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Is Mussels Good For Diabetics

Diabetes And Healthy Food Choices

Diabetes And Healthy Food Choices

Eating healthy food is an important part of self-managing diabetes 2 Contents page 3 Diabetes and healthy food choices 4 Non-starchy vegetables 6 Carbohydrate 7 Carbohydrate: Fruit 8 Carbohydrate: Starchy vegetables 8 Carbohydrate: Milk and yoghurt 9 Carbohydrate: Breads and cereals 9 Carbohydrate: Rice and pasta 10 Carbohydrate: Legumes 10 Carbohydrate: Sugar 11 Protein: meat, chicken, fish, eggs and cheese 12 Fats and Oils 13 Salt 14 Drinks 15 Alcohol 15 Sweeteners 16 Stop eating 17 Biscuits, crackers and cakes 17 Jams, spreads, dressings, dips, sauces and pickles 18 Snacks 18 Ideas for taking a plate 19 Sample meals 20 Food guidelines summary 22 Food labels This pamphlet has been developed by New Zealand Registered Dietitian Alison Pask to provide some basic guidelines for people with diabetes. These may be adapted by your health professional to suit your individual needs. The information is general and is not designed to replace advice given to you by your own dietitian or other health professional. Vegetable photos courtesy of www.vegetables.co.nz 3 Stop eating these foods Eat some but not too much of these foods Eat lots of these foods Diabetes and healthy food choices Other vegetables broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce, tomato, carrots, peas… Pr ot ein Carbohydrate meat or chicken or fish or eggs… potato or kumara or pasta or rice or taro… ©Diabetes New Zealand Inc. 2007 Diabetes New Zealand Healthy Plate The whole family can eat the same healthy foods Diabetes New Zealand Healthy Eating Plan Your blood glucose levels are directly affected by the kind and amount of carbohydrate (starchy foods and sugar) you eat. Your risk of having a heart attack or stroke is affected by the kind and amount of fat you eat. People with diabetes do not nee Continue reading >>

Is Tilapia (the Fish) Safe For Diabetics? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

Is Tilapia (the Fish) Safe For Diabetics? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

It's easy to get answers about health and nutrition! Just send your question by email to [email protected] and Dr. Harlan will respond to selected questions of general interest. Answers will be posted in the Ask Dr. Gourmet newsletter ( sign up now!) and archived in the Ask Dr. Gourmet section of the website. Please note that the Ask Dr. Gourmet feature is restricted to questions regarding food and nutrition. Due to the many questions we receive, not all questions may be answered. For more specific questions about your individual health, please contact your doctor. About Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy I'd like to eat more fish but it can be expensive. Tilapia is pretty cheap - is it good for diabetics? Tilapia is a good selection of fish but I believe that it should not be your exclusive choice. There is a higher ratio of Omega-6 fatty acids to Omega-3 fatty acids in that variety of fish and that is OK - but not for every day. My recommendation for seafood is to consume a wide variety of fish and shellfish. Tilapia one day and then salmon the next, followed by shrimp, for example. There are so many great choices that you may not have to repeat yourself twice in a month, even if you ate fish every other day. Catfish, tuna, shrimp, mussels, cod, and drum are all pretty reasonably priced (comparatively speaking). For special occasions halibut, grouper, crab, and lobster are delicious but a little higher priced. By mixing it up you will get a wide variety of great nutrients. Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Are Mussels Healthy?

Are Mussels Healthy?

Sylvie Tremblay holds a Master of Science in molecular and cellular biology and has years of experience as a cancer researcher and neuroscientist. Based in Ontario, Canada, Tremblay is an experienced journalist and blogger specializing in nutrition, fitness, lifestyle, health and biotechnology, as well as real estate, agriculture and clean tech. Two bowls of cooked mussels.Photo Credit: Shaiith/iStock/Getty Images Mussels, a type of clam whose flesh has a mild, salty flavor, make for a decadent yet healthful addition to your diet. They're versatile in the kitchen, and they work well in salads, soups or as a topping for pasta. Mussels are low in mercury, making them safe for consumption by pregnant women and children, who are typically more sensitive to mercury. They can consume mussels and other low-mercury fish up to twice a week. Eating mussels also significantly boosts your nutrient intake, but they also contain sodium and cholesterol, which lowers their nutritional value. Each 6-ounce serving of steamed mussels -- the meat from approximately 20 mussels, according to Simply Seafood -- contains 292 calories, or approximately 15 percent of your daily allowance on a 2,000-calorie diet. Slightly more than half of these calories, or 55 percent, come from the 40.5 grams of protein in the mussels. Just one serving provides 72 percent of the recommended protein intake for men and 88 percent for women. Each 6-ounce serving of steamed mussels also contains 7.6 grams of fat, which accounts for 23 percent of the calorie content. Of this, just 1.4 grams come from harmful saturated fat. Mussels boast an impressive mineral content. Consuming 6 ounces of steamed mussels increases your selenium intake by 152.3 micrograms, while boosting your manganese intake by 11.6 milligrams. This Continue reading >>

Green Lipped Mussel Diabetes Remedy: Is It Worth A Try?

