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Is Olive Oil Good For Diabetes Patients?

Top 10 Type-2 Superfoods

Top 10 Type-2 Superfoods

Keep these wonder ingredients on your shopping list and in your pantry. These 10 tried-and-true staples are win-win foods for people with type 2 diabetes : nutritious and delicious! Put them on your shopping list. Berries. A smart substitute when you need to limit candy, berries offer sweet flavor, few calories, and lots of fiber. Plus, they have antioxidants , chemicals that help protect against cancer and heart disease . Raspberries, strawberries, and pomegranates (yes, they're considered a berry) also have plenty of ellagic acid, an antioxidant that may counter cancer . Toss fresh or frozen berries in your morning cereal and noontime salads, and keep dried or freeze-dried versions handy for snacking. High-fiber foods like berries help keep blood sugar levels normal. Eggs are an inexpensive source of protein, and they may help you lose weight . Research shows that people who eat eggs at breakfast tend to take in fewer calories the rest of the day. The American Heart Association says healthy adults can eat one egg a day. One reason is that they have little saturated fat . (To be safe, talk to your doctor about your blood cholesterol level.) Hard-boil eggs while you prepare dinner. Then store them in the refrigerator so they're ready for a quick breakfast or snack. Extra virgin olive oil. Called "EVOO" for short, this type of olive oil offers great taste plus type-2- diabetes -friendly monounsaturated fat. "Extra virgin" means the oil is minimally processed, which protects its more than 30 antioxidant and anti-inflammatory plant compounds, says Kathleen Zelman, RD, MPH. Drizzle it on salads, dip bread into it, and use it to saut meat and veggies. Go easy. Like all oils, it packs 120 calories per tablespoon. Kale. This nutrition darling is one of healthiest vegetables. Continue reading >>

Can Olive Oil Be Used To Treat Diabetes Type 2?

Can Olive Oil Be Used To Treat Diabetes Type 2?

There were two studies that I had found on PubMed, which I can't seem to locate again. One showed a study done that expressly demonstrated how olive oil stimulates the inceptors of the liver to function effectively, thereby helping to reverse Type II Diabetes. The second study showed the details of how olive oil stimulates the islet cells of the pancreas, and actually causes them to produce insulin, thereby reversing type I Diabetes. I was wondering if you're familiar with these two? If so, you might want to post them on your site, because this is amazing information, and very true. I have experienced the blood glucose lowering effects of olive oil in myself as well. So this is tried and true information, and it would help diabetics enormously, if they knew. Also, I have seen several studies that show the emulsifying power of olive oil, especially when used in conjunction with lecithin, to reverse fatty liver and break down gallstones. We have a reference page with the articles you may be referring to. I wish olive oil could have the miraculous effects you read about. Instead the studies have involved small numbers of subjects, rats or cell cultures. Diet is definitely important in diabetics but there are no large well controlled studies in humans which show olive oil can treat diabetics. The fact that it has helped one or two or even hundreds of people does not make it "tried and true" information; there may be thousands who it hasn't helped. This conclusion has not yet held up to the scrutiny of the scientific method. Diabetes control may be improved by substituting carbohydrate calories with fat or protein calories something which has been knows for decades - see the OmniHeart trial article on the reference page. We know how to cure the vast majority of adult onset Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: The fat phobia is very powerful. Most of us have been taught or told that fat is bad. So, for years, I avoided adding fat to my meals. But, after I did some research and discovered the health benefits of plant oils such as extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, I became more comfortable with adding fat to my meals. Gradually, I learned to accept that fat was good and that I needed to eat fat on purpose! :-) Extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it provides anti-inflammatory and glucose stabilization benefits, both of which are beneficial to people with Type 2 diabetes. In addition, extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it contains phytonutrients called polyphenols, which are well-known to have anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-inflammatory strength of olive oil rests on its polyphenols. These anti-inflammatory compounds contain several well-researched anti-inflammatory nutrients, including the following: Anthocyanidins (cyanidins, peonidins) Flavones (apigenin, luteolin) Flavonols (quercetin; kaempferol) Flavonoid glycosides (rutin) Lignans (pinoresinol) These anti-inflammatory nutrients help to decrease inflammation markers, such as homocysteine, C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-alpha, interleukin 1-beta, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4. This provides health benefits to people with systemic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Heart disease reduction has been identified in numerous studies of the Mediterranean Diet, which uses olive oil. This reduction in heart disease is due to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and an increase in the HDL:LDL ratio; and a decrease in blood pressure. Olive oil contains heart-healthy fat in the form of oleic acid, Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

