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Is Mustard Bad For Diabetics

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

You don't have to avoid this sweet nectar even if you have diabetes. Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Honey is a safer sweetener than sugar because it has a lower glycemic index. However, honey still contains carbohydrate, so it is important for diabetics to track the intake of honey just like sugar. Shes as sweet as Tupelo honey, a line from Van Morrisons song is one of many that refers to the sweet nectar that is honey. Some call honey a miracle food because of the many other properties it has besides just being a sweetener. Honey has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (the darker the honey, the more antioxidants), as well as trace minerals of B-vitamins and Vitamin C. And for centuries, honey has been used as an anti-microbial agent to treat cuts, wounds, acne, and other skin ailments. Honey is a sweetener , somewhat comparable to table sugar. Both honey and sugar contain carbohydrate. It is the arrangement of the carbohydrate molecules glucose and fructose that make sugar and honey a little different from each other, however. Honey has a lower glycemic index than sugar (55 compared to 65, respectively), so eating honey may result in a more modest increase in blood glucose than when consuming sugar. When counting carbohydrates, it is important to know that 1 tablespoon of honey is considered one serving of honey, or 15 grams of carbohydrate. It is also important to note that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the American Heart Association have both issued the recommendation to reduce intake of added sugars, which would include both sugar and honey. But reducing intake does n Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Mustard Lowers Blood Sugar

Cinnamon And Mustard Lowers Blood Sugar

Q. I am a nurse, and one of my patients has a success story that may interest you. His presurgical tests showed an HbA1c above 8, indicating that his blood sugar had been above normal for months. He decided to start taking a cinnamon supplement. When I saw him two months later, his HbA1c was 6.0. Wow! Hes also been taking a teaspoon of yellow mustard, which contains vinegar and turmeric, after every meal. It muddies the research, but it has been good for him. A. Thanks so much for sharing this story. HbA1c is a blood test that reveals long-term blood sugar control. Keeping the level below 7 is considered desirable. Not everyone benefits from cinnamon, but we have heard from readers that a supplement can be helpful. There is even some research to support this approach (Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, May, 2010). Both vinegar and turmeric can help reduce the rise in blood sugar after eating, so were not surprised that mustard might be beneficial too. Get The Graedons' Favorite Home Remedies Health Guide for FREE Join our daily email newsletter with breaking health news, prescription drug information, home remedies AND you'll get a copy of our brand new full-length health guide for FREE! How much balsamic should be taken for lowering sugar levels? My sugar is always up. I take metformin 500 mg in the morning and afternoon and in between I take Gymnema Syvestre tablet once a day. My readings are between 6 & 7 I have slightly elevated sugar. Is there any advice one what foods to avoid? I dont want to takeep medicine to control. Remember that cinnamon raises blood pressure, even though it helps with blood sugar. You really have to know how to take spices. Sorry dont want to take medicine to control. How do I get bitter melon in Umuahia Abia State Nigeria? I just Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Mayonnaise If You Have Diabetes

Should You Eat Mayonnaise If You Have Diabetes

If you are someone with diabetes you are aware that is very difficult to pick the right foods in order to control your levels of blood sugar. Probably already you made tons of changes in terms of your usual diet. And you are probably wondering if you also need to eliminate mayonnaise. The mayonnaise is usually used as a base for dips, as spread on sandwiches and also in salad dressings. The mayonnaise belongs in the category of oils and fats. According to the National Nutrient Database USDA, one tablespoon of mayonnaise contains around 11.7 grams of fat and around 103 calories, but it does not contain carbs or protein. After a meal, the carbs influence the levels of your blood sugar directly. The regular mayonnaise won’t increase the levels of your blood sugar. And therefore it won’t interfere with the control over your diabetes. But bear in mind that the food you consume along with mayonnaise like French fries, potato salad or a regular sandwich can influence the levels of the blood sugar. On the market, there are fat-free, low-fat and reduced-calorie mayonnaise that is made to reduce its content of fat. However, in order to compensate for their lack of taste, in these types of mayonnaises, there are small amounts of sugar. To be more accurate, for example, 1 tablespoon of mayonnaise that is reduced in calories contains around 49 calories, 1 gram carbs, and 4.9 grams fat. You will get half of the fat and calories, but also there are carbs added. At first glance, it might not seem like a lot, but many people use light or low-fat products, and these people usually end up having more than they would with regular products. For instance, certain people might put 4 tablespoons in their salad or sandwich, and that is 4 grams of carbs, enough to be part of dietary carb th Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Healthy Tips For Hot Dogs And Hamburgers

