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Is Poke Good For Diabetics

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Good News For Diabetics: New Gadget Ends The Painful Poke - Business Line

Good News For Diabetics: New Gadget Ends The Painful Poke - Business Line

Good news for diabetics: new gadget ends the painful poke Indian-origin scientist develops pain-free alternative to monitoring blood glucose levels A new technology developed by an Indian-origin scientist that uses a laser device, may help diabetics non-invasively monitor blood glucose levels, eliminating the need for daily finger pricking. Currently, many people with diabetes need to measure their blood glucose levels by pricking their fingers, squeezing drops of blood onto test strips, and processing the results with portable glucometers. The new technology, developed by Gin Jose and a team at the University of Leeds, uses a small device with low-powered lasers to measure blood glucose levels without penetrating the skin. It could give people a simpler, pain-free alternative to finger pricking. The technology has continuous monitoring capabilities making it ideal for development as a wearable device. This could help improve the lives of millions of people by enabling them to constantly monitor their glucose levels without the need for an implant. Unlike the traditional method, this new non-invasive technology can constantly monitor blood glucose levels, Jose said. As well as being a replacement for finger-prick testing, this technology opens up the potential for people with diabetes to receive continuous readings, meaning they are instantly alerted when intervention is needed. This will allow people to self-regulate and minimise emergency hospital treatment, Jose said. At the heart of the new technology is a piece of nano-engineered silica glass with ions that fluoresce in infrared light when a low power laser light hits them. When the glass is in contact with the users skin, the extent of fluorescence signal varies in relation to the concentration of glucose in thei Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Food Not To Eat With Pre-diabetes

Food Not To Eat With Pre-diabetes

Successful grant writing for two nonprofit organizations earned me awards for community service. For 18 years I ran a residential program for pregnant women addicts and alcoholics, caring for them through natural birth and breastfeeding experiences that focused on bonding as insurance against future abuse and neglect. I published articles about the program. A box of frosted doughnuts.Photo Credit: YekoPhotoStudio/iStock/Getty Images Pre-diabetes, also known as impaired glucose tolerance, is a condition characterized by above-normal blood sugars that do not meet the diagnositic criteria for Type 2 diabetes. To reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease and stroke, those with pre-diabetes are advised to lose weight, exercise and choose healthier substitutes for some types of foods. Partially hydrogenated oils are a source of trans fats. According to an article by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health, consumption of trans fats causes metabolic dysfunction by raising bad and lowering good cholesterol, triggering inflammation, damaging the lining of blood vessels and increasing belly fat, body weight and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a common feature of pre-diabetes; as the liver, muscle and fat cells lose sensitivity to insulin, blood sugars rise. The FDA allows manufacturers to claim zero trans fats when half a gram or less of trans fats is contained in one serving size, so large portions of these foods may have significant trans fats. The process of hydrogenating vegetable oils hardens the fats and gives them a long shelf life. Partially hydrogenated oils can be found in commercially packaged cakes, cookies, chips, crackers, pies, salad dressings, margarine, icings and microwave popcorn. Deep fried foods such as Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Diet: Good For Everyone (diabetic Or Not!)

The Diabetic Diet: Good For Everyone (diabetic Or Not!)

If you’ve been diagnosed with any type of diabetes, you are usually taught to eat a specific diet. The diabetic diet encourage minimizing the blood sugar spikes that occur throughout the day. But why wait until you have diabetes to follow these rules? Taking preventative measures now will greatly reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, and eating like a diabetic is a great way to start. Let’s break down the diabetic diet strategies and learn why we should all be eating this way now - instead of waiting until we have to. Read more about symptoms of diabetes to watch out for 1. Increase Fiber Intake Diabetics are encouraged to get more fiber into their diets to help with stabilizing blood sugar levels. Fiber is also excellent for optimal digestion and elimination. Fiber is something we all need and few of us are actually getting enough of it. Many people think if they have a bowl of cereal in the morning that they are getting their daily fiber intake. The truth is, getting fiber from a processed cereal grain is not the best source. The best source of fiber is from whole foods: beans, lentils, fruits, vegetables (peels!) and 100 percent whole grains. Top food sources of fiber include turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens, navy beans, eggplant, raspberries, and cinnamon. Sugar in any form needs to be strictly watched on a diabetic diet, especially if you’re insulin dependent. This is the main cause of a rise in blood sugar levels. The thing is not to eliminate your carbohydrates altogether (as with the case with the popular Atkins diet) but to make better choices. Choose carbohydrates that will gradually raise your blood sugar levels instead of quickly spiking them. Recognizing the bad sources of carbohydrates and replacing them with a healthier option Continue reading >>