During my Masters in Nutrition I had to do one project on my choice of chronic condition and a dietary factor that can help improve that condition. Like most of my projects I chose type 2 diabetes to focus on. Previously I’d learned about oleocanthal, an ingredient in olive oil that is highly anti-inflammatory. And since diabetes is an inflammatory condition I was curious to investigate if using olive oil in a diabetes diet would be beneficial. And I was surprised at what I learned, the benefits were even greater than I expected. Olive oil is very good for diabetes! I did a literature review of the latest research from 2004-2014 and looked at 10 randomized trials, the highest level of study. Seven of those studies far outweighed the benefits of a high carbohydrate diet in their benefits, and the other three showed equivalent results. So what does this all reveal and how can it help you? Olive Oil Helps Diabetes In 3 Ways Reduces Glucose and a1c Helps cholesterol Reduces inflammation Let’s explore how… Components of Olive Oil Olive oil is a monounsaturated fat. The best type of olive oil is extra virgin olive oil and like all fats, olive oil is made up of fatty acids, mostly containing oleic acid at a rate of 55-83%. It also contains 36 known phenolic compounds; these are various compounds that have beneficial effects to our health. As I also mentioned above, it contains one particular compound called oleocanthal that helps reduce inflammation. Researchers have found that oleocanthal has the same anti-inflammatory response in the body as NSAID ibuprofen. It’s not as potent but it doesn’t have any side effects like NSAIDs either, so that’s a great thing. So all in all, it’s got some great components that help improve our health and have great benefits for di Continue reading >>

Olive Oil Has Widespread Benefits For Diabetes Patients

Olive Oil Has Widespread Benefits For Diabetes Patients

Olive Oil Has Widespread Benefits for Diabetes Patients Compound derived from olives increases insulin secretion. Olives and olive oil have been linked to numerous health benefits, including the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet . Despite the positive benefits of this food, little was known about how the compounds and biochemical interactions affect weight loss and type 2 diabetes. A new study published in Biochemistry suggests that the compound oleuropeinderived from olivesincreases insulin secretion, which may control metabolism. The compound was also found to detoxify the signaling molecule amylin that aggregates in type 2 diabetes. The authors hypothesize that oleuropein protects against diabetes through these mechanisms. "Our work provides new mechanistic insights into the long-standing question of why olive products can be anti-diabetic," said lead author Bin Xu, PhD. These results suggest that consuming olives or olive oil may be beneficial for patients with diabetes or even those with prediabetes. Upon further confirmation of its benefits, the Mediterranean dietenriched with olive oil and vegetablesmay be recommended for patients with diabetes. The authors note that the study results could improve the understanding of the mechanisms of olives and could lead to low-cost nutraceuticals to combat diabetes and obesity, according to the study. Next, the researchers plan to test oleuropein in animal models of diabetes, while also exploring its potential benefits related to metabolism and aging. "We believe it will not only contribute to the biochemistry of the functions of the olive component oleuropein, but also have an impact on the general public to pay more attention to olive products in light of the current diabetes epidemic, Dr Xu c Continue reading >>

Add Extra Virgin Olive Oil To Reduce After-meal Blood Sugar Levels

Add Extra Virgin Olive Oil To Reduce After-meal Blood Sugar Levels

When it comes to controlling blood sugars, individuals generally turn to carbohydrate intake for fluctuating levels. So how may extra virgin olive oil, a fat source, reduce after-meal blood sugars? Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects nearly 10 percent of Americans, with that number expected to grow in the future. The condition cannot only be costly to the wallet, but taxing on health and should not be taken lightly. Essentially, diabetes is when the body cannot efficiently produce energy from food sources. Insulin, a hormone responsible for making energy from sugar (mostly from carbohydrate sources) becomes insufficient in diabetes. The conversion of sugar to energy is unable to be carried out and blood sugars start to rise, a phenomenon known as hyperglycemia, and can harm multiple organ systems if left uncontrolled. But when it comes to controlling blood sugars, individuals generally turn to carbohydrate intake for fluctuating levels. So how may extra virgin olive oil, a fat source, reduce after-meal blood sugars? Olive Oil: What Is It? Running to the store for olive oil might be a little more overwhelming than envisioned, as there are numerous types - including pure olive oil, light olive oil, and virgin olive oil, and extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Although each can be used interchangeably, EVOO is the highest quality offered. Extra virgin olive oil and virgin olive oil are unrefined, meaning they have not been treated with chemicals or undergone heat manipulation. When it comes to distinguishing between the two, the finger is pointed to the oleic acid content. Though oleic acid can be consumed at a healthy and safe level, too much can be harmful. EVOO, compared to the others, has the least amount of oleic acid content (with no more than one percent) while of Continue reading >>

