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Is Protein Powder Good For Diabetics

Whey Protein Found To Reduce Blood Glucose In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Whey Protein Found To Reduce Blood Glucose In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

(NaturalHealth365) Type 2 diabetes is on the rise worldwide and has surged in the United States, with an estimated 9.3 percent of the nation’s population suffering from the disease. While blood glucose can be controlled through a healthy diet, exercise and weight management, many of those suffering from diabetes will instead turn to pharmaceuticals rather than make the necessary lifestyle changes. But recent findings from an Israeli study show yet another way of helping to manage type 2 diabetes through dietary changes rather than with the use of risky drugs. By starting the day off with a healthy breakfast that includes whey protein, adults with type 2 diabetes were able to lose weight and stabilize blood sugar safely and effectively. Whey protein reduced blood glucose, led to weight loss A 23-month study out of Tel Aviv University involved 48 overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Each study subject ate the same number of calories over breakfast, lunch and dinner. Participants were assigned to one of three breakfast diets: a breakfast made up primarily of whey protein; a breakfast containing eggs, soy or tuna; or a breakfast high in carbs. Both groups assigned to the two high-protein breakfasts consumed 49 grams of protein at breakfast, while those assigned to the high-carbohydrate breakfast ingested 17 grams. Researchers found that patients in the whey protein breakfast group had greater weight loss at 12 weeks into the study than those in either the other protein group or the carbohydrate group. Those consuming whey protein also reported feeling satisfied and less hungry. The research results were published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. Average plasma glucose levels were reduced, as was the incidence of glucose spikes. Researchers also con Continue reading >>

Protein Shake/supplement For Muscle Building

Protein Shake/supplement For Muscle Building

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Protein Shake/Supplement for Muscle Building I am looking for a good muscle building supplement to go along with my training. I eat reasonably healthy but to build larger muscle and put on the weight I need more than I can consume in normal food. Most of the whey powders have so much sugar or carb content in them that hits the system to hard for my liking. Are their any type one diabetics that are weight/power lifter/rugby players that can offer some advice on useful supplements for muscle assisted growth, or re energizing fatigued muscles or even joint flexibility supplements. I already use glucosamine and auto immune supplements what else is useful to aid my training. Re: Protein Shake/Supplement for Muscle Building. PM onemanunit if he is still around.He is a body builder I think. Re: Protein Shake/Supplement for Muscle Building. I have been using a protein/creatine mix called Hurricane XS. It has slower digesting carbs and doesn't affect my blood sugar levels too badly. PM me and I'll give you the link to the site I buy it from - I realise I'm not supposed to use the forum for advertising as such. Re: Protein Shake/Supplement for Muscle Building. The soya protein isolate powder that I use for bread making is 1% carb and I get it from Holland and Barrett. Re: Protein Shake/Supplement for Muscle Building. Re: Protein Shake/Supplement for Muscle Building. Kash - do you have a dietitian who can assess your diet. I am a sports dietitian and often find that people are taking more protein than they think. There is little evidence that going over 2g/kg will build more muscle. Taking a protein shake after training is prob the best time - look at maximuscle Continue reading >>

Which Protein Powder Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Protein Powder Is Best For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a horrible disease that is based on too much or too little glucose in the blood. Too high or too low and serious trouble is knocking at the door. It’s killed millions, make many more blind or loss of organs due to the damage from high blood sugar. Many within the medical profession state openly that blood sugar is not the problem, it’s just the symptom. The root of the issue is insulin resistance and it’s the #1 reason people gain or lose weight. Even the meds given for type II diabetes states on the insert that it causes weight gain. This means your goal as a diabetic is to never spike your insulin levels if possible. Enter the low carb diet. There have been many thousands of people who’ve reversed their diabetes by staying on an extremely strict low or no carb diet. This is where protein powder comes in. For the diabetic, having something that is both low carb (5 grams or less per serving) and low calorie is the holy grail of controlling and even reversing diabetes according to many experts. Protein powder may not be the crown of low carb, but it’s right up there sitting at the round table with other nobles. The good news is that most protein powders are low carb and sugars, and most of them can and will help you manage your diabetes if you are busy, on the go and don’t always have time for a full meal. How do you know how much to take? It’s simple. Using protein shakes as a meal replacement or pick me up is something you can do daily, just use common sense. You can also use it as a supplement in your baking and cooking to take a meal that is low in protein to one with much more appealing numbers. They even have special protein powders for women that are low carb, but are easier on the stomach and come from a variety of sources, both plant an Continue reading >>

Recommended Protein Shakes For Diabetics

Recommended Protein Shakes For Diabetics

Whether you're looking for something to aid in your weight-loss efforts or trying to find a meal replacement for those days you're too busy to eat a decent meal, a protein shake may work. When you have diabetes, you need to find a protein shake that fits your diet plan and doesn't cause your blood sugar to spike. These shakes do not provide all the nutrients your body needs and should not be your only source of nutrition. Consult your doctor or dietitian to discuss protein shake options that fit your lifestyle. Video of the Day Some protein shakes specifically designed for people with diabetes contain fiber and resistant starch, a starch naturally found in foods such as beans that your body cannot digest. The fiber and resistant starch -- usually maltodextrin in the ingredient list -- in the shakes aid in blood sugar control. Protein, carb and calorie content in these shakes vary depending on brand, ranging from 10 to 16 grams of protein, 6 to 27 grams of carbs and 180 to 200 calories. Shakes with Cornstarch Like fiber and resistant starch, uncooked cornstarch also aids in blood sugar control and is an ingredient in some protein shakes for people with diabetes. Uncooked cornstarch is a slow-digesting carb that causes a more gradual rise in blood sugar. When mixed with water, one protein shake mix that contains uncooked cornstarch provides 15 grams of protein, 12 grams of carbs and 110 calories. You can also make your own protein shake using whole foods. For example, you can blend a small banana, 1/2 cup of whole strawberries, 1/2 cup of soft tofu, 1 cup of nonfat milk and ice. This shake contains 15 grams of protein, 35 grams of carbs and 255 calories. Adding a little fat to your shake, such as peanut butter or flaxseeds, may help slow the digestion of your shake and he Continue reading >>

Whey Protein Powder Helps Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetics

Whey Protein Powder Helps Blood Sugar In Type 2 Diabetics

New research has shown that whey protein concentrate can help to reduce post-meal spikes in blood sugar in type 2 diabetics. High blood sugar is dangerous; it can cause damage to nearly any part of the body. Blood sugar is highest after meals. Studies have shown that whey protein helps to blunt the usual rise in blood sugar, which should help to reduce the side effects and complications of diabetes. This research was conducted at Tel Aviv University and published in the journal Diabetologia. According to Professor Daniela Jakubowicz, Dr. Julio Wainstein and Professor Bo Ahrén, the consumption of whey protein before meals might even reduce a diabetic’s requirement for insulin. This is good news because insulin has a tendency to promote weight gain around the abdomen and can make it impossible for diabetics to lose weight. Prof. Jakubowicz goes on to say “What’s remarkable is that consuming whey protein before meals reduces the blood sugar spikes seen after meals. It also improves the body’s insulin response, putting it in the same range or even higher than that produced by novel anti-diabetic drugs”. Synd-X Slimming Protein Powder is made of whey protein concentrate and is a delicious, convenient and healthy way for diabetics to achieve better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Best Whey Protein Powder For Diabetics

Best Whey Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whey protein has a ton of health benefits, even though most people immediately associate it with the health and fitness realm. And, within that application, there’s a good reason for its popularity: Whey protein has been shown to encourage an overall healthy body composition – meaning it helps to builds lean muscle and reduce fat. The popular powder, though, has plenty of other uses. For one thing, whey can be extremely useful to diabetics. How? Is there a particular type of whey protein they should look for? The Benefits of Whey Protein for Diabetics The first thing to consider when discussing whey protein and diabetes is the fact that whey is a high protein food. This also means that it is naturally low in carbohydrates. Considered together, these nutritional facts mean that whey has a very low glycemic index (meaning that it will have little effect on insulin levels) and will still be a filling food. In general, this places whey within the bounds of the type of foods usually recommended for diabetics. But, recent research has found yet another reason for diabetics to use whey: the powder can actually reduce the severity of an insulin response even after a meal that would normal cause a massive spike. In the study, 15 subjects with type 2 diabetes took 50 grams of whey 30 minutes before eating a high glycemic index meal and had their blood tested periodically before and after the meal. The team of researchers found that, after drinking whey, the insulin response was reduced by 28 percent. Clearly, whey could (and should) have a place in a healthy eating plan to control diabetes. Other Considerations for Whey Protein Powders & Diabetes Unfortunately, not all whey protein powders are the same. Many have been loaded with other ingredients – including sweeteners. As Continue reading >>

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A large breakfast that includes whey protein may help control Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. Approximately 29 million people in the United States have Type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are living with prediabetes. Previous research has indicated that a large, high-protein breakfast, medium-sized lunch, and small dinner can help manage blood sugar levels and weight in people with Type 2 diabetes. To evaluate whether eating whey protein (a milk byproduct created during cheese production) at breakfast is more effective than eating other proteins for controlling blood sugar, HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months), weight, and hunger, the researchers recruited 48 overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes. The participants, who had an average age of 59, were randomly assigned to one of three diets containing the same amount of calories for 23 months. The only differences between the diets were in the amount and and type of proteins included at breakfast: The first group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of 80% whey protein concentrate, such as whey-based shakes; the second group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of non-whey proteins such as eggs, tuna, and soy; and the third group ate high-carb breakfasts with on 17 grams of protein. After 12 weeks, the whey protein group had lost an average of 16.7 pounds, compared to 13.4 pounds for those eating other proteins and 6.8 pounds for those eating primarily carbohydrate. Participants eating whey protein also felt less hungry throughout the day, had lower post-meal blood sugar spikes, and had larger decreases in HbA1c compared to those on the other two diets. “Recent reports have shown that whey protein Continue reading >>

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

1 / 6 Learn All About the Best Weight Loss Shakes for Diabetes Diabetes is an increasingly common condition that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. There are several types of diabetes, but type 2 diabetes is the most common form. Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight or obese and must be medically managed to prevent serious diabetes complications. Along with making lifestyle changes and taking medication, people with diabetes must keep a watchful eye on their blood glucose levels and the foods they eat throughout each day. Whether you’re watching your weight or looking for a quick diabetes-friendly meal on the go, a meal replacement shake may be a good — or not so good — option for those with diabetes. Of course, a healthy diet of whole foods is always best, but shakes can provide a nice “safety net” for when a healthy meal is not an option. While meal replacement shakes may fill you up, even the best weight loss shakes don’t provide complete dietary nutrition. If you rely on weight loss or meal replacement shakes regularly, you will still need a healthy balance of real food each day, including: Fat-free or low-fat dairy Fresh fruits and vegetables, especially nonstarchy vegetables Lean protein Legumes, like beans and peas Nuts Seafood Soy Whole grains Also, not all meal replacement shakes are created equal; even the best weight loss shakes designed for people with diabetes may fall short when it comes to complete nutrition. For example, the Glucerna Rich Chocolate Shake is gluten-free and great for people who are lactose intolerant. But the Glucerna Shake is only enough to replace a moderate snack or part of a meal — not an entire meal. You will need to read the label and find out what’s missing when it comes to fat, pro Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

WHAT YOU’RE ABOUT TO GET INTO? KEY POINTS Whey protein is the least important thing you need to worry about when it comes to building a better looking body. Certain types of whey protein are overpriced and aren’t worth the money. Whey protein will not ruin your kidneys or liver. Whey protein can affect your blood glucose levels and needs to be accounted for with the appropriate level of medication. Does whey protein live up to the hype for people with diabetes? Can I take whey protein safely if I have Diabetes? What about my kidneys? Am I wasting my money on another marketing scam? My health care professional says I do not need protein supplements, do they really know, or are they playing it safe? All my gym buddies take whey and getting results, but they don’t have diabetes, will it work for me? These are questions I hear all the time in my clinical Diabetes practice. Mainly by young men and women who are starting at the gym and want to build a great physique. They want to maximise their gym efforts by supplementing with whey protein. But they are concerned with safety, effect on blood glucose, and their finances. Sound familiar? There are some amazing articles online that have every last detail on whey protein. But I am guessing you do not want every last detail, right? If you want the most potent information, in an easy to understand format, that is specific to diabetes? This article is perfect for you. Not only that, it details the best practical strategies, taken straight from the pioneering Diabetic Muscle and Fitness Training Lab . These strategies are guaranteed to put you in control of your blood glucose level, and get the most out of whey protein. Oh, one more thing, I guess you want a diabetes specific guide for how to choose the right whey? Don’t wor Continue reading >>

Best Whey Protein For Diabetics

Best Whey Protein For Diabetics

Diabetes is a complex condition that can impact many facets of life. Type II Diabetes in particular, however, is powerfully influenced by a person’s diet. In an effort to control their diabetes, then, it’s natural that people would be concerned about all of their food choices. And the same goes for whey protein. So, what is the best whey protein for diabetics? Benefits of Whey for Diabetics First, though, are there any special reasons why diabetics should take whey protein? It’s notable that they two most common goals that people have in taking whey – increased muscle mass and reduced body fat – can both help to decrease the symptoms of Type II Diabetes. In fact, a 2013 study in the journal Diabetes Care reported that body composition is the biggest factor in determining risk of developing the condition. In large part, this is because Type II Diabetes is a state of insulin resistance; Your body is no longer listening to the signals sent by that particular hormone. As a result, sugar does not get absorbed by your cells, leaving your blood sugar levels high. Muscle, however, is incredibly sensitive to insulin – and generally hungry for glucose. It stands to reason, then, that they more muscle mass you have, the more sensitive you will be to insulin. And, as mentioned, whey protein provides your body with everything it needs to make those helpful changes in body composition. Adding to the reasons that diabetics should be taking whey, is a 2014 study that looked particularly at the effects of taking the protein before breakfast in the morning. Not only did whey reduce the blood sugar spike caused by the meal, but it also increased insulin levels. Most surprisingly, this boost in insulin was equal to – or higher than – that created by anti-diabetic medication Continue reading >>

Tips To Choosing A Sugar Free Protein Powder That’s Diabetes Friendly

Tips To Choosing A Sugar Free Protein Powder That’s Diabetes Friendly

If you're wondering if protein powder fits into a diabetic diet, the answer is yes. Protein powder makes a great addition to baked goods such as cakes. It also makes a great addition to shakes, can be taken as a meal replacement, and even consumed as a liquid snack. But like most foods, all protein powders aren't created equal. Some are poor quality and won't provide health benefits, while others with high quality ingredients can help with weight loss and making foods taste great. And when you're looking for sugar free options, which are a must with diabetes, there are a few extra things to be aware of. Ingredients It goes without saying that whenever you buy a food that is packaged – always read the label! If a product has an ingredient list as long as your arm or contains many ingredients you can't pronounce or recognize, then it's not a good quality product. Make sure the protein powder you purchase doesn't contain any more that 7-10 ingredients, even less is better. Sugar/ sweeteners Be sure to check what type of sugar or sweeteners the product uses. Steer clear of products that contain sugar and fructose. And be aware that many protein powders contain artificial sweeteners such as aspartame and these are not good for diabetics to eat, or anyone for that matter. We recommend monk fruit or stevia based protein powders, or second to that, erythritol or xylitol. Proprietary blends When a supplement company claims their product is a “proprietary blend” that offers benefits above and beyond other products, don't believe it. Often they won't list the ingredients of their “proprietary blend” on the label, which means you really have no idea what's in the product. Also, when they make claims that certain ingredients are included in their “proprietary blend,” o Continue reading >>

Finding The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics: Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

Finding The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics: Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

Protein supplements are far and wide the most popular and best-selling supplements on the market. After all, if you’re not getting enough protein, your muscles won’t be growing anytime soon. However, when dealing with diabetes, you need to be attentive to what you eat. Carbohydrates, including sugars, are the largest factor in your diet. The best way to control your diabetes, but still make some great progress in terms of body composition and muscle gain, is to supplement with a protein powder with as few carbohydrates as possible. With low-carb protein supplements, you can double scoop without worrying too much about insulin levels. For those who don’t know me, I am an absolute nut when it comes to strict nutrition, and I recently studied the relationship between protein supplements and diabetes in order to find the best protein powder for diabetics. After researching and comparing over 100 different protein powders, I found the following five supplements to be the all-around best options for diabetic-friendly proteins. Protein 26g 25g 18g 30g 24g Carbs 0g 2.5g 1.5g 2g 1g Fat 0g 0.5g 1g 1g 2g Sugar 0g 2g 1g 0.5g 0g Taste Rating 9.4/10 9.0/10 8.9/10 9.4/10 8.1/10 Other Unflavored so can be mixed with anything Several flavors available Contains good amount of L-glutamine Contains 4 good sources of protein Non-GMO peas used to create this protein Cost Per Serving $0.86 $0.76 $0.72 $1.55 $0.62 8 Choosing The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics Not only is Isopure the top pick for the best protein powder for diabetics, it’s one of the best protein supplements on the market PERIOD. With 0g fat, 0g carbohydrates and 26g of protein per serving, Nature’s Best Isopure Whey Protein Isolate is definitely the cleanest protein out there. In addition to being squeaky clean, t Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

Protein Supplements: Whey

Protein Supplements: Whey

The goal of last week’s protein post was to “refresh” your memory about protein: what it does, where it’s found, and how much you need. That being said, the subject of protein is hot enough to fuel debates regarding who needs more and what’s the best way to get it. As I mentioned last week, there are some people who do need more protein, namely endurance athletes, people who are ill or malnourished, and older adults. Most of us, though, don’t need a whole lot more protein than what’s recommended to stay healthy. And we already know that since we don’t need all that much, we tend to get more than enough from our daily food intake. However, if, for whatever reason, you don’t think you’re getting enough protein and/or you don’t happen to care for the usual protein food sources (meat, poultry, fish, eggs), then it’s possible that you could benefit from a supplement. And here’s the tricky part, because trying to choose a protein supplement is about as daunting as deciding what flavor ice cream to order is for a child. There are so many choices and so many forms of supplements. This week, we’ll look at one of the most popular supplements: whey. Whey Protein What it is: “Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet, eating her curds and whey…” Do you remember that nursery rhyme? The whey that Miss Muffet was enjoying at the time is the same whey that’s commonly found in today’s protein drinks and powders. Whey is one of the two main proteins found in milk and it makes up about 20% of milk protein (casein makes up the other 80%). Drilling down a little more, there are three types of whey protein: whey isolate, whey concentrate, and hydrolysate whey protein. Each type of whey protein contains different amounts of fat, cholesterol, lactose, and bioacti Continue reading >>

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