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Is Orange Juice Good For A Diabetic?

The Best Fruit Drinks For Diabetics

The Best Fruit Drinks For Diabetics

One hundred percent fruit juice has a medium effect on blood sugar levels. Marcelo Ferrate has been writing professionally since 2010. He has worked in the field of health care as a dietetic technician, and he writes about health, fitness, food and diet for LIVESTRONG.COM. Ferrate holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition and dietetics from Florida International University. For diabetics, management of blood sugar can be achieved through diet by understanding the glycemic index. The glycemic index represents the effect in blood sugar rise stimulated by a specific food (less than 10 is considered a low effect, and more than 20 is considered a high effect). Because 100 percent fruit juice stimulates a medium effect in blood sugar and represents an excellent source of B vitamins, vitamin C, potassium, phosphorous and magnesium, it is preferable to smoothies or artificially flavored drinks. Orange juice has a glycemic index of about 10. Orange juice is a nutritious way for a diabetic to start his day. According to NutritionData, orange juice is packed with vitamin C (anti-inflammatory), vitamin A, vitamin B1 (co-enzyme necessary for energy production), folic acid (essential for red blood cells) and potassium (essential in muscle contraction). Orange juice has a medium glycemic response because of its high content of sucrose (about 20 g per 8 fl oz. cup). The USDA Food Guide Pyramid recommends that adults consume an average of 2 cups of fresh fruit (including juice) per day. Therefore, diabetics should limit the amount of orange juice to less than 1 cup per day to avoid hyperglycemic loads. Mix your apple juice with unsweetened applesauce to help lower glycemic load. Apple juice is another healthy alternative when it comes to choosing fresh 100 percent fruit juice. Although Continue reading >>

Is Orange Juice Good For Diabetes

Is Orange Juice Good For Diabetes

Our body needs vitamin C: orange juice is very rich in vitamin C with one cup containing over 140% of the daily value of vitamin C needed by the body. And, that’s not all; you also get 10% of DA for foliate and 20% for the thiamine additional vital nutrients. Impressive, right! As much as orange juice provides our body with these essential nutrients, we have also to be on the lookout for diabetes. Consuming a lot of orange juice can lead to an increase in the blood sugar levels and hence cause diabetes. Glycemic Index So as to determine how certain food substances affect the blood sugar level, the glycemic index is used as a measuring index. Food substances with high glycemic index are likely to cause an increase in blood sugar levels in the body. On a scale of 1-100 orange juice has a glycemic index rated between 66 and 76, the rating varies depending on whether the orange juice is fresh and there are times that even the concentration has an effect on the rating scale. Use during Hypoglycemia Diabetic people with low blood sugar levels are highly recommended to take orange juice. Drinking orange juice increases the blood sugar level, as a result, treating hypoglycemia. Take 4 ounces and if there is no significant improvement increase your intake. You may ask can diabetics eat orange? Recommended Intake Although orange juice contains carbohydrates that may cause an increase in blood sugar level, diabetic people should ensure that they take at least two fruits in a day. With Folate, fiber and Vitamin C orange juice provide essential nutrients to the body. Considerations So as to reduce the rate at which carbohydrates are absorbed in the body causing a rise in the blood sugar level: you should ensure you don’t take food rich on the glycemic index on their own. On the Continue reading >>

Should I Avoid Drinking Orange Juice If I Have Diabetes?

Should I Avoid Drinking Orange Juice If I Have Diabetes?

There is a time and a place for any food with diabetes. Orange juice is great for picking up low blood sugars, typically 4oz will do the trick. If you really enjoy orange juice you can make it fit into your plan as long as you watch the portion size and watch how many other sources of carbohydrate are at that meal. Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

If my blood glucose goes low, drinking orange juice can help raise it. But how about drinking orange juice when my blood sugar level is normal? I’m concerned that it will raise my sugar too much. So I’ve been staying away from fruit juices and just eat the fruit itself. Continue reading >>

Freshly Squeezed Juices That Are Good For Diabetics

Freshly Squeezed Juices That Are Good For Diabetics

Go green to save calories and carbs.Photo Credit: KayTaenzer/iStock/Getty Images Freshly Squeezed Juices That Are Good for Diabetics Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. When managing your diabetes, it's always better to eat the fruit or vegetable than drink its juice. But that doesn't mean you have to cut juice out of your diet altogether, especially if it's 100 percent juice that you make yourself. As with everything you eat, the key is to control the amount you consume. Consult your dietitian to discuss how fresh juice might fit into your diet plan. The primary concern with drinking juice for people with diabetes is that it's a concentrated source of calories and carbs. Plus, you don't have the fiber to slow digestion or sugar absorption. The American Diabetes Association suggests that when you drink juice, you make sure it's 100-percent fruit or vegetable juice without any added sugar. For reference, a 4-ounce portion of fruit juice has an average of 15 grams of carbs, and the same serving of vegetable juice has 5 grams of carbs, on average. To get the nutrition you seek from drinking fresh juice without all the sugar, stick with nonstarchy vegetables when making your juice. A good, relatively low-sugar combination might include carrots with cucumbers and celery. Or, if you like fresh green juice, try spinach and kale with tomato. The nice thing about making your own juice is that you can add some of the pulp left in your juicer to the juice, which provides a bit Continue reading >>

Orange Juice How Much Is Safe To Drink?

