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Is Peanut Butter Sandwich Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes Type 2 Diet: Avoid This Popular Sandwich Filler To Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes Type 2 Diet: Avoid This Popular Sandwich Filler To Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes type 2 diet: Avoid this popular sandwich filler to control blood sugar Diabetes type 2 diet: Avoid this popular sandwich filler to control blood sugar TYPE 2 diabetics are warned to steer clear of dangerous trans fats, as they increase insulin resistance, belly fat and inflammation. The fats are hiding in some of your favourite sandwich fillers. Trans fats are found in many commercially-made baked and fried foods, and are extremely unhealthy. But they are particularly dangerous for type 2 diabetes sufferers, as they increase insulin resistance and belly fat. Trans fats occur naturally in low levels in some foods such as meat and dairy products, but its the industrially produced trans fats that are most concerning. The biggest source is partially hydrogenated oil, which is used in processed biscuits, cakes, pies, pastries and fried foods. The oil is favoured for its stability and long shelf life. According to medical website HealthLine, trans fats have been linked to increased inflammation, another blow for diabetics. They also lower goodHDL cholesterol levels. Diabetes type 2 diet: Cut this dinnertime side out your diet These artificial fats are also thought to increase the risk of coronary heart disease, the UKs leading cause of death for men and the second most common cause of death for women, after dementia and Alzheimers. The UK food industry has voluntarily reduced the levels of trans fats in recent years, but they have not been banned. Many brands of peanut butter contain trans fats, masquerading as hydrogenated vegetable oil on the label. The oil makes the peanut butter more spreadable and increases its shelf life. Diabetes type 2 diet: Avoid trans fats to control blood sugar Diabetes type 2 diet: Avoid peanut butter and other spreads containing trans f Continue reading >>

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes

The 21 Best Snack Ideas If You Have Diabetes Written by Brianna Elliott, RD on January 14, 2018 Choosing healthy snacks can be difficult when you have diabetes. The key is to choose snacks that are high in fiber, protein and healthy fats. These nutrients will help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Its also important to snack on nutrient-dense foods that promote overall health. This article discusses 21 excellent snacks to eat if you have diabetes. Hard-boiled eggs are a super healthy snack for people with diabetes. Their protein content really makes them shine. One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat ( 1 , 2 ). In one study, 65 people with type 2 diabetes ate two eggs daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, they experienced significant reductions in their fasting blood sugar levels. They also had lower hemoglobin A1c, which is a measure of long-term blood sugar control ( 3 ). Eggs are known to promote fullness, an important aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. This disease is associated with a greater likelihood of becoming overweight and developing heart disease ( 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ). You can enjoy a hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole. Yogurt with berries is an excellent diabetes-friendly snack for a variety of reasons. First, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, the organ responsible for releasing hormones that lower blood sugar levels ( 8 , 9 ). Additionally, berries are a great source of fiber. For example, a 1-cup (148-gram) serving of blueberries provides 4 grams of fiber, which helps slow digestion and stabilize bl Continue reading >>

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

When you have type 2 diabetes, you want to get the most bang for your exercise buck. You’ll need to fuel up the right way before, during, and after you work out. If you can manage your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, you don’t need a pre-workout snack any more than someone without the disease. But if you take insulin or a drug that pushes your pancreas to make it, you might have to think before you snack. What to eat depends on a few things: How high your blood sugar is before you work out How long you’ll be at it What time of day you plan to do it How your body reacts to exercise Check your blood sugar. If your reading is between 200 and 300 mg/dl and you’ve already eaten at least once that day, you probably don’t need to eat anything. But you do need to check for ketones if it’s over 250. Your body makes them when it burns fat for fuel instead of sugar. Don’t exercise if you have them. If your reading is over 300, ask your doctor if exercise is OK. Otherwise, grab a snack with 15-30 grams of carbs. The lower your blood sugar is before you start and the longer you plan to work out, the larger your snack should be, up to 30 grams of carbs. You’ll probably have to try a few options and amounts to see what works best. These snacks offer 15 grams of carbs with little prep time: 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 ounces) 1 slice of bread (1 ounce) or 1 (6-inch) tortilla 1/2 cup of oatmeal 2/3 cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with sugar substitutes These have 30 grams of carbs: 1/2 peanut butter sandwich (1 slice whole wheat bread with 1 tablespoon peanut butter) and 1 cup milk 1 English muffin and 1 teaspoon low-fat margarine 3/4 cup whole grain, ready-to-eat cereal and 1/2 cup fat-free milk Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Written by Courtney Winston; Updated June 22, 2017 Whether served on whole grain toast or spread on a few high-fiber crackers, peanut butter packs a low-carb and nutrition-rich punch to the diabetic diet. Rich in unsaturated fat and protein, all-natural peanut butter can make a nutritious addition to meals and snacks for individuals with diabetes. Peanut butter's low carbohydrate content keeps blood sugar under control, while its healthy fats satisfy the appetite for several hours. While people with diabetes should limit their portion size to avoid weight gain, peanut butter can still be a healthy addition to a diabetic diet. In its natural form with no added fats, sweeteners or sugars, peanut butter is considered a nutritional powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Because there is no cholesterol and very little saturated fat in peanut butter, it is also appropriate for people with cardiac problems. The carbohydrate content of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving. Because of its low carbohydrate and high healthy fat and protein content, peanut butter does not elevate blood sugar. According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with diabetes should consume no more than 2 tablespoons of peanut butter at one snack or meal. Even though peanut butter does pack a healthy nutritional punch, it is also high in calories, and 2 tablespoons equals roughly 200 hundred calories, or 10% of the daily caloric needs for a 2,000-calorie diet. Individuals who are diabetic and who want to lose weight may consider reducing their portion size of peanut butter to 1 tablespoon at a time, simply to cut the calories but still reap some of the nutrit Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