Green Lipped Mussel Diabetes Remedy: Is It Worth A Try?

Green Lipped Mussel Diabetes Remedy: Is It Worth a Try? Green Lipped Mussel Diabetes Remedy: Is It Worth a Try? If you're interested in a natural alternative to help try and control your diabetes, or have a high risk of developing the condition and want to do something to prevent it, the green lipped mussel diabetes remedy could be worth a try. It seems like an unlikely solution to this serious health issue though. But is it really? To find out, it's necessary to take a deeper look into diabetes and the causes. As we know, diabetes results in elevated blood sugar levels due to the inability of the body's insulin to sufficiently do its work. There are actually two types of diabetes. The rarer Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease whereby the body's immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. It usually developed early in age, and sufferers must inject insulin on a daily basis. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for around 95% of sufferers, is usually developed later in life by people who are obese. The pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin, and cells may also become resistant to what insulin there is in the body. Diet and lifestyle changes are often enough to control this type of diabetes. Thus, on the face of it, it doesn't look like either type of diabetes has much in common. However, scientists have discovered that the reality is different. The common factor, surprisingly, is inflammation. It's generally thought that all autoimmune diseases involve chronic inflammation. Normally, the body's immune system reacts when there has been some kind of damage in the body and produces acute inflammation. Chronic inflammation is where it goes into battle where there's nothing to defend against. One example, in the case of Type 1 diabetes, i Continue reading >>

Mussel Proteins Inspire New Diabetes Treatment

Mussel Proteins Inspire New Diabetes Treatment

Mussel proteins inspire new diabetes treatment Glue that sticks mussels to rocks inspired scientists to develop a new medical adhesive for an experimental diabetes treatment A natural glue that sticks mussels to rocks and boat hulls has inspired US scientists to develop a new type of medical adhesive for use in pancreatic islet transplantation, an experimental medical procedure for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. The glue, developed by Phillip Messersmiths team atNorthwesternUniversity inEvanston, consists of a branched poly(ethylene glycol) core with catechol-derived end groups. Speaking at the Materials Research Societys meeting inBoston last week, Messersmith explained that the catechol functional group plays a key role in the solidification and adhesive capabilities of the marine blue musselMytilus edulis adhesive proteins. Catechol in the presence of an oxidant transforms into a quinone that then reacts further, first to accomplish the solidification - the cross linking of the polymers - and then also at the interface to form covalent bonds with elements of the tissue. Islet transplantation is an experimental medical procedure involving infusing donor pancreatic cells through a catheter into a diabetes sufferers liver, where they become lodged in the blood vessels. Once immobilised the islets beta cells make and release insulin, allowing the patient to cease daily injections of the hormone. The problem [with the current procedure] is that the islets over a period of two or three years gradually become incapacitated, explains Messersmith. There is an interest in finding alternative locations within the body for transplanting islets. Catechol in the presence of an oxidant transforms into a quinone A huge hurdle to be overcome here is ensuring the cells stay Continue reading >>

Have Type 2 Diabetes? Here’s Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Have Type 2 Diabetes? Here’s Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Making lifestyle changes to help manage type 2 diabetes can sometimes be a challenge. It might entail getting more exercise, taking special medications, monitoring your blood glucose levels or entirely rethinking what you eat. Thankfully, that last bit isn’t too difficult. An easy way to take care of your health when you have type 2 diabetes is to include more seafood in your diet. The American Heart Association already suggests that everyone should be eating at least two servings of seafood a week. But diabetics may benefit more than others from having more fish. Why is that? Well, there are a few reasons. Seafood Doesn’t Contain Carbohydrates People end up getting type 2 diabetes when their bodies have trouble processing insulin, a hormone that helps our cells convert glucose into energy. When glucose can’t be used properly, it builds up in the blood. This can have serious long-term consequences, such as heart disease, kidney disease and nerve damage. That means foods that are free of glucose are a diabetic’s friend—and fish, like other meats, fits the bill. It doesn’t contain carbohydrates, and so it doesn’t make blood glucose levels go up. Seafood is Low in Trans and Saturated Fats What sets fish apart from other meat products is that it’s also low in trans and saturated fats. And for people living with diabetes, that’s a huge plus. Maintaining a healthy body weight, a healthy heart and low levels of cholesterol reduces the risk of many complications associated with the disease. That doesn’t mean that fish are fat-free. But their fats are unsaturated, and therefore benign. They also contain fatty acids. Seafood Contains Omega-3 Fatty Acids In this context, the word “fatty” might sound a bit misleading. Some fatty acids, such as omega-3s, are Continue reading >>

