 calories and consists almost exclusively of water and carbs. Bananas contain very little protein and almost no fat. The carbs in unripe (green) bananas consist mostly of starch and resistant starch, but as the banana ripens, the starch turns into sugar (glucose, fructose, an Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

15 Facts About Banana For Diabetes (#you Must Know)

15 Facts About Banana For Diabetes (#you Must Know)

Diabetes patients should concern about the amount intake of carbohydrate as well as the kind of it. The insulin hormone divides carbohydrate and change it into glucose that gives you energy to work. Diabetes patients have problem with their insulin. Besides, their glucose level in their body is higher. Almost all of fruits are rich of carbohydrate. It makes diabetes patients face difficulties in dealing with their glucose level. Yet, carbohydrate is important nutrition for us. Sponsors Link One of the fruits that diabetes patients should be aware of is banana. Banana is the source of fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. Those three nutrition are important for diabetes patients. However, we should know that banana contains carbohydrate. Thus, diabetes patients should smartly manage the portion of banana that can be consumed. Moreover, the size of banana is various. It makes the carbohydrate counting difficult. The 5 size estimation of bananas and the content of their carbohydrate: Extra small banana (6 inches long or less) contains 18.5 grams of carbohydrate Small banana (about 6-6 7/8 inches long) contains 23 grams of carbohydrate Medium banana (7-7 7/8 inches long) contains 27 grams of carbohydrate Large banana (8-8 7/8 inches long) contains 31 grams of carbohydrate Extra large banana (9 inches or longer) contains 35 grams of carbohydrate. 15 Connection between Diabetes and Banana: 1. Ripe Banana. Ideally, diabetes patients should not consume banana, especially the ripe one. Based on a study, people who eat ripe banana have high response to glycemic. It means the level of their blood sugar is drastically increasing. As a result, they demand more insulin. 2. Half Ripe Banana. People who eat half ripe banana show low glycemic response. The experts say that 90% of carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Will Bananas Raise Blood Sugar?

Will Bananas Raise Blood Sugar?

If you have or are at risk for diabetes it is important to control your blood sugar levels through diet and exercise. Different foods affect blood sugar levels differently and each person with diabetes has unique responses to food. A physician or registered dietitian can help in formulating a healthy eating plan, which should include plenty of fruits and vegetables. However, even healthy foods such as bananas can raise blood sugar levels too much, so it is important to test often. Video of the Day After eating, the body breaks down the food into glucose or blood sugar to provide the body with energy. The hormone insulin must be present in order for the cells to use the glucose. Having diabetes means that the body either does not produce insulin or is unable to use it properly, which means blood sugar levels can get too high. Over time, high blood sugar levels can lead to vision problems, heart disease, damage to the kidneys and damage to the nerves. A large part of preventing diabetes related complications, is eating a healthy diet that keeps blood sugar levels within the range given to you by your doctor. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that affects blood glucose levels. Diabetics have to watch not just how many carbohydrates are eaten, but the type as well. Carbohydrates that come in the form of processed or refined grains such as white bread, white rice, potatoes and baked goods, tend to be digested very quickly. They can cause blood sugar levels to spike and drop, making diabetes harder to control. Carbohydrate sources such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains are digested more slowly, which helps to keep blood sugar levels in check. However, even healthy carbohydrates such as bananas need to be eaten in moderation and the best way to tell how a food affec Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? How much sugar does a banana have? Perhaps these are the most frequently asked questions from people who are suffering from diabetes health condition. And the answer is Yes, as long as they are unripe or semi-ripe and you don’t overdo it and eat a whole dozen. The rest of this article explains why. Diabetics Need to Watch Their Carbs All carbohydrates we eat turn into sugar in our body. Insulin is needed to take this sugar into cells. People suffering from Type-2 diabetes usually have two problems; one, their pancreas don’t produce as much insulin as their bodies can use and two, their cells are not very sensitive to insulin. The result: blood sugar can shoot up. That’s why diabetics need to watch their carbs. Bananas are full of good stuff; in addition to carbs (around 30 grams in an average-sized banana), they are loaded with fiber, Vitamins B6 and C, manganese, copper and potassium. RELATED: 17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications Bananas Have a Low GI Index Overall, bananas have a low glycemic index (GI), the score that measures how much a food increases your blood sugar level when you eat it. The lower the GI, the better. Where a 30-gram serving of brown bread has a glycemic index of 69, a 120-gram serving of raw banana has a glycemic index of just 48. You can also create your own healthy dessert by sprinkling powdered cinnamon on sliced or diced bananas. The health benefits of cinnamon for a diabetic individual are explained here. Ripe vs Unripe: The Crucial Difference for Diabetics Ripe bananas contain 10% fiber, which is good for everyone, including people with diabetes; however, they also contain 8% carbohydrates, which increases blood sugar levels sharply. This is because the starch in the banana has been converte Continue reading >>