Being asleep. Being awake. Hot weather. Cold weather. Seems there’s no end to the number of things that can raise your blood glucose levels. No wonder diabetes management can be such an obstacle course. But it’s not all doom and gloom. For every factor that unexpectedly sends your blood sugars spiralling out of control, there’s an equally unexpected – and often enjoyable – way to keep them under control. 1. Peanut butter We know that peanuts are great for people with diabetes. But one group of researchers from Brazil were more interested in peanut butter (and why wouldn’t they be). The team split participants into three groups: the first ate 1.5 ounces of peanuts; the second had three tablespoons of peanut butter with breakfast; and the third had no peanut butter or peanuts. They all ate the same lunch of white bread and strawberry jam. Interestingly, the researchers found that the peanut butter was better for blood glucose levels than the peanuts. The second group felt fuller for long, and had lower blood sugars when they were tested after lunch. Not all peanut butter is as good for you, of course. But the researchers found that the healthier brands can do you a lot of good. Turns out that peanut butter has a lovely combination of high protein, fibre and healthy oils. So you no longer have to feel ashamed for eating it straight from the jar with a tablespoon. I certainly won’t. 2. Red wine Red wine lowers blood sugars by stopping the intestines absorbing glucose. Recently, plenty of researchers have become very interested in the effects of red wine on weight loss and blood glucose levels. A number of studies reckon it could be beneficial. That said, drinking too much of it can cause problems (such as a build-up of fat around the liver), so everything in m Continue reading >>

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Consuming peanut butter or peanuts for breakfast can control blood sugar throughout most of the day, even after eating a high carbohydrate lunch… In addition to this “Second Meal Effect,” peanuts and peanut butter caused a significant reduction in the desire to eat for up to 12 hours and a significant increase in the secretion of the hormone PYY that promotes satiety and feelings of fullness. The study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. The principal investigator, Dr. Richard Mattes of Purdue University explained, “If you include peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast, you not only diminish the rise in blood sugar at breakfast but also again after lunch, helping to reduce blood sugar over a very large portion of the day.” During three phases of the study, 1.5 ounces of peanuts, 3 tablespoons of peanut butter, or no peanuts or peanut butter were consumed with a breakfast consisting of orange juice and cream of wheat followed by a lunch consisting of white bread and strawberry jam. Blood samples and appetite ratings were taken over a series of three hours following breakfast and again after lunch to assess glucose control and satiety; participants were also asked to keep a food diary for the remainder of the day after leaving the testing site. Results showed that peanut butter or peanuts included with breakfast promotes secretion of the appetite-suppressing hormone peptide YY (PYY). In addition, participants who consumed peanut butter or peanuts with breakfast reported a lower desire to eat for up to 8 to 12 hours later and maintained lower blood Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates & Blood Sugar Control For People With Diabetes

Carbohydrates & Blood Sugar Control For People With Diabetes

Contrary to popular thinking, people with diabetes can enjoy moderate amounts of carbohydrates in their diets. The emphasis is on carbohydrate control NOT carbohydrate avoidance. Actually, carbohydrates are the body's preferred energy source, and roughly half of your daily calorie intake should come from carbohydrate foods. Carbohydrates are the starches and sugars in food. They are found in grains, starchy vegetables, fruit, milk, and sweets. What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a meal planning approach that evenly distributes your carbohydrate calories throughout your day by counting out the right amount of carbohydrate foods for each meal and snack. The emphasis with carbohydrate counting is on how much carbohydrate you eat at any one time, NOT on which type of carbohydrate you choose. Stay away from fad diets that restrict the amount of carbohydrates you can eat. What about sugar? Research has shown that sugar does not raise blood sugar levels any more than starches do. This means you can eat sugary foods (cookies, cakes, pies, and candy) as long as you count them as part of your total carbohydrate intake. Keep in mind that foods high in sugar are often high in fat and calories, and if eaten in excess might elevate sugar and triglyceride levels, and can lead to weight gain. A sugar substitute is a sweetener that is used in place of sugar. The sugar substitutes approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are aspartame, saccharin, acesulfame potassium, sucralose, and neotame. All can be safely consumed in moderation. Sugar substitutes do not need to be counted in your meal plan. If they are used as a sweetener in food that contains few calories and no other carbohydrate (such as sugar-free soft drinks or sugar-free gelatin), that food is cons Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

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