Healthy Tips For Hot Dogs And Hamburgers

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition Yes, you can eat hot dogs and hamburgers on your diabetic diet. Just follow a few tips and tricks, and start enjoying these barbecue favorites guilt-free. By Hope S. Warshaw, R.D., CDE; Photos by Scott Little During the warmer months, your social calendar is likely to be sprinkled with cookouts, visits to street fairs, or pool parties where the grill is a-sizzle. And the main course, of course, is hot dogs, sausages, or hamburgers. "Nothing tastes better than a hot dog downed during an inning of baseball or a brat at the Polish polka festival," says Patti Urbanski, M.Ed., R.D., CDE, a dietitian and diabetes educator at the Duluth Family Practice Center in Minnesota who also has type 1 diabetes. Fortunately, you can relish these rituals without ruining your diabetes meal plan. Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Portion Control Hamburger meat, by government standards, is fresh or frozen ground beef without anything else added and can contain no more than 30 percent fat by weight. At the supermarket, hamburger meat is labeled with its percentage of lean meat and percentage of fat, such as 80/20 or 93/7. Not so at a friend's barbecue or a ballpark grill. Here are some good rules of thumb: -- A 3-ounce serving of cooked meat is just right -- there's no need to pile on extra patties or order a large burger unless you share. -- Get your hamburgers cooked how you like them (as long as the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees F for safety) because the fat content doesn't differ much based on doneness. -- Spread condiments gingerly, but feel free to use a generous amount of this low-calorie flavor enhancer: mustard. Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition , Portion Control Today's Continue reading >>

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

12 Powerfoods To Beat Diabetes

Can controlling your blood sugar and preventing diabetes complications be as simple as eating the right foods? Yes. Certain foods are packed with nutrients that stabilize blood sugar levels, protect your heart, and even save your vision from the damaging effects of diabetes. These 12 foods can give you an extra edge against diabetes and its complications. In a Finnish study, men who ate the most apples and other foods high in quercetin had 20 percent less diabetes and heart disease deaths. Other good sources of quercetin are onions, tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, and berries. A study at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland, found that if you use teaspoon of cinnamon daily, it can make cells more sensitive to insulin. Therefore, the study says, the cells convert blood sugar to energy. After 40 days of taking various amount of cinnamon extract, diabetics experienced not only lower blood sugar spikes after eating, but major improvements in signs of heart health. And you can sprinkle cinnamon on just about anything. Studies show that people with diabetes tend to have lower levels of vitamin C in their bodies, so antioxidant-packed citrus fruit is a great snack choice. It may seem quicker to get your C from a pill, but since fruit is low in fat, high in fiber, and delivers lots of other healthy nutrients, it's a better choice. Heart disease strikes people with diabetes twice as often as it does people without the illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acidsthe "good fat" in cold-water fish such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and Atlantic mackerelcan help lower artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while raising levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. A study at the University of Texas Southwest Continue reading >>