5 Reasons You Should Eat More Poke Bowls: An R.d. Explains - Mindbodygreen

5 Reasons You Should Eat More Poke Bowls: An R.d. Explains - Mindbodygreen

If you haven't heard of poke yet, you will soon. It's one of the biggest trends to come on to the culinary scene this yearand it's perfect for summer. Pronounced poh-kay, this raw fish salad is typically served as an appetizer in Hawaiian cuisine. Poke is the Hawaiian verb for "slice" or "cut," so it often includes either small cuts of fresh tuna or octopus. Typically, poke is seasoned with soy sauce, scallions, and sesame oil. It might also include a variety of other seasonings, such as wasabi, seaweed , and chili pepper. So, why should you try this fishy new food trend? As a registered dietitian, and here are five reasons I recommend poke: Poke is one of freshest, tastiest, healthiest new food trends around. You can consume 4 ounces of poke for just under 150 calories, only 5 grams of fat, and 24 grams of protein. Not only is it naturally low in calories, but it also usually doesnt come with rice. Unlike sushi, poke is served with a variety of veggies and fresh marinades. Glutinous rice and mayonnaise need not apply. Poke delivers those important heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s help to protect your heart and reduce the risk of death from heart disease by lowering your blood pressure and heart rate and improving other cardiovascular risk factors. Fish intake also has also been linked to a lower risk of stroke, depression, and mental decline as we age. Consuming poke regularly also will keep you in line with the American Heart Associations recommendation to consume fish at least twice a week. Less expensive than a pricey sushi dish, you can walk away with a bill for less than $15 and be quite satisfied from your poke bowl full of fresh fish and crunchy veggies. With our need for speed in the preparation department, especially during warm summer days, poke i Continue reading >>

Can A Person With Diabetes Eat That???

Can A Person With Diabetes Eat That???

Can a person with Diabetes REALLY eat that? Does eating with Diabetes make you feel like you have been dumped by your lover (good food)? Being told what I CANT eat after my diagnosis of Diabetes make me feel the same way I felt when I would go through a romantic break-up. It was a loss of something I loved, or thought I loved. Good thing to remember for both eating and love: there are plenty of other fish in the sea. Now if you dont like fish.well So many people with and without Diabetes are just amazed with what we can eat. For many people looking in at us, not much has changed. The prevailing thought is: Oh, dear, you have Diabetes; you will DIE if you even look at a spoon of sugar. I am so tired of explaining that it is not just sugar but ALL carbohydrates that we need to watch. And looking, even eating a small amount wont kill us. I eat like a king. As those of you that follow along with me on a regular basis know, I do eat desserts, do eat some breads, and do eat some carbohydrates. I simply make choices to use lower carbohydrate products and alternatives to higher carbohydrate foods. Choices like using cauliflower and spaghetti squash in place of potatoes and pasta. But I ONLY use them when they work. make a smaller portion of smashed spuds taste Case in point is what I call cow poke pie. Many of you know this as Shepards pie. For me if it is Shepards pie, it better have some sheep (lamb) in it. The recipe I do most often uses ground beef, hence Cow poke pie. I have made it using a cauliflower crust. It looks the same but it tastes very different. Not bad mind you, but different. As a chef and an eater, I am not ready to settle fornot bad. No purpose in eating on the rebound. There is a song titled: Loads of lovely love.( Richard Rodgers NO Strings)We are told: p Continue reading >>

