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Is Raisin Bran Good For A Diabetic?

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Diabetes Super Foods

Diabetes Super Foods

Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Fortunately, your food “prescription” includes filling, flavorful fare that tastes like anything but medicine. A diet rich in these 10 “super foods” will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse. Dig in! 1. Vegetables. The advantages of eating more vegetables are undeniable. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with more vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes and corn, and legumes such as lima beans and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 2. Fruit. It has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, so you can’t eat it with utter abandon, but fruit has almost all the advantages that vegetables do — it’s brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s relatively low in calories compared with most other foods. Best of all, it’s loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Strive to make most of your fruit servings real produce, not juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit are eliminated during juicing, and the calories and sugar are concentrated in juice. 3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source Continue reading >>

Consuming Cereal As A ‘low-carb’ Means Of Battling Diabetes? This Is A Joke, Right?

Consuming Cereal As A ‘low-carb’ Means Of Battling Diabetes? This Is A Joke, Right?

Because my blog regularly addresses important health and nutrition issues related to a wide variety of subjects on such a regular basis, my e-mail box is filled with information from public relations companies galore all trying to get their message out there. Some represent non-profit organizations who are trying to increase awareness while others speak for companies who all try to give their angle of an issue to capitalize on it for marketing their business. I don’t have a problem with this practice except when it so laughably crosses the line of reality like what happened this week. While most of these kind of e-mails almost immediately end up in File 13 as quickly as I receive them, one stuck out to me because of the subject line: Low Carb Tips for Diabetes Awareness Month. Oh, now this is interesting! I’ve actually received some good messages from this same PR company before, so I decided to read on. As I perused the press release, I literally could not believe what I was reading. Although this was billed as “Low Carb Tips on National Diabetes Awareness Month,” the content was all about how “adding whole grains to your diet…can decrease your chances of developing diabetes.” “Cereal fiber has been found to be more effective than other types of fiber due to the combination of antioxidants and soluble and insoluble fiber,” the press released declared. They listed Post Raisin Bran and Post Shredded Wheat as two of the best ways to get whole grain fiber into your diet. They even pushed two new flavors of the Shredded Wheat — Vanilla Almond and Honey Nut — and offered to send me samples (why would I want samples of something that OBVIOUSLY had double-digit carb counts?). I was so stunned by the notion that high-carb cereal would even be promoted to d Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Raisins Eating raisins or other dried fruits may be a better option than snacking on cookies, but it’ll still spike your blood sugar. Why? During the dehydration process, fruits’ natural sugars become very concentrated, causing an unhealthy elevation in blood sugar when they are rapidly absorbed by the body. Just one more reason to stick with whole, fresh fruit options like grapefruit, cantaloupe, strawberries, and peaches. Previous Next More Photos Pancakes and Syrup Fruit Juice Continue reading >>

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet Tips For People With Diabetes And Kidney Disease

Diet is one of the most important treatments in managing diabetes and kidney disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease as a result of diabetes, you’ll need to work with a dietitian to create an eating plan that’s right for you. This plan will help manage your blood glucose levels and reduce the amount of waste and fluid your kidneys process. Which nutrients do I need to regulate? Your dietitian will give you nutritional guidelines that tell you how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you can eat, as well as how much potassium, phosphorus and sodium you can have each day. Because your diet needs to be lower in these minerals, you’ll limit or avoid certain foods, while planning your meals. Portion control is also important. Talk to your dietitian regarding tips for accurately measuring a serving size. What may be measured as one serving on a regular diet may count as three servings on the kidney diet. Your doctor and dietitian will also recommend you eat meals and snacks of the same size and calorie/carbohydrate content at certain times of the day to keep your blood glucose at an even level. .It’s important to check blood glucose levels often and share the results with your doctor. What can I eat? Below is an example of food choices that are usually recommended on a typical renal diabetic diet. This list is based on sodium, potassium, phosphorus and high sugar content of foods included. Ask your dietitian if you can have any of these listed foods and make sure you know what the recommended serving size should be. Carbohydrate Foods Milk and nondairy Recommended Avoid Skim or fat-free milk, non-dairy creamer, plain yogurt, sugar-free yogurt, sugar-free pudding, sugar-free ice cream, sugar-free nondairy frozen desserts* *Portions of dairy products are o Continue reading >>

