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Is Nyquil Bad For Diabetics?

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A Common Over-the-counter Cough Suppressant Can Boost Insulin

Dextromethorphan (DXM) is a cough suppressant found in Vick's NyQuil Cold & Flu Relief, Triaminic Multi-Symptom Fever, Dimetapp Children's Multi-Symptom Cold & Flu, Tylenol Cold Multi-Symptom Nighttime, and similar over-the-counter cold medicines that make life so much more bearable when you're coughing your lungs out. It's not good for everyone though; the American Academy of Pediatricians has recommended that it not be given to children under the age of four, because it is completely ineffective for them and may even cause them harm. But although it may be bad for kids, it may be good for type 2 diabetics; a recent report in Nature Medicine suggests that it increases glucose tolerance and does so in a way that is more effective than existing drugs. Antidiabetic drugs currently on the market increase what's called the basal levels of insulin secretion—it goes up all the time, whether it's needed or not. This basal insulin secretion is a major cause of lethal hypoglycemia in the patients who take these drugs. New types of drugs that only boost insulin in response to glucose are thus highly desirable. To do that, we need to be able to manipulate the pancreas. It's a somewhat unusu Continue reading >>

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  1. jusrelaxin

    Sooooo.........Im sick! haha and it sucks and I cant sleep at night and my throat is killing me.I know before having the big D that nyquil and dayquil worked soooo great for me. Now I want to take it now...does anyone know if it has any affect on my blood sugar? high or low.Does anyone have experience? Thanks guys!

  2. AngelKitty

    Hi Amber, sorry to hear you're not feeling well.
    Check your medicine to see if it's sugar free (or has no added sugar on the label).
    You can also get throat lozengers that are sugar free for your sore throat.
    If there's no sugar it should not affect your blood sugar readings. However, being sick can elevate your blood sugars.
    Keep drinking lots of fluids and checking your BGLs every two hours.
    Hope you feel better soon

  3. jillrapp

    I think the gelcaps are sugar free, the liquid does have sugar though

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Watch exclusive conversation with Kiran Mazumdar Shaw, CMD of Biocon & S Srinivasan of All India Drug Action Network on how will Medical Council Of India's guidelines impact the pharma cos & pharmacies.

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these m Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. jusrelaxin

    Sooooo.........Im sick! haha and it sucks and I cant sleep at night and my throat is killing me.I know before having the big D that nyquil and dayquil worked soooo great for me. Now I want to take it now...does anyone know if it has any affect on my blood sugar? high or low.Does anyone have experience? Thanks guys!

  2. AngelKitty

    Hi Amber, sorry to hear you're not feeling well.
    Check your medicine to see if it's sugar free (or has no added sugar on the label).
    You can also get throat lozengers that are sugar free for your sore throat.
    If there's no sugar it should not affect your blood sugar readings. However, being sick can elevate your blood sugars.
    Keep drinking lots of fluids and checking your BGLs every two hours.
    Hope you feel better soon

  3. jillrapp

    I think the gelcaps are sugar free, the liquid does have sugar though

  4. -> Continue reading
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How To Treat Cold Sores | How To Stop Getting Cold Sores | How To Prevent A Cold Sore When You Feel It Coming | Cold Sore Treatments Hey guys! This weeks video is about cold sores, how to prevent them and how to try and treat them. I couldn't find any information to clinically prove the effectiveness of some cold sore remedies seen online like distilled vinegar, witch hazel and alcohol, so I can't recommend them. But feel free to leave a comment if you've tried them to let us know how effective they were. WHAT ARE COLD SORES: About 1 in 5 people in the UK have recurring cold sores. Cold sores usually resolve on their own without treatment in 7-10 days. Cold sores, also known as fever blisters or oral herpes, are very common. They can be easy to recognise as they usually appear as red bumps or blisters around the lips and mouth. Cold sores are caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), the oral form of the virus. In fact, 67% of the world population under age 50 has HSV-1 because it is so contagious Once you are infected, the virus never leaves your body. Most people arent exactly sure when they first encountered the virus. Its usually contracted in early childhood where it may not appear as a visible cold sore. HOW DO COLD SORES SPREAD: The oral herpes virus is spread through direct skin-to-skin contact. It is even contagious when you cant see a cold sore. Most people first contract the cold sore virus (HSV-1) when they are very young, usually by skin-to-skin contact with an adult carrying the virus. The virus can spread in various ways: through kissing, or by sharing objects like toothbrushes, water bottles, drinking glasses, and silverware. It is also possible to spread the virus from the mouth to the genitals, eyes, and other parts of the body. COLD SORE TRIGGERS WHICH MAY BE PREVENTED: Not everyones cold sores are triggered by the same thing, but these triggers are the ones which could be avoided to prevent a cold sore attack. Stress can wear down your immune system, giving that dormant cold sore a chance to launch a sneak attack. Instead, when you feel stressed, breathe deeply and relax. Heres a look at some relaxation techniques that can help you take it easy -https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-... Being tired can make you vulnerable to cold sores. Like stress and illness, fatigue can zap your immune system, making you easy prey for a cold sore outbreak. Getting rest is key. Link to my video to help you get a better night sleep - https://youtu.be/m_ZHgD5rVPU If you find that sunlight triggers your cold sores, try using sunscreen lip balm (SPF 15 or more) before going out into bright sunlight. This has been found to prevent some bouts of cold sores in some people. Do not share lip balms with other people if you have cold sores. Prevent chapped lips in the cold by using a hydrating lip balm. COLD SORE TREATMENT: Aciclovir can be bought over-the-counter (OTC) at pharmacies. This does not kill the virus but prevents the virus from multiplying. It has little effect on existing blisters but may prevent them from becoming worse. The cream may provide some protection against cold sores caused by sunlight if it is used before exposure. If you use an antiviral cream as soon as symptoms start then the cold sore may not last as long as usual and may be less severe. There is debate as to how well the cream works. WHEN TO SEE YOUR GP: You should see your GP if you are unsure of the diagnosis, or if the cold sores are not resolving after a week or so. If you have a poor immune system (you are an immunocompromised person) and develop possible cold sores, you should see your GP. You may need tests to confirm the virus, and/or oral antiviral medicines. For full list please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cold-so... Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharma... https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamTh... https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449... https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

Are Over-the-counter Cold Remedies Safe For People Who Have High Blood Pressure?