Mayonnaise And Diabetes

Mayonnaise And Diabetes

If you have diabetes, choosing the right foods to control your blood sugar levels is not always easy to do. You might have made a lot of changes to your diet already and now wonder if you also have to eliminate other foods, such as mayonnaise, to optimize your blood sugar control. Mayonnaise is commonly used as a spread on sandwiches, to prepare salads or as a base for dips. Video of the Day Mayonnaise and Diabetes Mayonnaise falls in the category of fats and oils, and contains almost no carbohydrates; 1 tbsp. of regular mayonnaise contains 103 calories and 11.7 g of fat, but no protein or carbohydrates, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database. Because only carbs can directly influence your blood sugar levels after a meal, regular mayonnaise does not boost your blood sugar levels and therefore does not interfere with your diabetes control. However, the foods you eat your mayonnaise with, such as potato salad, a sandwich or french fries, can definitely influence your blood sugar levels. Reduced-Calorie Mayonnaise Some reduced-calorie, low-fat or fat-free mayonnaises are manufactured to decrease their fat content, but to compensate for the lack of taste, small amounts of sugar are often added. For example, 1 tbsp. of reduced-calorie mayonnaise contains 49 calories, 4.9 g of fat and 1 g of carbs. In the same serving, you get half the calories and fat, but with carbs added. It might not seem like a lot, but many people using low-fat or light products end up using more. For example, some people might use up to 4 tbsp. in their sandwiches or salad, which adds up to 4 g of carbs, enough to include in dietary carb counting for diabetics. The types of fats found in mayonnaises vary according to the type of oil used. Most mayonnaises are made with soybean oil, which is r Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

From the day you are diagnosed with diabetes, type 1 or type 2, everyone around you is going start telling you what you can and cannot eat. Your doctor, friends, brother, mother, father, uncle, children, spouse, and even the television and every magazine and newspaper! (Be wary of the all the diet fads that will not be directed right at you!) By the time you’ve heard it all, you might feel like there’s nothing you’re allowed to eat except for steamed chicken and spinach. Here are three secrets for your life with diabetes around food: Despite what everyone is saying you “can’t” and “shouldn’t” eat, you are the one who puts the food in your mouth…which means you actually can eat anything, in a sense. It is your choice, and while we all would be better if we always chose the healthiest foods, try reminding yourself of this statement: “I can choose to eat whatever I want.” Thinking this way around your choices versus feeling like you aren’t allowed to eat practically anything can be a very helpful tool for feeling more empowered around food. No one can control what you eat except for you. It’s your choice. As people with diabetes, we do want to aim for 70 to 90 percent of the day’s choices to be very healthy, moderate to low in carbohydrates, and whole food choices, but you do not have to be perfect! Enjoying a treat (whether it’s potato chips or chocolate) in moderation is possible, but the key is moderation. Sometimes, putting too many rules around those treats can make us want more and more of them, which is why the way you think about food is going to very important for how you behave around food. Think about the treats you love the most and how to incorporate them carefully and in sensible portions in your week’s nutrition. Never stop Continue reading >>

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

1 / 11 Use Portion Control Enhancing your food's flavors through condiments and spices is key to enjoying a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. But before you reach for the ketchup and mayo, know that some choices are a lot better for you than others. You'll also benefit from learning how to read nutrition labels and measuring servings carefully. "Most important is portion control," says Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes. "Condiments should be used to enhance the flavor of food and not serve as the main course." Here are the facts on the most popular condiments and spices to help you choose. Continue reading >>

Mustard Oil Recommended For Diabetics

Mustard Oil Recommended For Diabetics

Over a decade and half ago, a handful of Diabetologists including this columnist launched a countrywide determined campaign against widespread use of refined oils which were being misguidedly promoted across the length and breadth of the Indian peninsula by self-seeking trio of profit-mongering manufacturers, mutually vying media channels and gullible medical practitioners. There was, then, quite a formidable opposition from protagonists advocating use of these socalled refined oils. Nevertheless, the clock has turned a full circle. And, today, the vindication comes from some of the worlds highest medical authorities which outrightly endorse the concept favouring the use of Indian ethnic edible oils, notably the mustard oil. In general and more so for Diabetics, mustard oil and not the socalled refined oil is the right choice for maintaining an optimum ratio of different fats in the diet. Unfortunately, however, inspite of its Indian ethnic connection, mustard oil is not so widely used for cooking in India and much less so in South India. In the realms of Modern Malnutrition, the term Fat Toxicity has been coined to describe faulty dietary intake of fats and the consequent hazards. It is to be noted that no drug therapy or medication can fully correct the ill-effects of high fat and refined cereal diets. This has inspired researchers in the fields of Nutrition and Diabetology to reevaluate concepts relating to dietary fats. The earlier concepts were based mostly on the information available way back in the 1960s when a lot many things were not fully understood. For example, at that time, there was hardly any information available regarding qualitative aspects of fats. Refined oils which were popularised since 1968 and during the decades that followed ended up causing m Continue reading >>