Cooking Oils

Cooking Oils

Fat plays many important roles in a healthful diet. It provides energy and essential fatty acids, which are necessary for good health. It helps to maintain healthy skin and to regulate cholesterol metabolism, and it contributes to substances in the body called prostaglandins, which regulate other body processes. Dietary fat aids in the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, and it helps to satisfy the appetite by making you feel full after eating. Despite all the important functions of fat, there is clear evidence that a diet that is too high in fat can contribute to many health problems, including some types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. High intakes of saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol increase the risk of unhealthy blood fat levels. In general, a healthy amount of fat in the diet ranges between 20% and 35% of total calories. Consuming more than 35% of total calories as fat can lead to a high intake of saturated fat and can also make it difficult to keep calorie intake at a desirable level. Types of dietary fat Being selective about the types of fat you eat is important for your heart health. Saturated fat and trans fat raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood, which raises the risk of developing heart disease. Trans fat additionally decreases high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol levels. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) latest nutrition recommendations advise getting less than 7% of calories from saturated fat and minimizing intake of trans fat. For a person who consumes 1500 calories per day, 7% of calories from saturated fat is less than 12 grams of saturated fat per day. (When converting grams of fat into calories, remember that each gram of fat conta Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading health problems in the developed countries, and the sixth cause of death. It is one of the major metabolic diseases and it is potentially very serious because it can cause many complications that seriously damage health, such as cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, blindness, peripheral circulation disorders, etc. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: type-I or insulin-dependent diabetes, found in children and teenagers, and type-II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, which appears in adulthood, generally from the age of 40 onwards. Insulin is required to control the first type while the second, more frequent type is generally associated with obesity and does not call for insulin treatment. Nowadays a person is considered to be a diabetic when, two hours after an oral overdose of glucose, he or she has a fasting blood sugar level of more than 126 mg/dl, or of more than 200 mg/dl in non-fasting conditions. Glucose intolerance is a situation where a person has high blood sugar levels (between 110 and 125 mg/dl) without any clear signs of disease, but with a major risk of suffering from diabetes in the future. OLIVE OIL AND DIABETES An olive-oil-rich diet is not only a good alternative in the treatment of diabetes; it may also help to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. How it does so is by preventing insulin resistance and its possible pernicious implications by raising HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides, and ensuring better blood sugar level control and lower blood pressure. It has been demonstrated that a diet that is rich in olive oil, low in saturated fats, moderately rich in carbohydrates and soluble fibre from fruit, vegetables, pulses and grains is the most effective approach for diabetics Continue reading >>

Diabetes Benefits From Olive Oil | Howstuffworks

Diabetes Benefits From Olive Oil | Howstuffworks

People living with diabetes have to work hard to keep their blood sugar, also called blood glucose, levels under control. One way to do so is to eat a diet that is fairly low in carbohydrates. Because people with diabetes are also at an elevated risk of developing heart disease, they are advised to limit their intake of dietary fat. People with diabetes must keep constant watch on their blood sugar level. Lately, researchers and nutritionists have been debating the best type of eating pattern for people with diabetes. Some research indicates that a diet high in monounsaturated fat may be better than a low-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. Polyphenols are advantageous not only to human health but also to the health of the olive. Phenolic compounds protect the olive, prevent oxidation of its oil, and allow it to stay in good condition longer. In addition, they increase the shelf life of olive oil and contribute to its tart flavor. Numerous studies have suggested that people with diabetes who consume a diet high in monounsaturated fat have the same level of control over blood sugar levels as those who eat a low-fat diabetic diet. But monounsaturated fat also helps keep triglyceride levels in check, reduce LDL cholesterol levels, and increase HDL cholesterol levels. Researchers in Spain published an article in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in September 2003 that concluded calorie-controlled diabetic diets high in monounsaturated fat do not cause weight gain and are more pleasing to eat than low-fat diets. The researchers determined that a diet high in monounsaturated fat is a good idea for people with diabetes. Research is still inconsistent as to whether monounsaturated fat actually plays a role in stabilizing blood glucose levels, but evidence is leaning in that d Continue reading >>

