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Is Putting On Weight A Sign Of Diabetes?

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Signs Your Weight Gain Means Your Health Is In Trouble | Reader's Digest

Signs Your Weight Gain Means Your Health Is In Trouble | Reader's Digest

15 Signs Your Weight Gain Means Your Health Is in Trouble Weight gain doesnt just limit your wardrobe and dash your self-esteemit can be a symptom of some serious health conditions. Heres what to watch for. All weight is not created equaland if you have belly fat or a spare tire, it could be a marker for cardiovascular problems. Research from the American College of Cardiology found that the more abdominal weight, the greater the risk of heart disease. Fat cells in the abdomen are associated with worsening insulin resistance, which in turn is associated with high blood pressure, higher cholesterol, and higher risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, says UPMC endocrinologist and internist Jason Ng, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. All of these risk factors increase the risk of heart disease. Try these home remedies to help you lose belly fat . This is how much soda it takes to increase your risk of type 2 diabetesits less than you think. Some research suggests sugar intake itself actually triggers diabetesbut eating too many sweets definitely causes weight gain, a major risk factor for the disease. Approximately 90 percent of type 2 diabetes patients are overweight or obese, says Mohammad Kawji, MD, CCD, doctor of endocrinology and metabolism disorders at Spectrum Health. Weight gain is associated with metabolic changes, mainly insulin resistance, which increases the risk to develop diabetes in the future. As the pancreas has to secrete more insulin to balance blood sugar, it eventually fails, blood sugar rises, and diabetes develops. A simple blood test can test your blood sugar to see if its elevated. Unfortunately, Dr. Ng says that diabetes medications can also cause weight gain as they allow the body to absorb more sugar. For Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

5 Strange Symptoms That Could Be Early Signs Of Diabetes

Besides the well-known symptoms—like constant thirst and a frequent need to pee—here are a few other subtle signals that something may be wrong. Many people who develop type 2 diabetes have no idea they’re sick until a blood test shows abnormal blood sugar levels, or until their disease progresses and serious complications start to occur. “For the most part, diabetes is silent and insidious,” says Ronald Tamler, MD, director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute. “Most of the time people have no symptoms early on.” In some cases, though, there are sneaky signs. Some early diabetes symptoms are well-known: constant thirst, excessive urination, or sudden weight gain or loss, for example. Others, like the ones below, are more easily missed—by medical professionals and patients alike. If you’re experiencing any of these, be sure to bring them up with your doctor. Inflamed or infected gums Periodontitis—also known as gum disease—may be an early sign of type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. The study found that people with gum disease, especially those with severe cases, had higher rates of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) and pre-diabetes than those without. The connection between gum disease and diabetes isn’t new, says Dr. Tamler, and it appears to go both ways: Having either condition seems to increase the risk of developing the other. “Inflammation caused by gum disease eggs on the same factors that are responsible for high blood sugar that cause diabetes,” he says. Skin discoloration “Long before you actually get diabetes, you may notice a dark discoloration on the back of your neck,” says Dr. Tamler. This is called acanthosis nigricans, and it’s usually Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Is Controlled But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

My Diabetes Is Controlled But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

Exercise, eat right, and stay at a healthy weight. These goals are at the core of every type 2 diabetes treatment plan. And, for some people, that’s enough. When it’s not, insulin therapy is one treatment option that can help patients, but one possible side effect is weight gain. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy This can become a cycle for patients who need to control both diabetes and their weight. It’s frustrating when you feel the treatment is part of the problem. With diabetes, however, you have to get the blood sugar under control first. Insulin is used because it works. The cost of insulin can vary, but lower-cost insulin is associated with more weight gain. In a way, weight gain is a sign that the insulin is working — your body is more effectively utilizing sugar, fat and protein. Your body also has the ability to store them, which means if you don’t adjust your food intake, more of those calories turn to fat. Also, insulin is not necessarily the only factor. When you’re managing your diabetes, your body has a better chance to rehydrate, which also can cause weight gain. Of course, dehydration is a greater risk if you have diabetes, with frequent urination and thirst as two common signs of the condition. Drugs you take for other conditions also sometimes cause weight gain. So, what are your options if weight gain and insulin are an issue? Try these three tips: The simplest answer is to adjust your diet and exercise . Talk to your doctor and to a nutrition specialist about a food plan that takes the insulin effects into account. Work a bit more activity or exercise into each day. Don’t self- Continue reading >>