Orange Juice How Much Is Safe To Drink?

By bicker68 Latest Reply2012-10-30 22:19:32 -0500 Started2010-09-08 23:07:37 -0500 10 Likes Over Labor Day weekend I crontractacted a bad chest cold and Sinus Infection. And when I have a cold I like my orange juice, but with my diabetes know I can't have much. How much is to much? I have been having a small glass in the morning and a small glass in the evening. It also hasn't been easy on my Asthma, Broncitis and COPD, in which I've been having to use my inhaler and Nublizer more. I would welcome anyone's advice, Thank you in advance. bearly any at all like 1 oz dont mind a lil exaggeration but u def caint have much thats y all i drin is diet cause when i drink soda i drink a lot i have huge 40 oz cups I can not drink to much orange juice because it elevates blood sugar levels however I keep on hand Vitamin C in the form of Halls Defense which is a dietary supplement drops. They contain 6g of carbohydrate, 6g of sugar, Vitamin C 106mg 2 per serving. I too have had a cold since last week and I am feeling better. I did take with Green Tea because a many cold medicines run up blood sugar and blood pressure, too. Hope you feel better!! I was told no more than 4 oz.'s. For ME that's only when my sugar is low! Does it raise your BS #'s? NanaEllen :) I stay away from fruit juices, they do not agree with me But I drink at least 4-5 bottles of ice cold water each and every day. I stay hydrated, bg #'s are good, and I just feel good. Drink half your body weight in water. Over ice makes your system burn a few calories. Trop 50 is my new best friend. I could not have oj. It burned my stomach up. Then the 2 month before I was diagnosed I drank Simply Orange like a fish. I can only have Trop 50 in the morning or my sugar goes off track but that's ok. I still like it. When I drink o Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Orange Juice?

Can Diabetics Drink Orange Juice?

If you’re living with diabetes, caution around what you eat and drink is natural. Certain foods like sugary sodas are clearly off the cards. But when fresh produce and fiber are recommended, or your sugar levels are dipping, is it okay to reach for a glass of orange juice? What’s In Your Orange Juice? A fresh squeezed glass of orange juice contains 112 kcal, 20.83 gm of sugars, and 25.79 gm of carbohydrates. This 248 gm serving also delivers lots of calcium and vitamin C, as well as nutrients like potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin A and folate. These minerals and vitamins are important for a range of normal body functions and also have antioxidant properties that make them good for health.1 Yet, there is concern around whether or not diabetics should even be considering having the juice due to the sugar and carb content in a glass of OJ(orange juice). Should Diabetics Be Worried? The American Diabetes Association recommends drinking low calorie(or even zero calorie drinks) like plain water or unsweetened tea and coffee. When you need a cool drink, they suggest water with a squeeze of lime. Flavored water with orange slices could work just as well. But what about orange juice?2 The Association advises against consuming sugary drinks of any kind, and that could well mean your favorite packaged orange juice doesn’t pass muster. In fact, some fruit juices can be as high in natural sugars as sodas, even if they don’t have any added sugar in them.3 If you’re watching your diet and taking care not to have high glycemic index(GI) foods which increase blood glucose levels quickly (causing a potentially dangerous spike in sugar levels), then aim for foods with a glycemic load of 10 and under. These are low GI foods. Once the GI goes over 20, they’re considered Continue reading >>