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat

Foods Diabetics Should Never Eat

Slide 1 of 15: “Diabetes is all about carbs,” Deborah Malkoff-Cohen, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, says. No medical prescription can fix a bad diet. The condition requires daily maintenance – monitoring blood sugar levels, eating healthy and exercising are crucial. Managing your weight is a lot more serious than simply looking and feeling good. Watching your diet can be a matter of life and death. Continue reading >>

People’s Pharmacy: Cinnamon, Mustard May Lower Blood Sugar

People’s Pharmacy: Cinnamon, Mustard May Lower Blood Sugar

Q. I have been using cinnamon to help control my blood sugar for the past four years. Using 1/4 teaspoon in boiling water to make a cinnamon tea lowers my blood-sugar readings from about 185 to 135 in one hour. Yellow mustard works even more effectively. I take about 1/2 teaspoon per meal, depending on the amount of carbohydrates in the food. Both cinnamon and yellow mustard can be overdone and make blood sugar go too low, so you have to be cautious. A. There is research supporting the idea that cinnamon can lower blood sugar. Until your e-mail, we had not heard that yellow mustard could do the same thing. A little digging revealed several animal studies showing that curcumin, the active ingredient in the yellow spice turmeric, lowers blood glucose. Since turmeric gives mustard its yellow color, perhaps this explains the benefit you have discovered. Diabetics must monitor blood sugar closely and check with a physician before trying such dietary strategies. Q. After I read about Listerine for scalp problems, I tried it myself. I had been using a prescription steroid lotion for 10 years, but applying Listerine and letting it dry did the trick. This worked so well I bathed my dog with it. He’d been suffering with staph infections for years and had been on and off antibiotics and steroids for his skin problems. Letting the Listerine dry on him gave him immediate relief. It even healed two open wounds on his hind legs from biting and scratching. Thanks! A. We urge folks to check with a vet before trying out remedies on pets. In this case, though, we first heard about using Listerine for itchy scalp from a fellow who had been told to use it for hot spots on his dog. Q. Could you tell me if some sugar-free foods would be the cause of diarrhea? A. Absolutely. Sweeteners such Continue reading >>

Eat To Beat Diabetes

Eat To Beat Diabetes

When you consider that "glucose-intolerant" is another term for "diabetic," it's easy to see what you shouldn't eat. Namely, glucose-rich foods, such as bread, rice, pasta, and potatoes. But Mary Vernon, M.D., prefers a more positive approach: "I like to emphasize what people can enjoy." So, use the guidelines below to build a prescription diet. One caution: If you're currently taking medication for high blood pressure or high blood sugar, consult your physician first, as this diet will cause both to drop. Eat until you're satisfied, not stuffed. Don't skip meals, especially breakfast. Include protein, such as meat, cheese, and nuts, with every meal and snack. Vegetables: Down as many as four servings a day of nonroot vegetables. That means broccoli, asparagus, spinach, and any other leafy green vegetable. One serving is 1 cup rawabout the size of a baseballor 1/2 cup cooked (half a ball). Meat and eggs: Eat as much of these foodswhich include poultry and fishas you want (i.e., until you're full). Cheese: Have up to 4 ounces of hard and firm cheeses dailyfor instance, Parmesan, American, and cheddar. One serving is about the size of two dominoes. Fruit: Limit yourself to 1 cup of berries or melon a day. Condiments: Mustard, horseradish, soy sauce, and Tabasco sauce. Salad dressings: Oil and vinegar, and full-fat dressingssuch as ranchthat contain no more than 2 grams of carbohydrates per serving. Oils: Olive and canola are best; use only small amounts of other oils. Beverages: Drink 64 ounces of water a day. Then consume only two servings of diet soda per day and unsweetened tea and coffee as desired (decaf when possible). Continue reading >>

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