Nine Medical Reasons For Putting On Weight

Nine Medical Reasons For Putting On Weight

Nine medical reasons for putting on weight Nine medical reasons for putting on weight Most people put on weight because they eat and drink more calories than they burn through everyday movement and body functions. But in some cases, your weight gain may be due to an underlying health condition.Here are nine medicalissues that can cause weight gain. An underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) means your thyroid gland is not producing enough thyroid hormones, which play a central role in regulating your metabolism. Although an underactive thyroid can occur at any age and in either sex, it is most common in older women. "Without enough thyroid hormone, the body's metabolism slows down, which can lead to weight gain," says dietitian Catherine Collins. The condition is usually treated with daily hormone-replacement tablets, called levothyroxine. What are the symptoms of an underactive thyroid? Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin to manage their diabetes. Insulin helps to control your blood sugar level.Some people with longstanding diabetestend to eatmore than they need topreventlow blood sugar, also known as a "hypo" or hypoglycaemia . "Excessive snacking to prevent a hypo contributes to an excessive calorie intake and overall weight gain," says Collins, who recommends becoming an "expert patient" by attending a diabetes education course such as DESMOND for people with type 2 diabetes or DAFNE for type 1 diabetes, to help make your diabetes fit your lifestyle not the other way round. People begin to lose modest amounts of muscleas they get older, largely because they become less active. Muscles are an efficient calorie burner, so a loss of muscle mass can mean you burn fewer calories. If you're eating and drinking the same amount as you always have a Continue reading >>

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a diagnosis of risk for diabetes, which is a metabolism disorder in which the body cannot regulate insulin. This results in unhealthy levels of glucose in the blood. If a person has prediabetes, their blood glucose levels are high, but not considered high enough to merit a diabetes diagnosis. A prediabetes diagnosis should be taken seriously, as it is advanced warning of a preventable serious disease. Unless diet and lifestyle changes are made, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports that some people may not show any signs of prediabetes other than a higher than normal blood glucose level. However, these five signs have been associated with a prediabetes diagnoses and may merit the advice of a physician: Urgent: Discover Your Risk for Heart Disease, Take the Test Now! 1. Increased thirst and urination: When insulin levels are not being regulated, the kidneys have to work overtime to remove glucose from the bloodstream. This causes increased urination, which then causes dehydration and excessive thirst. 2. Weight gain: A common sign of prediabetes is unexplained weight gain even when eating habits have remained the same. In addition, increased exercise may have no effect on weight loss. Insulin is the hormone that is released by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar, which is converted into energy. If the body has become insulin resistant, blood sugar cannot be used as energy and is converted to fat by the liver instead. 3. Unexplained fatigue: Fatigue that is not due to a lack of sleep, poor nutrition, excessive stress, or other illnesses may be a sign of prediabetes. According to Natural Health Advisory, "The experience of fatigue and other low blood sugar symptoms 2-4 hours after a high-carb meal may be a w Continue reading >>

Can’t Lose Weight? Here Are Four Reasons Why…

Can’t Lose Weight? Here Are Four Reasons Why…

Spring is here and many of you are probably looking forward to wearing shorts, bathing suits, and flip-flops. And it’s often this time of year when people somewhat guiltily reflect back on their eating habits over the winter. Did you gain a few pounds? Are your spring pants or skirts feeling a little tight around the waistband? It’s actually normal to put weight on over the winter. After all, you may not have been as active as you usually are, and maybe you opted for those comfort foods over lower-calorie fare, like salads. But the time is here to shed that winter weight. It’s not always easy. And sometimes people find that despite eating fewer calories, cutting out the snacks, and stepping up the exercise, the weight is stubbornly refusing to come off — or it’s taking its own sweet time. This week, I’d like to point out some reasons why it might be harder for you to lose weight (or, why you’re gaining weight). Now, most weight gain occurs because of an imbalance between food intake and physical activity (that is to say, calories in exceed calories out). But if you’ve been struggling to drop those pounds, you might consider these possible causes: Hypothyroidism. It seems all too easy to blame your weight gain on “hormones” that are out of whack. But, as I wrote back in January, thyroid disorders are more common in people with diabetes, especially among people with Type 1 diabetes. Hypothyroidism, or too having too little thyroid hormone, can not only make you feel sluggish and tired, it can cause you to gain weight (or at least, make it hard to lose weight). Have your thyroid hormone (TSH and T4) levels checked every year. If you take thyroid medicine, take it as directed and work with your health-care provider to get your dose regulated, if needed. Continue reading >>