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Lowers Blood Glucose And Cholesterol, Study Finds

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Lowers Blood Glucose And Cholesterol, Study Finds

Extra virgin olive oil lowers blood glucose and cholesterol, study finds Extra virgin olive oil lowers blood glucose and cholesterol, study finds Tax sugary drinks to tackle type 2 diabetes, urges Canadian Diabetes Association 08 September 2015 Extra virgin olive oil reduces blood sugar and cholesterol more than other kinds of fats , according to new research. The study, conducted at Sapienza University in Rome, could explain the health benefits associated with a traditional Mediterranean diet for people with diabetes. "Lowering blood glucose and cholesterol may be useful to reduce the negative effects of glucose and cholesterol on the cardiovascular system," said Francesco Violo, lead author of the study. This was a small study involving only 25 participants, all of whom ate a typical Mediterranean lunch - consisting primarily of fruits , vegetables , grains and fish - on two separate occasions. For the first meal, they added 10g of extra virgin olive oil. For the second, they added 10g of corn oil. After each meal, the participants blood glucose levels were tested. The rise in blood sugar levels was much smaller after the meal with extra virgin olive oil than after the meal with corn oil. The findings were consistent with previous studies, which have linked extra virgin olive oil to higher levels of insulin , making it beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes. More surprising, however, were the reduced levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, associated with the extra virgin olive oil meal. The study's findings are interesting but preliminary. Further studies are needed to confirm them. The study did not examine whether corn oil was worse or better than having no oil at all, for example. Despite its flaws, the study is one of the first to link Continue reading >>

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response in Type 1 Diabetes Encouraging results for fending off type 2 diabetes, too With commentary by lead study author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. Adding olive oil to a meal improves glucose response in those with type 1 diabetes, researchers in Italy have found. Olive oil may slow blood sugar rise following a high-glycemic meal in those with type 1 diabetes. Our study shows for the first time that the type of fat significantly influences post-prandial glycemic response in patients with type 1 diabetes, said lead author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. In short, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is better than butter. Study subjects who consumed meals with 37 grams of EVOO (2.5 tablespoons) showed an approximate 50% reduction in early, after-meal blood glucose response compared with those who consumed meals with either 43 grams of butter (2.9 tablespoons) or meals deemed low-fat (half-a-tablespoon of EVOO). The EVOO meals were also associated with a significant delay in the time it took for blood glucose to peak compared with the butter and low-fat meals. The EVOO benefit was seen only in meals with a high glycemic index (HGI); it did not apply to meals with a low glycemic index (LGI). HGI foods cause a rapid rise in after-meal blood glucose levels, while LGI foods result in a slower and steadier release of glucose, which leads to healthier blood glucose readings. The study, which suggests that carbohydrate-counting alone may not result in optimal glucose control, has important clinical implications for those with type 1 diabetes, the authors wrote, because it demonstrates that the combination of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Olive Oil & Diabetes: Is Olive Oil Good For Diabetics?

Olive Oil & Diabetes: Is Olive Oil Good For Diabetics?

Olive Oil & Diabetes: Is Olive Oil Good for Diabetics? Olive Oil & Diabetes: Is Olive Oil Good for Diabetics? Diabetes, as we know, is today affecting a wide variety of population all across the globe. Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production of insulin by the pancreas or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body as it is the hormone insulin which is responsible for the breakdown of the carbohydrates and the other essential nutrients in the food to release the much-needed energy by the cells. This results in increasing the level of blood glucose which gives rise to several other complications including heart diseases, kidney problems, diabetic eye , diabetic foot , the problem of high blood pressure , nerve damage, and a host of other diseases and complications. A well maintained and regulated lifestyle, coupled with a healthy diet and physical exercise have always been recommended by the doctors. One such regulation is the inclusion of olive oil in the daily diet. Olive oil is rich in anti-oxidants, polyphenols, and some of the essential vitamins that make it a healthy food item, however, there are risks associated with it too as we shall discover in the article that follows. In this article, we try to explore more about Can Diabetics Eat Olive Oil. We shall delve deep into the subject of olive oil for diabeticsand analyze whether it is safe to consume olive oil by a patient who is suffering from diabetes or other related complications. Join in for the article and know the facts: How to Use Olive Oil to Better Manage Diabetes? Before we begin our discussion on the connection between diabetes and olive oil and how the consumption of this oil af Continue reading >>