Keeping Track Of Your Blood Sugar

Keeping Track Of Your Blood Sugar

Checking your blood sugar levels is a really important part of taking care of diabetes. Why? Because knowing what those levels are will help you keep your blood sugar under control something that helps you feel good and keeps you healthy. Most kids with diabetes check their blood sugar levels before breakfast, before lunch, before dinner, and then again at bedtime. Some kids need to check more often. Your doctor will let you and your parents know when and how often you need to do your checks. You also might need to check your blood sugar during exercise and when you're sick. You might wonder why checks are needed in these situations. It's because food, medicine, exercise, and illness all can affect blood sugar levels. Your doctor will tell you and your parents what to do if any of these affect your glucose levels. You probably have a routine for checking your blood sugar levels. You might stick with that plan for a long time. But if something changes like you get sick or join the soccer team you'll probably have to check more often. People who use an insulin pump or who need to control their blood sugar levels very closely also need to check their levels more often. Sometimes your mom or dad might wake you up in the middle of the night to check your blood sugar levels. You probably won't even remember it the next day! They're just checking to make sure your level isn't getting too low or too high while you're sleeping. Blood sugar levels can be tested at home or at school using a blood glucose meter, which is a computerized device that measures the amount of glucose in a sample of your blood and displays it on a screen. To get a sample of your blood, a small needle called a lancet is used to poke the skin (usually on a finger or on your arm) to get one drop of blood. T Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Every pregnancy has its own set of ups, downs, special moments, and emotional setbacks. My pregnancy with Dessa was no exception! Thankfully, the joyful moments from my pregnancy greatly outshine the frustrating events, but there were some moments that were challenging for me to overcome, especially when it came to my health. I occasionally shared small glimpses of my experience with gestational diabetes on the blog and Instagram account, and I have recently become aware of the fact that it’s a fairly common diagnosis for many expectant mothers. And yet, somehow, it can feel incredibly alienating to be diagnosed because many women don’t realize they know other people who have gone through the same thing. It’s my hope to share a little bit about my own experience with gestational diabetes to offer a little reassurance to anyone else diagnosed with the condition that you are not alone and also let you know what other unexpected repercussions may await you down the road. I always found the shock of new information to be the biggest obstacle to overcome. Hopefully this post will soften the blow a bit and help you feel more equipped to handle what lies ahead. From the One-Hour Glucose Test … I turned 35 when I was 2 months along, which automatically qualified the pregnancy as being “high risk”. Those words sounded scary, but everything went smoothly for the first few months. My weight and blood pressure were always under control and the baby grew and developed exactly as she should. At my 28 week OB appointment, I had the infamous glucose screening. (I call it infamous because I’ve always heard other expectant mommies talk about how nasty and terrible the test was.) Turns out, the test really itself isn’t that bad. You just have to drink 10 ounces of a sweet Continue reading >>

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

5 Must-have Tools To Measure Your Blood Sugar

If you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need some supplies to help you manage your blood sugar. These include: Blood Sugar Meter This device, also called a glucose meter or monitor, measures how much sugar (or glucose) is in a drop of your blood. It can tell you when your sugar is too low or too high. Talk to your doctor about what to do in those situations. Glucose meters can also show you how diet, exercise, stress, sickness, and your medications affect blood sugar. “Get the [one] that you feel comfortable and confident using,” says Jane Seley, a diabetes nurse practitioner at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Make sure the screen is large enough to read. And choose a meter that requires less than a microliter blood sample. “It’s much more comfortable,” Seley says. “You don’t have to stick yourself as deep. It’s much easier to be successful, and you won’t waste as many test strips.” Consider a meter that can download your readings to your smartphone, tablet, or computer. “You can see charts of how your blood sugars differ throughout the day,” Seley says. “It helps you make better decisions about things like when to exercise and what to have for breakfast.” Test Strips, Lancets, and Lancet Device Each small plastic strip contains chemicals that convert the sugar in your blood into an electric current that your meter can read. Wash your hands first, then put a test strip into your meter. Prick the side of your fingertip with a small needle called a lancet. The lancet fits inside a lancet device. About the shape and size of a pen, it’s spring-loaded to help you prick your finger easily with just the right amount of pressure. You then squeeze a single drop of blood onto the strip, and your meter measures the sugar. If you’r Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Mythsbusted!