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

To successfully manage type 2 diabetes, plan your beverages as carefully as you plan your food choices. That typically means taking sugary drinks — such as soda, sweet tea, and even juice — off the table. You might be surprised at how much a single drink can affect you when you have type 2 diabetes. Drinking just one soda a day is associated with developing type 2 diabetes, according to 2013 research in the journal PLoS One. When you are faced with so many new constraints on sugar and other carbs after a diabetes diagnosis, you may be left asking, “What can I still drink?” Fortunately, there’s a variety of refreshing, flavorful beverages you can enjoy, says Katherine Basbaum, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. Before you take your next sip, here are the top drinking dos and don’ts for those with diabetes. Do Drink: Water Water is one of the few beverages you can drink without worry throughout the day and a great way to stay hydrated. If you often forget to drink as much water as you should, Basbaum has a suggestion for increasing your intake: Drink one 8-ounce glass of water for every other beverage you drink that contains sugar substitutes or caffeine. Shake things up with sparkling water or by squeezing lemon or lime juice into your glass. Do Drink: Skim Milk “Skim or low-fat milk is also a good beverage option, but it must be counted toward your carb total for a particular meal or snack,” Basbaum says. Cow’s milk also provides protein and calcium. Be aware that non-dairy options, such as almond milk, may have added sweeteners and flavorings. Don’t Drink: Sugar-Sweetened Soda or Tea “Sugar-sweetened drinks are absorbed into your bloodstr Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Oranges are a healthy citrus fruit, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fortunately, oranges contain components that make them a nutritious part of a diabetic diet as long as you eat them in concert with other healthy foods. Video of the Day People with type 2 diabetes cannot properly modulate blood sugar levels because they either don't produce enough insulin or their bodies can't effectively use the insulin they do produce. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, making up between 90 to 95 percent of all diabetics, according to FamilyDoctor.org. The food that a type 2 diabetic eats can significantly affect blood glucose levels, so choosing the right foods is important. Fruit in a Diabetic Diet Fruit can and should be part of a diabetic's daily diet. Diabetics who eat between 1,600 and 2,000 calories per day need to eat at least three servings of fruit per day. Those consuming 1,200 to 1,600 calories need two fruit servings daily, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The fiber, vitamins and minerals in fruit are essential to maintaining overall health. Because fruits provide carbohydrates, you usually need to pair them with a protein or fat. Oranges provide high levels of fiber, which is important for digestive health, and vitamin C, which supports the immune system. The carbohydrate count in one orange is about 10 to 15 g. For diabetics using a carbohydrate-counting system to determine how much they can eat in a day, an orange is one serving. For diabetics using the glycemic index or glycemic load of foods to plan what they eat, oranges are also a good choice. The glycemic load of an orange is about 5, a low number that indicates the fruit causes only a s Continue reading >>

Does Orange Juice Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Orange Juice Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

One cup of orange juice provides you with an impressive 140 percent of the daily value for vitamin C, as well as 20 percent of the DV for thiamine and 10 percent of the DV for folate. However, diabetics need to take care when consuming orange juice, as it can quickly cause a rise in blood sugar levels. The glycemic index is used to measure the effect of carbohydrate-containing foods on blood sugar levels. The higher the glycemic index, the more a particular food affects blood sugar levels. Orange juice has a glycemic index rating of between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100, depending on the type of juice. Many factors can influence the glycemic index of orange juice, including the freshness of the fruit used to make the juice, whether it is fresh or made from concentrate and whether it has pulp. Use During Hypoglycemia Orange juice is one of the recommended sources of carbohydrate for treating low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, in diabetics because it quickly increases your blood sugar levels. For this condition, drink 4 ounces of orange juice and recheck blood sugar levels after 10 to 15 minutes, repeating the treatment if blood sugar levels are still too low. Recommended Intake Even if you are diabetic, you should still consume at least two servings of fruit per day. Although fruits contain carbohydrates that can raise your blood sugar, they are very nutritious and tend to be low in calories and fat. They also contain essential nutrients, including dietary fiber, vitamins C and A and folate. Considerations What you eat with orange juice or other fruits will alter how they affect your blood sugar levels. Always eat fruits, juices and other foods high on the glycemic index with meals instead of on their own. Combining foods high in carbohydrates with foods high in protein, fa Continue reading >>

Orange Juice Healthy For Diabetics

Orange Juice Healthy For Diabetics

Orange juice, despite its high caloric load of sugars, appears to be a healthy food for diabetics due to its mother lode of flavonoids, a study by endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo has shown. The study appeared in the June 2007 issue of Diabetes Care. Flavonoids suppress destructive oxygen free radicals -- also known as reactive oxygen species, or ROS. An overabundance of free radicals can damage all components of the cell, including proteins, fats and DNA, contributing to the development of many chronic diseases, including heart disease and stroke as well as diabetes. "Many major diseases are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation in the arterial wall, so the search for foods that are least likely to cause these conditions must be pursued," said Paresh Dandona, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Diabetes-Endocrinology Center of Western New York and senior author on the study. "Our previous work has shown that 300 calories of glucose induces ROS and other proinflammatory responses," said Dandona, who is Distinguished Professor of Medicine in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. "We hypothesized that 300 calories-worth of orange juice or of fructose would induce less oxidative stress and inflammation than caused by the same amount of calories from glucose." The resulting study involved 32 healthy participants between the ages of 20 and 40, who were of normal weight, with a body mass index of 20-25 kg/m2. Participants were assigned randomly and evenly into four groups, who would drink the equivalent of 300 calories-worth of glucose, fructose, orange juice or saccharin-sweetened water. Fasting blood samples were taken before the test and at 1, 2 and 3 hours after a 10-minute period to consume the drinks. Results showed a significant increase in Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Fruit Juice While whole fruits are a healthy, fiber-rich carbohydrate option for diabetics, the same can’t be said for fruit juice. They may offer more nutritional benefit than soda and other sugary drinks, but fruit juices — even 100 percent fruit juices — are chock full of fruit sugar, and therefore cause a sharp spike in blood sugar. Skipping the glass of juice and opting for the fiber-packed whole fruit counterpart will help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and fill you up on fewer calories, aiding in weight loss. For a refreshing and healthy drink alternative, choose zero-calorie plain or naturally-flavored seltzer and jazz it up with a wedge of lemon or lime. Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

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