7 Best Fish Varieties For Diabetics - Myvita Wellness

7 Best Fish Varieties For Diabetics - Myvita Wellness

Choose your fish wisely to ward off diabetes Good nutrition is essential for everyone, but it is particularly important if you are living with diabetes. The deadliest complication of diabetes is heart disease. Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health.Eating fish just once a week can reduce your risk by 40 per cent, according to a Harvard School of Public Health study. The fatty acids in fish reduce insulin resistance and inflammation in the body a major contributor to coronary disease. But remember to choose your fish wisely, as some varieties are much better for managing or warding off diabetes than others. Here are 7 of the best fish varieties for diabetics. Salmon is at the top of our list because it is high in omega-3, the healthy fats that can reduce the inflammation in your blood cells as well as help your cholesterol. The Omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are connected with a whole slew of other health benefits as well. These benefits include heart, brain, and eye health. Salmon is also great for managing blood glucose levels and improving your bodys ability to respond to insulin. As with most fish, you have a number of healthy options for cooking salmon, including poaching, broiling, and baking. Herring is an excellent choice for diabetics for many reasons. First and foremost, it is one of the best food sources of vitamin D. There seems to be more to vitamin D than strong teeth and bones. Its now thought that vitamin D deficiency might be a factor in many diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Additionally, Herring is loaded with EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These fatty acids help prevent heart disease and keep the brain functioning properly. They are also effective in reducing inflammation in the b Continue reading >>

What Can A Type 2 Diabetic Eat?

What Can A Type 2 Diabetic Eat?

Type 2 diabetics can eat a wide variety of foods, but have to limit saturated fats, sweets, and high-carbohydrate products. Snacking should be curtailed, but a doctor or dietitian might suggest eating smaller meals more often to stop in-between hunger pangs. The type 2 diet also requires meal planning, since it calls for a cutback on prepackaged and processed foods. Grains Stick to whole grains, since they help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. Try whole wheat or rye bread, brown rice, oatmeal, cream of wheat, and high-fiber cereals. Fruits All fruits are good for diabetics, but some are better than others. Among those that raise blood-glucose levels more slowly are apples, oranges, grapefruit, bananas, various berries, and cantaloupe. Grapes lower insulin resistance, allowing insulin in your body to more quickly lower blood sugar. Vegetables Green leafy vegetables are better than starchy choices like potatoes, corn, and lima beans. Broccoli is among the best things to eat, especially for type 2 diabetics, since it contains high levels of chromium, found to regulate blood sugars. Other good vegetables include legumes, like pinto beans, kidney beans, and navy beans, as well as squash, zucchini, kale, and okra. Avocados are a good source of vitamin E and monounsaturated fats, which help lower bad cholesterol. Protein The most important thing to watch when you consume protein sources is the fat content. Eat chicken or turkey without the skin, and make sure selections of beef and pork contain no gristle. Among seafood, enjoy tuna, salmon, clams, crabs, oysters, shrimp, and mussels. Eggs are a good choice for breakfast, but limit yourself to just a few a week. Nuts are a good way to get protein, especially almonds, which are high in fiber. Dairy Watch the fat cont Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Seafood For Diabetics?

What Are The Best Seafood For Diabetics?

Seafood is a great source of minerals and vitamins and they also do not add to the saturated fats and calories. This makes them a healthy choice. In fact, as per the American Heart Association, you can have 3.5 ounces of servings of fish every week in order to get the maximum benefit. When you are a diabetes patient, your body is unable to utilize and store the sugar you get from the food you eat in an appropriate manner. This happens because the main hormone insulin responsible for utilizing glucose fails to function appropriately in a diabetic body. As such, the many complications which patients from diabetes suffer, often prepare them to be mindful of what they eat. In this article, we shall analyze some of the best seafood for diabetic patients. 3 Easy Ways to Manage Diabetes - Sharecare Effectively control diabetes using these doctor recommended tips. sharecare.com Why Can Diabetic Patients Benefit From Eating Seafood? Seafood, particularly fish, have often been considered a healthy source of food for all the diabetes patients. Following are the reasons for the same: Seafood hardly contains any carbohydrates. The total quantity of harmful fats, namely trans fat and saturated fats are low in fish The omega-3 fatty acids present in the seafood goes a long way in helping to deal with the heart-related complications which are so common in all the patients suffering from diabetes Best Seafood for Diabetic Patients Let us see the list of best seafood for people with diabetes: Fish Fish is the seafood which is considered one of the best food options for the diabetic patients. This seafood is a rich source of protein, healthy fat, as well as several vitamins and nutrients. Fish is a good food choice for people who want a healthy heart as they contain omega-3 fatty acids wh Continue reading >>