The Extra Virgin Olive Oil Is Also A Cure For Diabetes

The Extra Virgin Olive Oil Is Also A Cure For Diabetes

The extra virgin olive oil is also a cure for diabetes An Italian study found that adding olive oil to foods reduces the glycemic index of meals, or wheelies post-prandial blood glucose, helping to protect against cardiovascular complications and microvascular diabetes The study evaluated whether fat quality, in the context of meals with high (HGI) or lowglycemic index (LGI), influences postprandial blood glucose (PPG) response in patients with type 1 diabetes. Current guidelines for the treatment of type 1 diabetes advised to calculate the units of insulin to be administered with meals, based on the carbohydrate content of the foods that will be eaten (the so-called 'count carbs'). However this system, despite the efforts made by patients, does not always prove effective in controlling blood glucose levels in an optimal way. And the reasons are many. The most important element, however, is the glycemic index of foods consumed and the fiber content of a particular food. The same group of researchers of the SID, the authors of the work published in Diabetes Care, in a previous study had shown that even in the post counts of carbohydrates a correction that takes into account the glycemic index of foods helps to improve glycemic control. But of course, to influence the absorption of carbohydrates also contribute other macronutrients that they become part of a meal, in particular proteins and fats. And 'ever more evident the role that dietary fats play in influencing blood sugar levels after a meal. In general the fats tend to delay the gastric emptying times and this should in theory result in an attenuation of the peak of postprandial glucose. E 'was also shown that the glycemic index of certain foods can be reduced after totalising with fat. According to a randomized cr Continue reading >>

Studies Explain How Olive Oil May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Studies Explain How Olive Oil May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

High fat foods and oils have been vilified as potential causes of obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease for decades. It’s only been within the last few years that nutrition experts began pushing the benefits of healthy fats, particularly olive oil, to Americans. The Health Benefits of Olive Oil Olive oil is a great source of healthy monounsaturated fats and polyphenols (plant-based micronutrients that are high in antioxidants). Studies suggest that adding olive oil to your diet can help slow the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. But it seems the greatest effect olive oil may have on our health is preventing and controlling type 2 diabetes. What compounds are in olive oil that make it so healthy? Are there other foods comprised of similar compounds? A study recently published in Biochemistry is getting closer to an answer. Olives contain oleuropein, a compound that signals the pancreas to release insulin, helping regulate your blood sugar levels and metabolism, according to Virginia Tech researchers. Oleuropein also detoxifies amylin, a compound that when over-produced becomes harmful, often causing a build-up of protein aggregates in the pancreas. Green olives, black olives and olive oil seem to be the only dietary sources of oleuropein. However, a significant amount of oleuropein is removed from olives during processing. When olives are harvested their natural flavor is so bitter and astringent they’re rendered inedible. This biting taste is from the oleuropein. The traditional method of dulling the taste of olives is heavily seasoning them with spices and salt. Unfortunately, the process takes months. That’s why modern growers opt for soaking olives in lye, followed by bathing them in water. While this so Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Olive oil is a staple of the highly recommended Mediterranean diet. Since the Mediterranean diet is so highly recommended, everyone should go right to their neighborhood grocery store and use olive oil for cooking. Simple, right? Well, in one sense, yes…but is anything ever really that simple? Nutritional Facts about Olive Oil 1 tablespoon of olive oil contains 14 grams of total fat, 2 grams of saturated fats, no fiber, no sugar, no cholesterol and no fiber. It is a good source of Vitamins E and K and no protein—so all the calories come from fats.[1] So far, nothing to get excited overly excited about, is there? What makes olive oil so good to use is the types of fat it contains. It contains 1318 mg of omega-6 fats and 103mg of omega-3 fats. In addition, it contains over 10 grams of either mono- or poly-unsaturated fats—the healthier types of fats. Olive oil also has almost 30 g of phytosterols, a type of plant substance that is chemically similar to cholesterol but helps maintain heart health because it inhibits the absorption of cholesterol from food and lowers the amount of LDL cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol that is associated with heart disease.[2] Finally, olive oil is rich in antioxidants such as oleocanthal and oleeuropein—those plant substances that can help reduce the oxidative damage caused to our bodies by high levels of blood sugar. What is the Best Form of Olive Oil? It does get upsetting, but the fact is that there are lots of people out there making and selling olive oil with less than 100% olive oil! Olive oil has become so popular, there are many forms of olive oil that are not pure olive oil. So the first thing to do is to buy reputable, well- known brands of olive oil and only buy 100% olive oil—extra virgin olive oil is pressed—it Continue reading >>

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