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Is Pre Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes The Same Thing?

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Pre-diabetes And Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Pre-diabetes And Diabetes?

What is the Difference Between Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes? What is the Difference Between Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes? What is the Difference Between Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes? A lot of us believe there is no difference. They are both diabetes just in different stages. Officially Pre D is above average fasting bgs of 100-125. 126 and above is full blown diabetes. If you have an OGTT any number over 200 is diabetes. But that can be misleading to many Pre D's who don't take action until bgs are very high and damage has started. There is some belief that any bgs after meals of 140+ may lead to damage. Are you testing after meals? 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Tweet Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which whilst treatable is currently not fully reversible. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. For this reason, prediabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels. In the UK, around 7 million people are estimated to have prediabetes and thus have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. [17] Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. The increasing number of new cases of prediabetes presents a global concern as it carries large scale implications towards the future burden on healthcare. Between 2003 and 2011, the prevalence of prediabetes in England alone more than tripled, with 35.3% of the adult population, or 1 in every 3 people having prediabetes. [106] Learn more about prediabetes Prediabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes, for it is at this point that lifestyle choices can be made to turn it around. Early, decisive action can slow down or even halt the development of type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of prediabetes? Many people have prediabetes but are completely unaware of it. This is because the condition often develops gradually without any warning signs or symptoms. In many cases, the sufferer only learns of their borderline diabetic sta Continue reading >>

About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes

About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes

Eighty-six million Americans now have prediabetes—that’s 1 out of 3 adults! Of those 86 million, 9 out of 10 of them don’t even know they have it. Without intervention, many people with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. With numbers like that, it’s important to learn about prediabetes and take action. Read the National Diabetes Statistics Report to learn more about the toll that diabetes is taking in the United States. Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

Prediabetes, or elevated blood sugar, puts you at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially if you are overweight, but you can take steps to prevent it. Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. More than 86 million American adults—approximately one-third of those over age 18 and half of those over 65—have prediabetes, and most of them don’t even know it. If you have prediabetes, it means your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes puts you at higher-than-normal risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control, up to 30% of overweight men and women with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years of diagnosis. You don’t have to be one of them! Here are five steps you can take to reduce your diabetes risk. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Should I Do If I Have It? Are you one of the estimated 54 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healthier lifestyle that includes weight loss and more physical activity. First, let's define what "pre-diabetes" is and is not. Diabetes is defined as having a fasting plasma blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two separate occasions. If diabetes symptoms exist and you have a casual blood glucose taken at any time that is equal to or greater than 200 mg/dl, and a second test shows the same high blood glucose level, then you have diabetes. In general, people who have a fasting plasma blood glucose in the 100-125 mg/dl range are defined as having impaired fasting glucose. If your doctor gives you an oral glucose tolerance test, and at two-hours your blood glucose is 140-199 mg/dl, you have "impaired glucose tolerance". Either of these is medical terminology for what your doctor is probably referring to when he says you have "pre-diabetes." Be sure to ask your doctor what your exact blood sugar test results are when he tells you that you have "pre-diabetes." Some physicians are not as familiar as they should be with the new national guidelines for diagnosing diabetes. They may be telling you that you have pre-diabetes, when in fact you have actual diabetes. Among those who should be screened for pre-diabetes include overweight adults age 45 and older and those u Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here’s Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here’s Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn’t change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of whic Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

This sneaky health condition has no symptoms. But it’s almost always present before you get type 2 diabetes. It means your blood sugar level is higher than normal, but not yet high enough for you to be diagnosed with the disease. About 86 million people in the U.S. over age 20 have prediabetes. And doctors see the need to diagnose it more often. Treating it can prevent more serious health problems later on. These range from type 2 diabetes to problems with your heart, blood vessels, eyes, and kidneys. By the time you’re diagnosed with diabetes, many of these problems have already taken hold. You’re most likely to get this disease if you: Had gestational diabetes or gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds Are African-American, Native American, Latino, or Pacific Islander Are overweight or obese, especially around the middle (belly fat) Have high cholesterol, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and a high LDL cholesterol Don't exercise Are older; people over age 45 are most likely to get it. You should get tested for prediabetes if you meet the criteria above and you: Had an abnormal blood sugar reading in the past Have heart disease Show signs of insulin resistance, which means your body produces insulin, but doesn't respond to it like it should Although most people with prediabetes have no symptoms, you might notice you're extra thirsty, pee a lot more, or have blurred vision or extreme fatigue. Your doctor can perform one of three different blood tests -- the fasting plasma glucose test, the oral glucose tolerance test, or the hemoglobin A1c test. The fasting plasma glucose test measures your blood sugar after an 8-hour fast. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal after the test, you may have prediabetes. The oral glucose tolerance test rec Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a state in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Prediabetes is also referred to as “impaired fasting glucose” or “impaired glucose tolerance,” depending on the blood test used to make the diagnosis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one of every three adults in the United States — or 79 million Americans age 20 or older — had prediabetes in 2010. And the majority of these people didn’t even know they had it. Risk Factors and Symptoms The risk factors for prediabetes are largely the same as those for type 2 diabetes: Obesity or overweight Sedentary lifestyle Previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) Age over 45 Family history of type 2 diabetes African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander racial or ethnic heritage Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One of the few possible signs is acanthosis nigricans, which is a darkening of the skin in places such as the neck, armpits, elbows, knees, and knuckles. If you notice such skin changes, it’s a good idea to get them checked out by a doctor. Diagnosing Prediabetes Prediabetes may be discovered by chance if you undergo a routine blood test (at any age) or routine screening for type 2 diabetes (at age 45). Or it may be discovered if you have risk factors for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and your doctor orders a screening test. The tests used to screen for prediabetes are the same as those used to screen for type 2 diabetes: the fasting plasma glucose test and the A1C test (also called the HbA1c test or the hemoglobin A1c test). A fasting plasma glucose test result between 100 and 125 mg/dl and an HbA1c test result betwee Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 2 Diabetes, Prediabetes And Impaired Glucose Tolerance?

What Is The Difference Between Type 2 Diabetes, Prediabetes And Impaired Glucose Tolerance?

What is the difference between Type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and impaired glucose tolerance? Type 2 diabetes is a disease that happens when the body is not able to make or use insulin properly. Insulin is needed to help carry glucose (sugar) from the blood stream to the bodys cells. With Type 2 diabetes, glucose stays in the blood causing high blood glucose (or blood sugar) levels. People with diabetes may need pills and/or insulin to manage their blood glucose levels. Prediabetes is when a persons blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is the same as impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Some people with prediabetes may need medications to help manage their blood glucose levels. Will I get diabetes if I have prediabetes? Maybe. If you have prediabetes, you are at a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and some of the complications of diabetes such as heart disease and stroke. If you take steps to manage your blood glucose by eating healthy and being physically active when you have prediabetes, you can delay or prevent Type 2 diabetes from developing. What should I do if I am diagnosed with prediabetes? Here are some tips to help manage prediabetes: Follow a healthy eating plan. Call an Eatright Ontario Registered Dietitian at 1-877-510-510-2 to get helpful information about healthy eating and prediabetes. Try out this 7-day Diabetes Menu Plan designed to prevent and manage diabetes. Try to be active for at least 2 hours per week. Thats about 30 minutes per day on five days of the week. You can start with 10 minutes at a time. If you are new to physical activity, speak to your health care provider before getting started.For more tips read Physical Activity and Continue reading >>

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