Eating Fish And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Eating Fish And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A population-based, prospective follow-up study 1Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Find articles by Jacqueline C.M. Witteman 1Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Corresponding author: Geertruida J. van Woudenbergh, [email protected] . Received 2009 Jun 8; Accepted 2009 Aug 2. Copyright 2009 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To investigate the relation between total fish, type of fish (lean and fatty), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in a population-based cohort. The analysis included 4,472 Dutch participants aged 55 years without diabetes at baseline. Dietary intake was assessed with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios (relative risk [RR]) with 95% CIs were used to examine risk associations adjusted for age, sex, lifestyle, and nutritional factors. After 15 years of follow-up, 463 participants developed type 2 diabetes. Median fish intake, mainly lean fish (81%), was 10 g/day. Total fish intake was associated positively with risk of type 2 diabetes; the RR was 1.32 (95% CI 1.021.70) in the highest total fish group (28 g/day) compared with that for nonfish eaters (Ptrend = 0.04). Correspon Continue reading >>

Are Mussels Healthy?

Are Mussels Healthy?

Mussels supply small doses of calcium and vitamin C. Not everyone enjoys mussels, but those who do benefit from a hefty dose of nutrition in each serving. Mussels contain 146 calories per 3-ounce serving, and also supply 20.23 grams of protein. Most of the 3.81 grams of fat are in the form of heart-healthy unsaturated fats, making them a nutritious addition to your diet. You also get a good amount of certain vitamins and minerals that help support your health. A 3-ounce serving of mussels supplies 5.71 milligrams of iron. This is a significant portion of the 8 milligrams of iron men require on a daily basis and the 18 milligrams women should get each day. About two-thirds of the iron in your body is present in hemoglobin, the protein in your red blood cells that moves oxygen to your muscles and tissues. Adequate iron intake might also boost your immune system so you get sick less often. Iron plays a role in cell growth and differentiation as well. Mussels supply 2.27 milligrams of zinc in each 3.5-ounce serving. Men need 11 milligrams of zinc on a daily basis and women require 8 milligrams each day. One of the primary roles of zinc is to support a strong immune system. The mineral also aids in wound healing and cell division. Zinc encourages normal growth and plays a role in your ability to taste and smell as well. A 3.5-ounce serving of mussels contains 20.4 micrograms of vitamin B12. Your daily requirement of vitamin B12 is only 2.4 micrograms, making mussels a significant source of this essential nutrient. Vitamin B12 encourages proper production of red blood cells and helps your neurological system work normally. The vitamin also plays a role in DNA synthesis, and might help protect you from developing cardiovascular disease. A bowl of steamed mussels with lemon ju Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Stocking Your Healthful Freezer: Meat, Poultry, And Fish (part 9)

Stocking Your Healthful Freezer: Meat, Poultry, And Fish (part 9)

Stocking Your Healthful Freezer: Meat, Poultry, and Fish (Part 9) Summers over. You might be thinking wistfully of grilled salmon or lobster or steamed clams. Yes, seafood traditionally seems to be summertime food, but theres no reason that you cant eat it year round. The catch is knowing how to select fish and seafood, whether its fresh or frozen. Most people know that fish, in general, is good for you. For a long time, youve been hearing about fish oils, or omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower your risk of heart disease and arrhythmias, lower your triglycerides (a type of blood fat), and even lower your blood pressure a little. Besides the omega-3s, though, fish is packed with other nutrients, including protein, B vitamins, and various minerals. Fish and other seafood are low in saturated fat, which is an added plus. And lets clear up the myth about shrimp and cholesterol: Yes, shrimp does contain some cholesterol (4 large shrimp contain 43 milligrams). But, shrimp is very low in saturated fat. Remember that its the saturated fat, and not so much the cholesterol, in food that makes a difference in your blood cholesterol. So, youre much better off eating shrimp than a hamburger (just avoid the breaded, fried shrimp). Unfortunately, for all the good things in fish, there are sometimes harmful things, too. Fish may contain toxic chemicals, including mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and dioxins, thanks to pollutants in our environment. In fact, pretty much all fish and shellfish contain mercury and PCBs (which have been banned since the late 1970s). But studies have shown that the health benefits of eating seafood outweigh any of the risks. To be on the safe side, the FDA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have issued guidelines for consuming fish (ch Continue reading >>

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