Which Cold Cereals Can Diabetics Eat

Which Cold Cereals Can Diabetics Eat

Diabetics need to pay close attention to the amount and type of carbohydrates they eat. Cold cereals are an easy and convenient breakfast option if you are on the go, but many types of cereals have a high carbohydrate content, mainly from added sugar or refined flours that can quickly elevate your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, choose cold cereals that have a lower glycemic index and keep your portions small to prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. Muesli Muesli and granola-type breakfast cereals are very dense, and only a small portion, or between 1/4 to 1/2 cup, is necessary start your day with enough energy. Choose a muesli that is free of added sugars and check the ingredient list to ensure it is mainly made from oat flakes, nuts and dried fruits to guarantee a lower glycemic index option. Low GI foods will help you keep your blood sugar levels more stable throughout the morning, whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Do not add sugar to your muesli, and serve it with plain yogurt or milk. Large Oat Flakes You may eat oat flakes cooked as a hot cereal, but they can also be eaten raw as a cold cereal. Choose large oat flakes or steel-cut oats, which have a lower glycemic index. Add raw nuts, milk or plain yogurt and enjoy. Avoid adding extra sugar, but you can add a handful of berries for a touch of sweetness that won't lead to high blood sugar levels. Cook quinoa ahead of time, according to the package instructions, and keep it in the fridge for a quick cold breakfast cereal option. Quinoa is a healthy whole grain that contains slowly digested carbohydrates to help you keep your blood sugar levels in the healthy range. Add a bit of milk or plain yogurt, nuts and fruit as desired, but keep your serving size between 1/2 and 1 cup for moderate carb Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals | Diabetes Uk

Breakfast Cereals | Diabetes Uk

Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they need a higher than normal dose in order to prevent these birth defect Continue reading >>

What Cereals Are Recommended For People With Diabetes?

What Cereals Are Recommended For People With Diabetes?

The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes choose whole-grain, high-fiber and low-sugar cereals. Be careful, however, when choosing “whole-grain cereals.” Many manufacturers know that consumers are looking for whole-grain products and they may advertise products as containing whole grains when there's very little whole grain in them. If the source of whole grain is not listed as the first ingredient, then it probably contains very little. Video of the Day Choose whole-grain ingredients that appear first on the food label. Brown rice, whole oats, whole rye, whole wheat, wild rice, bulgur, triticale, millet, quinoa and sorghum are examples of types of whole grains in cereals. The first ingredient in Post Grape-Nuts cereal is whole-grain wheat flour. The first ingredient in Post Shredded Wheat cereal is whole wheat, and for the Weetabix biscuit cereal the first ingredient is whole wheat. A number of other brands such as Barbara’s, Cascadian Farms, Bob’s Red Mill, Kashi and Nature’s Path also make whole-grain cereals. Eating foods high in fiber helps to regulate your blood sugar levels by slowing down the digestive process. Fiber is found in whole grains. The American Diabetes Association recommends choosing cereals that contain 3 grams or more of fiber per serving. Post Shredded Wheat contains 6 grams of dietary fiber per serving. Post Grape-Nuts contains 7 grams of dietary fiber per serving, and Weetabix contains 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving. Stay away from whole-grain cereals with added sugars. Choose cereals with a very low amount of sugar -- less than 6 g, recommends the American Diabetes Association. Post Shredded Wheat contains 0 g of sugar per serving. Post Grape-Nuts contains 5 g of sugar per serving, and Weetabix conta Continue reading >>

Cold Cereals ? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Cold Cereals ? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Has anybody found a good cold cereal to eat for breakfast that doesn't taste like cardboard ? I tried raisin bran, didn't put any sugar on it, and my numbers I'm getting sick of oatmeal every morning ! I actually found one I like. Kellogg’s Special K protein plus with a Atkins milk shake instead of milk. The Kellogg’s is 9 net carbs...the Atkins is 1 net carb. Added together they give me about 40 percent of my protein..I forget how many calories ...but I am trying to gain weight not lose. The Atkins shakes are pricy but I think the special k would work with other types of milk. Oh, I always eat some sort of protein ....turkey bacon or regular sausage that seems to help hold my numbers down. Had to give up all cold cereals! I do enjoy a hot cereal called Hodgson Mill Multi-grain cereal with soy and flax. I love cereal, but it doesn't love me back. I gave up eating cereal after my diagnosis. I've never been an oatmeal fan. My favorite cereal was Honey Bunches of Oats with strawberries. I really miss it. I'm not surprised raisin bran made you spike. It has 46g of carbs per serving, contains high fructose corn syrup along with sugar and raisins which all raise bg. If you drank it with milk, that could push up your bg even further. Anything with more than 15g of carbs tends to spike me. Forget cereal, it is all grain based and highly processed anyway. Go for eggs. Add a piece of cheese for protein and there ya go. I would rather start my day with something real instead of food that comes out of a box. My husband is able to have 2 slices of SaraLee bread with lots of sweet cream unsalted bu Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

