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Is Msg Bad For Diabetics?

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

Warning: Msg In

Warning: Msg In "health Foods"

Member crusading against enigmatic excitotoxicity which instruct diabetics to AVOID msg, glutamate, and free glutamic acid... but then recommend brewer's yeast as a source brewer's yeast is 5% free glutamic acid (MSG) diabetics, celiacs, and individuals who have candida overgrowth. [ame="Minutes MSG[/ame] [ame="- MSG Part One[/ame] [ame="- MSG Part 2[/ame] [ame="- MSG Part 3[/ame] [ame="- The Truth about MSG Monosodium Glutamate Clinical Nutrition[/ame] check out the glutamic acid content in "amino acid profile" msg has many synonyms. according to wikipedia: of several forms of free glutamate used in foods. Free glutamate may also be present in a wide variety of other additives, including: hydrolyzed vegetable proteins, autolyzed yeast, hydrolyzed yeast, yeast extract, soy extracts, protein isolate, "spices" and "natural flavorings." " if you google bragg's aminos, and find their website (Mechanism of Excitotoxin Effect on the Brain "Since humans concentrate ingested glutamate in their plasma in higher concentrations than any other animal, this fact must figure into the equation as to why glutamates have been increasingly added to human processed food, despite scientific evidence presented to Congress, in order to achieve the desired neurological degeneration in line with both Malthusian population reduction mandates, allopathic fund generation and neurological behavior modification programs." Member crusading against enigmatic excitotoxicity except that which occurs naturally in yeast extract and vegetable proteins." This heap of steaming, pseudoscientific claptrap needs to be removed from public view on the unlikely chance that someone will actually believe the garbage being purveyed here. The most significant thing he says is this: "Since humans concentrate ingested Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Msg: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Msg: What You Need To Know

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a salt of the amino acid glutamate. It’s commonly used to enhance flavor in certain dishes and processed food. MSG is said to invoke a “fifth taste.” This is otherwise known as “umami,” a complex, savory flavor. MSG is found in many fermented sauces and processed meals, sauces, and soups. It can also be found naturally in aged cheeses and meats, and in some ripe fruits, such as tomatoes. MSG is stereotypically associated with Asian foods, especially Chinese, in the United States. This harmful stereotype has encouraged the myth of “Chinese restaurant syndrome,” which is an idea that links eating Chinese cuisines with immediate negative physical effects. However, no convincing research exists to prove that MSG is more harmful in Chinese food than in other foods. Natural glutamates that share a chemical makeup with MSG have never been linked to any negative symptoms. Nonetheless, MSG may be linked to health issues, including obesity and diabetes. Some studies have examined the relationship of MSG and obesity or diabetes, with mixed results. MSG may encourage feelings of fullness. MSG is recognized as safe by the FDA. Some studies suggest no association between MSG and weight gain. A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that MSG may be able to help keep weight in check. Results showed that MSG may increase appetite but also enhance feelings of fullness. Another study followed over 1,000 healthy adults for five years. An inverse relationship was found between MSG and hyperglycemia. This means that a greater intake of MSG may lower the incidence of hyperglycemia, and vice versa. Umami is a well-known and sought-after quality in food. Eating MSG for the “umami” flavor is not harmful by itself. Entire resta Continue reading >>

Sodium And Diabetes

Sodium And Diabetes

found naturally in the soil and the ocean and is an , meaning the body requires it in the diet. When sodium is combined chemically or naturally with another mineral (chloride), it forms a salt (about 40% sodium and 60% chloride). So different varieties of table salt are sodium chloride.' Whereas you can find sodium in food sources, too. We'll get to this in just a moment. We need sodium for a variety of important functions in the body: to help regulate blood pressure, maintain pH balance, conduct nerve impulses, and contract/relax muscles. Though while we do need sodium, the majority of people in Western countries consume excessive amountsso much so that blood pressure is elevated beyond what is healthy (130/85), putting people at risk for heart disease and stroke, the number one cause of overall death and diabetes related death. Populations at higher risk include: African Americans, those over the age of 50, and those with diabetes, kidney disease or hypertension. over recommended sodium restrictions, the strongest evidence to date suggests that reducing intake to 2300 (general population) or possible 1500 mg/day (for those at high risk) helps. Lowering sodium intake below 1500 mg/day poses no additional benefit and may, in fact, increase risk for a variety of health issues. Sodium is found naturally in all plant and animal foods and even in unfiltered water sources. Therefore it is neither possible, nor would it be wise, to attempt a no sodium or salt free diet. If you're curious about how much sodium is in a given food, check the label, and remember to check the serving size! Or use 1500-2300 mg/day is a recommended general range . If a product is >400 mg per entree serving, put it back on the shelf and keep looking for a better option. is probably the most common f Continue reading >>

How Does Msg Affect Your Health?