10 Diabetes Mythsbusted!

Im a mom of two young boys and the founder of the Life Coaching organization Be You Only Betterand a type 1 diabetic. I consider myself an expert in all three areas, with more than 10,000 hours of rich experience in each. I thrive off the challenges and successes each brings my way. I live and breathe my expertise in all three areas. My passion as a Life Coach and my dedication as a mom are obvious. But diabetes? Really? Yes, I live and breathe that too, and I love the positive attributes that 20 years of diabetes has bestowed upon me. This autoimmune disease isnt always the easiest thing to manage, yet its given me strength beyond anything I could have imagined. It has inspired me be as healthy as possible, to try new things, to never accept failure and to believe that if I can handle diabetes, I can pretty much handle anything that comes my way. There is a sunnier, less serious side to diabetes that I like to share, and even poke some fun at it. After all, I have received some 172,000 pokes in the form of injections and finger pricks in my lifetime. Its high time to poke back. Diabetes is surrounded by myths and misconceptions that can create a picture full of stereotypes and stigma. Here are the top 10 truths that non-diabetic people should know about us sugary sweet ones. 1. Yes, it hurts. Its a needle going into my fleshwhat did you think? They say a stupid question deserves a stupid answer, or is it that there is no such thing as a stupid question? Either way, asking if a needle hurts when you plunge it into your skin is like asking me if I want a martini. Duh. 2. No, my diabetes wont go away. And you cant cure it with vitamins or supplements. By the time someone is diagnosed with diabetes, that person has lost a major portion of his or her beta cell function. Un Continue reading >>

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

I’ve received many an email from people telling me what a bastard I am to mention weight loss as a benefit of eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet. I’m always happy to get these emails because I like hearing different viewpoints. From what I’ve gathered, there are a couple of directions that people generally take on the losing weight train. There are the people who stand up for Big is Beautiful and any mention of weight loss stems from a collective societal dictation based on unrealistic and contrived views on beauty and acceptance. (Say that three times fast) Then we have people who for whatever reason are pro weight loss. Maybe for people trying to sell stuff it’s an easy market to tap; maybe some people are hung up on supermodels, and maybe some people just feel better after they lose a few pounds. It’s different for everyone, and everyone’s view should be accepted, regardless of your take. But here’s the thing. There’s not a fine line, there’s a line the size of the Grand fucking Canyon between losing weight when one is already healthy, and losing weight to save one’s life or to add a great deal of quality to that life. The conversation about losing weight for actual health reasons transcends any conversation about whether or not the topic of weight loss puts a damper on people’s confidence and self acceptance in society. For some people, there’s no angle or agenda, losing weight for them means going from pre-diabetes to no diabetes, having high blood pressure to normal blood pressure and having high cholesterol to perfect cholesterol. So for me, mentioning weight loss as a benefit of eating a plant based diet isn’t just important; it’s really fucking important. There are people who have turned their entire world around by dropping extra Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Controlled Diets