Does Green Plantain Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Does Green Plantain Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Does Green Plantain Raise Your Blood Sugar? Written by Jessica Bruso; Updated November 28, 2017 Any food that contains carbohydrates, such as plantains, can potentially raise your blood sugar. The effect of green plantains on your blood sugar will depend in part on how much you eat, how they are prepared and what other foods you eat at the same time. Eating green plantains is likely to increase your blood sugar levels a moderate amount because of their carbohydrate content and glycemic load, but you can take steps to minimize this increase. Green plantains count as starchy vegetables in a diabetes diet and are relatively high in carbohydrates. Prepare them without added fat, sugar or salt, and they are one of the best starchy vegetable options, according to the American Diabetes Association. A one-half-cup serving of sliced plantains, either cooked or raw, has about 24 grams of carbohydrates. If you choose fried green plantains, a one-half-cup serving has about 29 grams of carbohydrates, along with almost 7 grams of added fat. Diabetics should usually eat between 45 and 75 grams of carbohydrates per meal. The glycemic index helps estimate how much a particular food is likely to increase your blood sugar levels, with foods having scores of 55 or less being low on the glycemic index and unlikely to cause a large increase in blood sugar, and those foods having scores above 75 being more likely to cause spikes in blood sugar levels. Green plantains have a glycemic index of 40, which means they will have a slow but sustained impact on your blood sugar. Glycemic load scores provide an even more accurate estimate of the effect of a food on blood sugar levels because they take into account not only the glycemic index, but also the portion size of the food. A score of 10 or bel Continue reading >>

Fried Green Bananas. Sounds Yuk But Really Yum.

Fried Green Bananas. Sounds Yuk But Really Yum.

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Fried green bananas. Sounds yuk but really yum. Has anyone one here tried fried green bananas. I just tried them for the first time today and they were quite amazing. When raw they are some type of totally inedible starch that tastes absolutely awful, I mean horrible to even touch a tiny bit on your tongue, but when sliced and fried they were almost exactly like potato chips! The reason I tried them is that I've heard they are really high in resistant starch, a form which is actually good for diabetics. I've tested and they really don't spike my BGLs at all! I ate them with fried eggs for breakfast btw. Also, these weren't the "plantain" type that apparently are sold like this for cooking, these were just normal green (unripe) bananas from the banana plants in my back yard. Whoops, they were so nice that I ate them too quickly to even think to take a photo, so here is one I've lifted from the net. Mine weren't quite as nice and regularly shaped as these ones, but roughly similar looking, and I'm sure they tasted just as good. well I have heard that bananas are about the worst fruit for diabetics, especially because of the starch.... it sounds delicious though.. resistance starch... hmmm. ? well I have heard that bananas are about the worst fruit for diabetics, especially because of the starch.... Yes I thought the same thing Freema. However they are like a completely different food when green compared to ripe. As they ripen the (initially inedible) starch is converted into easily digested sugars and they become sweet and delicious, but bad for diabetics. When they are green however they contain no sugar. Yes they do still contain starch, but apparentl Continue reading >>

Will Bananas Raise Blood Sugar?

Will Bananas Raise Blood Sugar?

Bananas are a good source of potassium, fiber, vitamin C and vitamin B-6. As they ripen, the starch they contain turns into sugars, with riper bananas containing more sugar than green bananas. While they can be high in natural sugars, bananas are safe for diabetics as long as they take the carbohydrate content into account in their meal and snack planning. Carbohydrates are the type of macronutrient most likely to raise blood sugar levels. Bananas are relatively high in carbohydrates, with each medium banana containing 27 grams of carbs. Of these carbohydrates, 3 grams consist of fiber, 14 grams are sugars and 6 grams are starch. Sugars are the most rapidly digested type of carbohydrate, as starch has to be broken down into sugars by digestive enzymes. Fiber can't be digested at all because humans lack the enzymes necessary to break the bonds forming groups of sugars into fiber. Glycemic Index One of the ways to estimate the effect of a food on your blood sugar levels is to use the glycemic index, which compares the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on blood sugar with the effect of pure glucose on blood sugar. Foods with a glycemic index under 55 are low-glycemic index foods and unlikely to cause large increases in your blood sugar levels. Bananas fall into this group with a glycemic index of 52. Limiting Blood Sugar Spikes Even foods low on the glycemic index will cause blood sugar spikes if you eat a lot of them, so watch your serving size. Eating foods that are high in carbohydrates or high on the glycemic index along with foods that don't contain much carbohydrate or foods that are very low on the glycemic index will help minimize increases in your blood sugar levels, since these foods typically make it so your meal takes longer to digest. This means glucose Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Green Bananas

Health Benefits Of Green Bananas

Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. bunches of green bananasPhoto Credit: Baloncici/iStock/Getty Images Although the green banana is simply an unripened yellow banana, it has different uses. While you can eat the yellow banana immediately after peeling, the green banana is best eaten cooked, either boiled or fried. Nutritionally, the green banana is a good source of fiber, vitamins and minerals, and contains a starch that may help control blood sugar, manage weight and lower blood cholesterol levels. Resistant starch is a type of starch that cannot be broken down by enzymes in your digestive system and, therefore, acts more like a fiber than a starch. Green bananas contain a high amount of resistant starch, according to a 2010 article published in "Pacific Health Dialog." Including foods high in resistant starch in your diet, like the green banana, may reduce your risk of diabetes by aiding in blood sugar control,and heart disease by helping to lower blood cholesterol levels. In addition to the resistant starch, green bananas are also a good source of fiber. A 1-cup serving of boiled green bananas contains 3.6 grams of fiber, meeting 14 percent of your daily value. The percent daily value is based on a 2,000-calorie diet for a healthy adult. Fiber can also reduce risk of diabetes and heart disease. In addition, fiber in food slows digestion, helping you feel full longer, aiding in weight control. Like the ripened yellow banana, the green banana is high in potassium. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes