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Is Protein Bad For A Diabetic?

High-protein Diets May Not Help Those With Diabetes

High-protein Diets May Not Help Those With Diabetes

For those who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the advice is consistent: lose weight. That makes the results of a study that came out earlier this week in the journal Cell Reports pretty startling. According to the authors, weight loss from a high-protein diet does not improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin (a key factor in staving off diabetes) the way a conventional diet does. In fact, high-protein dieters in the study saw no improvement in insulin sensitivity at all, while the conventional dieters improved by as much as 30 percent. Usually, “weight loss has a tremendous benefit,” Dr. Bettina Mittendorfer, a professor at Washington University School of Medicine, and senior author of the paper, told Healthline. “With just a little bit of extra protein you’ve gotten rid of one of the major benefits of weight loss.” Read more: The lowdown on high-protein diets » The study’s focus The study focused on postmenopausal women, who are often told to try high protein diets in order to reduce muscle loss. Women at that age are at a particularly high risk of sarcopenia, a condition in which muscle mass is lost over time. A review published earlier this year found that high-protein diets do indeed preserve muscle while shedding fat. But epidemiological studies have suggested a link between such diets and an increased risk of diabetes. So Mittendorfer’s team conducted a randomized controlled trial that singled out the effects of extra protein when all other factors remained the same. They divided a group of 34 women (27 completed the study) between the ages of 50 and 65 into three groups. One followed a calorie-restricted diet with the recommended daily protein allowance. Another cut calories but supplemented with whey protein shakes. And a control gro Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

Protein is an essential macronutrient (that means it's a large nutrient; the other two macronutrients are fat and carbohydrate) that your body needs to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function, and they help some additional physiological processes. Usually, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes, and there are times when less protein is better. Daily Protein Intake As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 - 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein, which is the same amount suggested for a regular balanced diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates, and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, fish and seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. For example: One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein One cup black beans has 15 grams protein An egg has 6 grams protein One cup low-fat milk has 8 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein High Protein Diets and Diabetes Switching to a high-protein diet may seem like it should make a difference in blood sugar regulation, but the protein probably doesn't help much at all, at least for the long term. According to an evidence review done by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, increasing protein intake doesn't appear to have any appreciable impact on how your sugar is digested or absorbed. And it doesn't have any long-term effects on your blood sugar or insulin requirements.​​ So if a person with diabetes switches to a high-protein diet, any therapeutic benefit is p Continue reading >>

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar

High Protein Foods Make People With Type 2 Diabetes Manage Blood Sugar Across the country, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes and another 86 million have prediabetes, forecasting a future of higher rates. But new research presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting may reverse that trend, as its found a protein-laden diet regimen may help type 2 diabetes patients improve their blood sugar levels. Over the course of six weeks, 37 participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were fed either a diet high in animal protein or plant protein. While the animal diet consisted of a combination of meat and dairy foods, the plant diet was bereft of any animal product, although both diets included the same number of calories. Researchers measured each participants blood sugar levels and liver fat before and after the experiment to see if there were any changes from the diet intervention. Both groups saw an improvement in their blood sugar (glucose) levels and liver fat, but only those who were part of the animal protein group experienced an improvement in insulin sensitivity. Insulin is a hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar levels and allowing glucose to enter the cells of the body for storage. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when insulin doesnt function properly and sugar accumulates in the blood, resulting in several problems ranging from high blood pressure to vision loss. Those who are insulin sensitive only need a small amount of insulin to keep their glucose within a normal range, while those who are insulin-resistant need more insulin to keep levels in check. While animal protein dieters experienced improved insulin sensitivity, participants who ate plant-based protein saw an improvement in their kidney function. Normall Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you’re probably wondering what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels in check. The good news is you don’t have to give up your favorite foods. A diabetes diet, like most healthy diets, is all about controlling portions and consuming a wide array of vegetables, fresh fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds, lean protein, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats. Watch Your Carb Intake When managing type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand that not all foods are created equal: Some will affect your blood sugar levels more than others. Carbohydrates, in particular, break down into glucose quickly, which spikes your blood sugar levels. Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables. “In general, carbohydrates should be limited to approximately 30 to 60 grams (g) per meal to prevent high blood glucose levels,” says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Franklin, New Jersey. Once you’ve learned to manage your carb portions, try balancing your meals with lean protein and healthy fats, which digest slowly and keep your blood sugar steady after meals. Use the Healthy Plate Method So what does a healthy diabetes diet look like? It’s simple, says Palinski-Wade. Just use the healthy plate method: Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables (like spinach, carrots, and other greens), a quarter of your plate with lean protein (such as grilled chicken, fish, lean beef, or pork), and a quarter of your plate with starchy foods (like whole grain bread, brown rice, or whole wheat pasta). Below is a sample meal plan to get you started. Breakfast Ideal Meal: ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese + 1 tbsp chopped walnuts + 1 cup fresh fruit salad Why it Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Protein And Diabetes

Protein And Diabetes

Tweet Protein is one of the three main energy providing macronutrients, along with carbohydrate and fat. It helps the body to grow new tissue, therefore helping to build muscle and repair damage to the body. Protein is also a constituent part of each cell of our bodies and makes up approximately a sixth of our body weight. Protein and blood glucose In addition to helping the body grow, protein can also be broken down by the body into glucose and used for energy (a process known as gluconeogenesis). Protein can be broken down into glucose by the body and the effects are more likely to be noticed if you are having meals with less carbohydrate. Protein is broken down into glucose less efficiently than carbohydrate and, as a result, any effects of protein on blood glucose levels tend to occur any where between a few hours and several hours after eating. People with type 1 diabetes, or type 2 diabetes on insulin, may need to bear the effects of protein in mind if having a largely protein based meal. It’s best to learn how your sugar levels react to such meals so that you can judge the right insulin requirements. How much protein should I be eating? The UK Food Standards Agency has a sliding scale for recommended protein intake, varying by age: 1 to 3 years: 15g 4 to 6 years: 20g 7 to 10 years: 28g 11 to 14 years: 42g 15 to 18 years: 55g 19 to 50 years: 55g Over 50 years: 53g Some diets, such as the Zone diet, advocate eating an amount of protein in proportion to your lean body mass (body weight minus body fat). Can protein be bad for you? A number of studies have found there to be correlations between intake of red meat and the development of type 2 diabetes and cancers (including lung cancer liver cancer and notably bowel cancer). The studies found that if people were con Continue reading >>

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A large breakfast that includes whey protein may help control Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. Approximately 29 million people in the United States have Type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are living with prediabetes. Previous research has indicated that a large, high-protein breakfast, medium-sized lunch, and small dinner can help manage blood sugar levels and weight in people with Type 2 diabetes. To evaluate whether eating whey protein (a milk byproduct created during cheese production) at breakfast is more effective than eating other proteins for controlling blood sugar, HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months), weight, and hunger, the researchers recruited 48 overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes. The participants, who had an average age of 59, were randomly assigned to one of three diets containing the same amount of calories for 23 months. The only differences between the diets were in the amount and and type of proteins included at breakfast: The first group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of 80% whey protein concentrate, such as whey-based shakes; the second group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of non-whey proteins such as eggs, tuna, and soy; and the third group ate high-carb breakfasts with on 17 grams of protein. After 12 weeks, the whey protein group had lost an average of 16.7 pounds, compared to 13.4 pounds for those eating other proteins and 6.8 pounds for those eating primarily carbohydrate. Participants eating whey protein also felt less hungry throughout the day, had lower post-meal blood sugar spikes, and had larger decreases in HbA1c compared to those on the other two diets. “Recent reports have shown that whey protein Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Understanding Protein

Understanding Protein

Excess protein can mean excess calories and fat. It's best to get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry, fish, low-fat dairy products, and tofu. Protein is an essential part of your diet — and your body. But too much of a good thing can be bad for you. Most meats have fat as well as protein. So excess protein from animal sources can mean excess calories and fat — which means a greater chance at gaining weight. Proteins are found in: Poultry Fish and shellfish Eggs Dairy products, like cottage cheese and regular cheese Plant-based proteins, like beans, nuts and tofu The best advice about protein? Get what you need from low-fat protein sources like lean meats, poultry and fish, low fat or nonfat dairy products, and vegetarian protein sources like tofu. How much protein do I need each day? For most people with diabetes, the amount of protein you need is the same as for people without diabetes. The National Institutes of Medicine recommend protein should typically provide 10-35% of total calories. The average intake for adults in the U.S. and Canada is about 15% of total calories. For most people, this amounts to 6 to 8 ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish daily. Think of a 3-ounce portion of protein as the size of a deck of playing cards. Aim for including roughly two of these in your diet daily. If you have kidney problems, you may need to limit how much protein you eat. Excess protein can make kidney damage worse. Your registered dietitian can help select the amount of protein that is right for you. Are All Proteins Created Equal? The source of protein is something else to consider – because some proteins are higher in calories and fats than others. Saturated fats and cholesterol are found in many protein-rich foods, contributing to bl Continue reading >>

A List Of Protein-rich Foods For A Diabetic

A List Of Protein-rich Foods For A Diabetic

A healthy, balanced diabetes diet includes protein. Choose healthy protein foods low in saturated fat and calories to help control your weight and reduce your risk for heart disease. You can include a variety of protein-rich foods in a nutritious diabetes meal plan, including protein from both animals and plants. Fish provides an excellent source of lean protein on a diabetes diet. The American Diabetes Association recommends you have between 6 ounces and 9 ounces of fish per week. Choose fish that contains heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, trout or herring. To keep your fish diabetes-friendly, bake or grill it -- avoid breading and frying. In terms of poultry, choose skinless chicken or turkey. If you like beef, select lean cuts, such as top sirloin steak, bottom round roast or steak, top round roast or steak, sirloin tip side steak and eye of round roast or steak. Calcium-rich dairy products provide a good source of protein. To reduce calories and saturated fat, choose reduced-fat milk and plain low-fat or nonfat yogurt. Include two servings of milk or dairy in your daily diabetes meal plan. A single serving of milk -- 1 cup -- or a single serving of yogurt -- three-quarters cup -- each contains about 8 grams of protein. Low-fat cheese makes another good source of protein on a diabetes diet. Beans provide one of the best sources of plant-based protein on a diabetes diet. A one-half cup of beans contains just as much protein as 1 ounce of meat but without the unhealthy saturated fat. Legumes, such as lentils, black-eyed peas, split peas and chickpeas, as well as foods made from chickpeas, such as hummus and falafel, provide healthy sources of lean protein. Other plant sources of healthy protein on a diabetes diet include unsweetened and unsalted nuts a Continue reading >>

Is Animal Or Plant Protein Better For People With Diabetes?

Is Animal Or Plant Protein Better For People With Diabetes?

A fascinating new study shows that diets high in animal and plant protein both show similar metabolic improvement and cardiovascular risk factors. Research has previously reported that while diets high in animal protein support body weight and blood sugars, they may also cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and plant protein-based diets are “metabolically advantageous and reduce cardiovascular events.” Researchers have conducted a study to compare high animal versus plant protein diets in people with type 2 diabetes in order to gain more clarity about which might be more beneficial. The researchers compared isocaloric diets that are comprised of 30 percent calories in the form of animal or plant protein. The rest of the diet involved 30 percent of calories coming from fat and 40 percent from carbohydrates. So over six weeks, 44 patients with type 2 diabetes were studied in a randomized parallel group study while insulin sensitivity was measured and cardiovascular parameters were determined. Which is Better? Uric acid decreased in both groups but much more so in the group eating animal protein. This is notable considering high levels of uric acid can lead to gout, kidney stones, and kidney failure. HbA1c and diastolic blood pressure improved much more in the group eating plant protein and not in the group eating animal protein. When it came to insulin sensitivity and C-reactive protein and fasting glucose, much improvement was seen in those eating animal protein but not in the plant protein group. In both groups, total and LDL (aka bad cholesterol) and systolic blood pressure decreased by a large degree. Also, in both groups, urinary albumin excretion rate decreased from baseline in microalbuminuric subjects. So…Animal or Plant Protein? There seemed to be m Continue reading >>

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

Protein shakes and smoothies are all the rage these days. These popular pre- and post-workout drinks can include almost any ingredient under the sun, so if you have diabetes, it’s natural to wonder how they’ll affect your blood sugar. That said, there’s no reason to shy away from these drinks. There are countless diabetes-friendly recipes available online. Here, we round up our top eight protein shake and smoothie recipes for people with diabetes. Protein drinks 101 In general, protein drinks are made from protein powder and a liquid. Depending on your dietary needs, this liquid may be: water dairy milk nut milk rice milk seed milk Other protein add-ins include: cottage cheese yogurt nut butters raw nuts Sweeteners, fresh or frozen fruit, and fresh vegetables may also be added. No one food is off-limits if you have diabetes. Still, it’s important to limit refined carbohydrates that are more likely to spike your blood sugar. Eating fat with carbohydrates may help slow digestion. This can slow down the length of time it takes sugar to hit your bloodstream. Sources of fat that taste great in protein drinks include: nut butters raw nuts hemp seeds flaxseeds chia seeds avocados If possible, add fiber to your protein drink. It helps slow your body’s absorption of sugar. Oatmeal, ground flaxseed, chia seeds, and wheat bran are high in fiber and are protein-drink friendly. Some protein drink recipes call for maple syrup or Stevia. Maple syrup is high in sugar, but can be enjoyed sparingly. Stevia is a non-nutritive, no-calorie sweetener that won’t raise your blood sugar. When making shakes and smoothies, use the least amount of sweetener possible. Many pre-made protein shakes and smoothies are loaded with refined sugar. Your best bet is to make them at home where yo Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

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