Carbohydrate Controlled Diets

Tweet One area of confusion for diabetics and their diets is carbohydrates. So, should you eat carbohydrates or avoid them? Carbohydrates have a direct influence on blood sugar levels and so diets followed by people with diabetes tend to focus either on the quantity of carbohydrate intake or the speed at which carbohydrates are absorbed by the body. In the UK, patients diagnosed with diabetes are generally recommended by health professionals to follow a low GI diet rather than a low-carb diet. What is a carbohydrate controlled diet? A carbohydrate controlled diet is a diet in which carbohydrate intake is either limited or set at a particular value. Setting carbohydrate intake at set values or limits can be used by people with diabetes help stabilise blood glucose levels. Examples of carbohydrate controlled diets include: Fixed carbohydrate intakes A diet involving fixed intakes of carbohydrate through the day can help to simply diabetes control and may be helpful to people on insulin, and particularly those on fixed dose insulin regimens. Having a fixed intake of carbohydrate each day offers less flexibility in terms of meals but can offer more consistency over blood glucose control. People with type 1 diabetes will still need to have competence in carbohydrate counting. Restricted carbohydrate diets Restricted carbohydrate diets set a limit on how much carbohydrate you take in over the course of a day or for each meal. Low carbohydrate diets are a form of restricted carbohydrate diet. Restricted carbohydrate diets may specify a maximum value of carbohydrate intake. However, sometimes this is not needed, particularly if the diet suggests avoiding many of the kind of foods with higher carbohydrate intakes. How do restricted carbohydrate diets work? Restricting carbohydra Continue reading >>

10 Diet Commandments For Better Diabetes Management

10 Diet Commandments For Better Diabetes Management

Twitter Summary: The ten diet commandments I follow for healthy eating w/ #diabetes + how to write your own & overcome obstacles A colorful, downloadable PDF of this article can be found here (convenient for printing!) The question – “What diet should I follow?” – has perhaps never been more confusing, more controversial, or more stressful. There are more diets, diet books, diet opinions, and news headlines than ever before. In reality, no single “diet” trumps them all, especially for people with diabetes – all approaches have their pros and cons, whether you’re talking about health effects (e.g., blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol), cost, convenience, or taste. So instead of a “diet,” I prefer to think about eating in terms of general strategies, or what this article is calling my “commandments.” After experimenting with many different eating approaches over the years, I’ve homed in on ten eating commandments that I strive to follow every day – these strategies seem to keep my blood sugars in range, give me plenty of energy, are transportable to different eating environments, are relatively convenient, and fit within my budget. Of course, eating preferences are highly personal (especially in diabetes), and my own principles may not apply for everyone. If you find this article useful, check out my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines! A Starting Point: Brainstorming Your Eating Commandments 1. When you see your best blood sugars (ideally 80-140 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal, what did you eat? How did you eat? When and where did you eat? How did you manage your diabetes around these times? 2. When you see higher blood sugars (over 200 mg/dl) 90 minutes after a meal, what did you eat? How did you eat? When and where did you eat? How d Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Diabetics

Healthy Eating For Diabetics

In the Spotlight Contributed by Gloria Brien, RD, CDE and Jacqueline Roos, RD, CDE Eating healthy is the first step in controlling diabetes. The following are some helpful tips for healthy eating. Eat three meals a day Eat your meals at the same time each day and do not skip meals Eat about the same amount of food each day The plate method is a good way to control your portions One-half of your plate should be covered with low starch vegetables One quarter of your plate should be covered with starchy foods One quarter of your plate should be covered with protein. Include baked, broiled, or grilled lean meats, low fat cheeses, eggs, or vegetarian protein choices like beans and lentils, as part of your meal Add a small glass of low fat milk and a piece of fruit, and your meal is complete! Low starch vegetables are low in carbohydrate and high in fiber. Add vegetables to your meals for variety, and to help fill you up. Examples include: Brussel Sprouts Green beans Eat more fiber Fiber can help slow down the rise in blood sugar following a meal. To get more fiber in your diet, eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, choose whole grain bread/cereal and eat more beans or legumes. Control your eating of carbohydrates Carbohydrate is the main nutrient that affects blood sugar levels. When you eat a carbohydrate, it is turned into sugar by your body. Therefore, it is important to control the amount of carbohydrate that you eat each day. Carbohydrates consist of sugars, starches, and fiber. Common sources of carbohydrates include: Starchy vegetables (potatoes, corn, peas) Beans and lentils Bread, cereal, pasta, rice Milk, yogurt, pudding Fruit and fruit juice Desserts, candy, ice cream, doughnuts, sugar sweetened beverages You should eat about 60 grams of carbo Continue reading >>

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