Where Sugar Lurks

Where Sugar Lurks

Mention the word “sugar” to someone who has diabetes, and chances are he’ll tell you that he either avoids it like the plague or at least makes some effort to limit his intake. Years ago, nutrition recommendations for people with diabetes were essentially to avoid sugar as much as possible, based on the thinking that sugar would send blood glucose levels through the roof. Well, that notion was pretty much disproven, thanks to research that showed that sugar doesn’t act a whole lot differently than many other types of carbohydrate foods (like bread) when it comes to blood glucose control. The consensus became that it’s more the amount of carbohydrate than the type of carbohydrate that has the most impact on blood glucose. And with that, guidelines were changed, guardedly stating that sugar, in moderation, could be part of a diabetes eating plan provided that it was used in place of other carbohydrate foods. As a dietitian, I spent a lot of time talking to my patients about how to fit sugar or sugary foods into a meal plan and was often met with skepticism and doubt. “Me, eat sugar?” tended to be the response. I also encountered (and still do) people who mistakenly believe that eating something sweet “caused” them to get diabetes. Diabetes aside, we know that sugar isn’t exactly a paragon of nutrition. Most dietitians I know don’t advise their patients to eat more sugar. In fact, Americans, as a whole, tend to overdo it on the sugar: We tend to consume, on average, 22 teaspoons of sugar every day. That adds up to 350 calories. Much of the sugar that Americans take in comes from sugar-sweetened drinks, by the way. One teaspoon of sugar contains 4 grams of carbohydrate and 16 calories Downsides of sugar Sugar is sweet but its effects on health, well, n Continue reading >>

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Here, Dr. Suzanne Nelson explains how raisins can still be enjoyed by diabetics because they are a low glycemic index food—they don’t cause sharp spikes to blood glucose. RAISINS AND DIABETES Recently, while answering consumer-related health questions at a Sun-Maid exhibit booth, I was approached by a middle-aged woman. She said “I’m so disappointed, I love Sun-Maid raisins but I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and can’t eat them anymore because they’re high in sugar.” I quickly responded, ” I’ve got great news for you! Let me explain.” The reality is that including raisins in your diet is completely acceptable even when you’re trying to control your blood sugar levels. The key is to balance your intake of carbohydrates with fat and protein to prevent major blood glucose fluctuations. If you’re following a carbohydrate exchange meal plan to help control your diabetes, 2 tablespoons of raisins count as a single carbohydrate exchange, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. You can use one serving of raisins in place of any other carbohydrate source in a given meal, such as a 15-gram serving of grains, starch or dairy. Note: Always check food labels – unlike Sun-Maid, some manufacturers add sugar to raisins. Another important tool for diabetics to use is the glycemic index, which is a measure of how your blood sugar may respond to different foods. Certain types of foods have a low glycemic index, meaning that they do not cause sharp spikes in blood glucose levels. Raisins help contribute to blood glucose control because they have a relatively low glycemic index compared to other food and they also contain fiber and antioxidants. THE PROOF IS IN THE RAISIN PUDDING Researchers studied 4 Continue reading >>

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

I ate the skinny girl inside of me. I was hungry. You know, dieters like to eat their smoothy in the morning and be done with it. Or maybe that cereal with low fat milk. Great! Good for you! Diebetics are NOT Dieters. And if I have to post till I am blue in my face and call me Smurfette, I am going to get that through to you! Yes YOU. The Diabetic who thinks that if they just lose weight all will be well. That if they just have that small shake for breakfast like those commercials tell you to do..you will be a-ok and skinny in no time! You think your pancreas actually needs to lose weight? Well? Do ya'? Yes, nuts and whole grains like rolled oats are good for you in small portions but unfortunately not when they're tossed with loads of sugar and dried fruit ... 1 cup of lowfat granola with raisins (98g carbs) with 1/2 cup of fat free milk (6g carbs) Yogurt is undeniably a healthy food, but you have to choose the unsweetened, full-fat variety to get the benefits and keep carbs low. And toast and English muffins, even if you opt for whole grain, are high in carbs, so it's always best to eat just half or skip entirely. 1 cup of fat free, fruit flavored yogurt (47g carbs) with 1 whole wheat English muffin (27g) and 1 tbsp fruit preserves (14g) Picture this: A beautiful person sitting in a trendy coffee shop, eating a delicious-looking, oversized, low fat bran muffin and a skim latte, munching on just a little plate of no-fat red grapes. Now, check out the nutrition facts below, and picture that person's blood sugar two hours later! On the surface, a smoothie could be a good thing. Put some fruit and yogurt together and blend it up -- what could be so wrong with that? And there are some relatively good, lower carb smoothie recipes out there, but the vast majority contain hu Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

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