20 Diabetes Symptoms You Can't Afford To Ignore

20 Diabetes Symptoms You Can't Afford To Ignore

Slide 1 of 21: Stay healthy by keeping a close eye on these possible signs of diabetes. Whether triggered by genetics or lifestyle, diabetes rates are skyrocketing around the world, with more than 29 million people living with the disease in the United States alone. What’s even scarier than those numbers is how many people don’t know they have it.While many people imagine that diabetes is a disease that boldly announces itself, that’s far from the case. In fact, symptoms can be so mild, or even mimic other diseases to the point that those who actually have the disease don’t know it for years. However, even if your diabetes symptoms aren’t troubling you, that doesn’t mean they’re not taking their toll on your body. Uncontrolled diabetes can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, blindness, and can increase your chances of requiring amputations. Fortunately, you can lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by adding the 20 Foods That Fight Diabetes to your menu and improve your chances of finding the disease while it’s still manageable by discovering the 20 Diabetes Symptoms You Can't Afford to Ignore! Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

Weight Gain: Symptoms & Signs

Weight Gain: Symptoms & Signs

Weight gain can result from an increase in body fluid, muscle mass, or fat. An increase in body fluid can come from medications, fluid and salt retention, intravenous fluid infusion, kidney or heart failure. An increase in muscle mass is commonly seen with exercising. An increase in body fat is commonly seen as a result of diet or lack of exercise as the body converts muscle to fat. An excessive weight gain is referred to as obesity. Obesity is a function of environmental (diet, exercise, lifestyle, etc.), hormonal, and inherited (genetic) factors in varying degrees. Weight gain is a normal part of pregnancy. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes

Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin , which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it into the body's cells. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of unused sugar through urine (pee). This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases a person's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 di Continue reading >>

How Can Weight Loss Be An Important Sign Of Diabetes?

How Can Weight Loss Be An Important Sign Of Diabetes?

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE Leave a Comment Most often, we think of weight loss as a good thing. It can help prevent diabetes, arthritis, cancer and many more medical issues. However, when weight is lost rapidly, its not a healthy thing and can be a sign of something more troubling. Some cardiac diets do recommend rapid weight loss under medical supervision, and bariatric surgery also tends to cause rapid weight loss. In these cases, under medical supervision and with appropriate diet, vitamins and minerals, people can become healthier. Other than these situations and a few others, rapid weight loss is not recommended. If youre not trying to lose weight, then losing those pounds at too rapid a rate could mean diabetes or another medical condition. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. Weight loss that you didnt try to achieve can be a sign of many things. If you are eating the same way as you have always been and you are not performing any extra activities, your weight should then remain steady.Your body weight is affected by many things: how many calories you consume, your level of health and your age can all be factors. Once youve reached middle age or have made it through menopause, you should keep a steady weight unless you are overeating and being inactive. You may still gain a few pounds here and there, and even lose a few pounds along the way. At holidays, people can gain up to ten pounds if theyre not careful. Its when you lose weight for no apparent reason that you may need to look for an underlying cause of why you are dropping weight so fast. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Weight Gain | Symptom No 4 Of 10 Type 2 Early Symptom Diabetes

Diabetes Weight Gain | Symptom No 4 Of 10 Type 2 Early Symptom Diabetes

Diabetes Weight Gain – Gaining Weight And Obesity Diabetes weight gain is often a silent first type 2 early symptom diabetes but overweight has become so common that people don’t think of it as a diabetes symptom. The United States has defined a new meaning for the term “super-sized”. A whopping 74% of adults in America are either overweight or obese, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control. Overweight and obesity are defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that present a risk to health. A measure of obesity is the body mass index (BMI), using a person’s weight and height to determine a numerical score. A person with a BMI of 30 or more is generally considered obese. A person with a BMI equal to or more than 25 is considered overweight. Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980, according to the World Health Organization. Once considered a problem only in high-income countries, overweight and obesity are now dramatically on the rise around the world in low- and middle-income countries. Diabetes weight gain is more serious than worrying about a little “muffin top” when you zip your jeans. Obesity, overweight and excessive hunger (increases diabetes weight gain) are type 2 diabetes symptoms and pose a major risk for serious diet-related chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke, and certain forms of cancer. The health consequences range from increased risk of premature death, to serious chronic conditions that reduce the overall quality of life. Next to diabetes weight gain, other serious signs of type 2 diabetes symptoms include blurry vision, slow healing sores, tingling in hands and feet or recurring infections. What Does Diabetes Weight Gain Lead To? Overweight and obesit Continue reading >>

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