How Does Msg Affect Your Health?

MSG, or monosodium glutamate, is a common and widespread additive in food used mainly for flavor enhancement, but also for preservation. MSG has been used for well over a century as a food additive, but in the last couple of decades anecdotal claims of illness have been linked to MSG consumption. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration lists MSG as "generally recognized as safe," although some health experts believe that it can negatively affect your health. MSG safety is controversial and requires more research. MSG is the salt form of glutamic acid, which is a naturally occurring amino acid. Seaweeds and many other plants and vegetables contain glutamic acid. MSG produces a savory but salty taste when added to food, which excites your taste buds and stimulates the release of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters, according to the book Human Biochemistry. The pleasant taste of MSG and the release of neurotransmitters are thought to be the basis for mild levels of addiction that some people may develop to the food additive. When MSG is added to food, the FDA requires that it be listed on the label, although its called by a variety of different names which may confuse consumers. For example, MSG is also known as hydrolyzed vegetable or plant protein and sodium caseinate. Common side effects that have been reported related to MSG consumption include severe headache, flushing, sweating, facial tightness, heart palpitations, chest pains, shortness of breath, nausea, muscle weakness; and numbness, tingling or burning in the mouth, around the face and in the limbs, according to MayoClinic.com. Some people report more severe reactions than others, but the existence of cause and effect, as well as that of potentially dangerous dosages, have not been well established. MSG disr Continue reading >>

Monosodium Glutamate (msg) Intake Is Associated With The Prevalence Of Metabolic Syndrome In A Rural Thai Population

Monosodium Glutamate (msg) Intake Is Associated With The Prevalence Of Metabolic Syndrome In A Rural Thai Population

Abstract Epidemiology and animal models suggest that dietary monosodium glutamate (MSG) may contribute to the onset of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Families (n = 324) from a rural area of Thailand were selected and provided MSG as the sole source for the use in meal preparation for 10 days. Three hundred forty-nine subjects aged 35–55 years completed the study and were evaluated for energy and nutrient intake, physical activity, and tobacco smoking. The prevalence of overweight and obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >3), and the metabolic syndrome (ATP III criteria) were evaluated according to the daily MSG intake. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in the tertile with the highest MSG intake. Further, every 1 g increase in MSG intake significantly increased the risk of having the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval-CI- 1.12 - 1.28) or being overweight (odds ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.04 - 1.29), independent of the total energy intake and the level of physical activity. Higher amounts of individual MSG consumption are associated with the risk of having the metabolic syndrome and being overweight independent of other major determinants. Background The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors including major risk factors are abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Moreover, other risk factors have been proposed including physical inactivity, aging, smoking, and carbohydrate and fat dietary intake[1]. The incidence and prevalence of the metabolic syndrome are rapidly growing causing a significant burden for health systems worldwide[2]. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor enhancer largely used in the food industry with individual consumption steadily increasing worldwid Continue reading >>

Effects Of Oral Monosodium (l)-glutamate On Insulin Secretion And Glucose Tolerance In Healthy Volunteers

Effects Of Oral Monosodium (l)-glutamate On Insulin Secretion And Glucose Tolerance In Healthy Volunteers

Go to: Methods Eighteen healthy volunteers, aged 19–28 years (mean 22 years) and weighing 52–81 kg (mean 68 kg), were included in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over investigation. The protocol was approved by the institutional Ethics Committee of Montpellier and all subjects gave written informed consent to participate. One subject did not complete the study for personal reasons and was not included in the final analysis. Subjects were assigned to take a single oral 10 g dose of monosodium (l)-glutamate (ORSAN S.A., Paris, France) or placebo, both packaged in identical capsules to mask the taste of glutamate and maintain the blind integrity. The two administrations were separated by a 7 day washout. In the morning of each test-day, subjects were admitted to the Clinical Investigation Center, in fasting conditions for at least 12 h. Two baseline venous blood samples were taken at 15 min intervals. Then, the treatment (20 capsules of monosodium (l)-glutamate or 20 capsules of placebo) was administered simultaneously with an oral glucose load (75 g). Blood samples were taken 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 min after the start of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Plasma glutamate concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography [3]. Blood glucose concentrations were determined by the glucose oxidase method, insulin and glucagon by radioimmunoassay. Insulin secretion was assessed as the area under the curve (AUC) of insulin concentrations during OGTT, glucose tolerance as the glucose AUC during OGTT and insulin sensitivity calculated as the composite insulin sensitivity index (ISI) according to Matsuda & DeFronzo [7]. Results are given as means ± standard error (s.e. mean). Where necessary, 95% confidence intervals Continue reading >>