Over-the-counter cold remedies aren't off-limits if you have high blood pressure, but it's important to make careful choices. Among over-the-counter cold remedies, decongestants cause the most concern for people who have high blood pressure. Decongestants relieve nasal stuffiness by narrowing blood vessels and reducing swelling in the nose. This narrowing can affect other blood vessels as well, which can increase blood pressure. To keep your blood pressure in check, avoid over-the-counter decongestants and multisymptom cold remedies that contain decongestants — such as pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline. Instead: Choose a cold medication designed for people who have high blood pressure. Some cold medications, such as Coricidin HBP, don't contain decongestants. However, these medications may contain other powerful drugs, such as dextromethorphan, that can be dangerous if you take too much. Follow the dosing instructions carefully. Take a pain reliever. To relieve a fever, sore throat or headache or body aches, try aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use saline nasal spray. To relieve nasal congestion, try saline nasal spray. The spray Continue reading >>

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  1. muffnette

    I pretty much know the answer.. however I was looking for opinions and that from you guys... when I get a cold I know the congestion I get makes me SOOOOOOO miserable.. and prior to becoming diabetic I would take sudafed or some other decongestant no problem (was not diabetic at the time) and they worked wonders for relief.. however obviously I am now more aware of reading instructions and notice all decongestants have the diabetic warning that it should be avoided by diabetics.. does anyone really know the exact reason why? I have asked pharmacists before and all they say is "diabetics need to watch it" and "it is trial and error" and that is about it. It is nice that they have diabetic cough syrups out there that takes care of the coughs but what are you suppose to do for the congestion (aside from other remedies like steam, vapor rub, etc.) it kind of stinks that there are so many things we always have to avoid ... I mean we are miserable enough to deal w/the disease that to even get something else (like a cold) and have to suffer even more because you can't take any treatments for it is so mean! lol.... if anyone can find an answer or let me know what your doctors have told you I would appreciate it... (I will ask my dr. next time i go in)
    Karen

  2. Wiglafman

    When I asked my Doctor the same question early on in my diabetes, he said it varied from person to person and that they had to put the warnings on the medicine to cover their butts. Apparently some medication are more likely to produce a mild interaction than others, just as some Type II medicines can cause low blood sugar, dizziness, etc., awhiile others don't. I think everyone's answer to this will be vague because there isn't a "right" answer. I am a 54 year old male who had had Type II for 6 years. Although I don't take many other medicines (and never did)I haven't ever had any reactions to Sudafed, Sufedrine, Nyquil, Contact, Tylenol PM, or aspirin. I take Glucophage (2/day), Avandia (2/day) and Precose (3/day w, meals). I also take Lipitor and daily muulti-vitamins and aspirin. I hope this helps a little bit.

  3. wambo

    The following information was extracted from the Ask the Diabetes Team website. You should check the labels of all of your medications to identify any problems with decongestants.
    wambo
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Question:
    From Houston, Texas, USA:
    I have Type 1 diabetes and am aware of the many warnings placed on over the counter drugs (such as decongestants). Could you explain what effects the medications have on blood glucose, and if you are familiar with any types of related cold medicines which do not, or have a lesser effect on blood glucose than the more common medications? For those with Type 2, could the warnings also be placed there because of drug interactions?
    Answer:
    This question was referred to several members of the Diabetes Team, who have each given an answer:
    Answer from Dr. O'Brien:
    As you say, many Over The Counter (OTC) decongestants and cough medicines have a base that may contain glucose, sucrose or corn syrup. Many tablets use lactose as an excipient and of course some pediatric medicines are made palatable with a syrup; some also contain alcohol. The amount of carbohydrate added with a usual dose is too small to affect diabetic control to a significant degree.
    Most pharmacists have lists of cough and cold preparations that are sugar and decongestant free and have minimal alcohol content. Sosufree Cough Mixture has no decongestant, no sugar and no alcohol. Spen-cold Pediatric Cough Syrup contains a decongestant; but no alcohol or sugar and there are many more.
    In general the active ingredients of these products have little effect on glucose metabolism although phenylephrine and other ephedrine derivatives are usually quoted as possibly raising blood sugars and aspirin as lowering blood sugar. In any case the stress of the underlying condition is likely to have much more effect on blood sugar than the medication.
    Some OTC medications have advice to diabetics on the label. This is due to the sugar content of the product; but usual doses minimally distort diet patterns.
    DO'B
    Answer from Dr. Lebinger:
    Many cough and cold medicines contain decongestants that can increase the blood sugar and produce ketones independent of the sugar content. I usually advise patients that if they need a decongestant to use a nasal spray such as Afrin or phenylephrine that will relieve nasal congestion and have little effect on the blood sugar as opposed to an oral decongestant.
    Antihistamines, cough suppressants, and expectorants have little effect on blood sugar or ketone production. If you must use an oral decongestant, keep in mind that your blood sugar may even be higher than it would be from the illness itself alone, and you may need more extra insulin.
    TGL
    [Editor's comment: The same comments apply to Type 2 diabetes as well as to Type 1. Drug interactions would be some concern for anyone on other medications, but I think the points made above are extremely relevant for all people with diabetes who take OTC medications. WWQ]

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