The Harmful Effects Of Monosodium Glutamate (msg)

The Harmful Effects Of Monosodium Glutamate (msg)

Glutamate is a natural amino acid found in foods containing protein, like milk, mushrooms and fish. Monosodium glutamate (MSG), manufactured with only the sodium salt of glutamate, is designed to be a flavor enhancer and is found in many foods. However, clever labeling practices and deceptions serve to camouflage its presence. Consider the claim “no added MSG.” This claim means that there was no MSG poured into the product—even if it was processed into the product. This is the practice of the glutamate industry and the food producers who use MSG. Why Do This? It’s simple: it keeps the money coming in and they don’t have to change their formula. Consider these MSG facts: Since the introduction, in the past 30 years, the incidence of Type II Diabetes has doubled. Obesity in children has skyrocketed! MSG is injected into lab animals to induce obesity so that pharmaceutical companies can test their drugs. Why is MSG Harmful? The glutamate industry is fully aware of the harmful effects of MSG, that it is a toxic substance. They know that ingesting their toxin can cause diabetes, adrenal gland malfunction, seizures, high blood pressure, excessive weight gain, stroke and other health problems. If you eat MSG and experience any of these conditions, then you need to immediately eliminate MSG from your diet. 4 Ways to Eliminate Toxins from MSG Carefully read product labels at the market. Whenever you see it, avoid the products with MSG in their ingredients. At restaurants, ask if they serve dishes containing MSG. Avoid fast foods. Most use MSG in their fries and drinks to enhance the flavor and to get you addicted to their foods. Consuming MSG causes swelling of the mucus membranes in the gastrointestinal tract. Cleanse your colon regularly to prevent this swelling. † Continue reading >>

Msg: More Than Meets The Tongue

Msg: More Than Meets The Tongue

Most of our lives are spent obtaining food, preparing food, cooking food, and taking the time to savor food. Food is colourful, flavorful and simply delightful. The only drawback is wondering what our next meal is going to be. A simple solution for most working class people in the world: eating out. With such an abundance of neighborhood fast-food restaurants or take-out place at competing prices, eating out has become the latest trend in filling the stomach of many. In fact, the idea of purchasing pre-cooked meals has become such a widely accessible concept that people choose this alternative over the time- and energy-consuming method of simply cooking their own meals. However, there are consequences to this alternative. Although we have a mindset of what unhealthy food is, sometimes ignorance is bliss, and a full stomach is all we need in order to continue with our day’s work. We constantly worry and monitor our fat and caloric content of what we eat; however, there may be more important aspects that we should be worried or concerned about. For example, monosodium glutamate, or more commonly known as MSG, is added to almost every fast food and take-out meal we eat. The majority of people pay no attention to it simply because they are either unaware of its presence in food or are unsure of what MSG really is. MSG may have more detrimental effects on the human body than simply being a food additive. So what exactly is MSG? Why is it added to foods? What are its effects on the human body? Is it harmful even though it is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)? Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been used as a flavor enhancer for over a century. In 1908, Kikunae Ikeda, a Japanese scientist, extracted glutamic acid from the seaweed Laminaria Japonica and discovere Continue reading >>

Msg Side Effects And How To Avoid Them

Msg Side Effects And How To Avoid Them

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a brain stimulant that was originally extracted from seaweed in 1908. Most commonly associated with restaurant Chinese food, it is used pervasively as a flavor enhancer in fast foods, frozen meals, canned soups, and potato chips. This additive can be extremely harmful: MSG side effects range from obesity to liver damage. Many studies link MSG to the development of obesity, and children are especially susceptible. The Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences discovered that MSG given to newborn mice increases their body weight by 7.9 percent.[1] It also causes an increase in body mass index and fat mass as well as significant increases in total cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL, and LDL (both types of “bad” cholesterol). Additional studies show that maternal exposure to MSG during pregnancy leads to childhood obesity.[2,3] Research shows that increases in weight, body fat, and obesity also occur in adults who consume MSG.[4] MSG Side Effects: Brain Damage and Chemical Changes Additional dangers to infants and prenatal subjects include brain damage.[2] This damage leads to convulsions and seizures during infancy. Equally frightening are the following chemical changes that occur in the body as a result of ingesting MSG. Adiponectin, a protein that helps the body regulate blood sugar and energy expenditure, is lowered by nearly 60 percent.[1] This causes an increase in blood sugar levels and a decrease in metabolism, a combination that can trigger weight gain and food cravings. Leptin becomes unrecognizable to the brain. This chemical messenger is normally released by fat cells and then travels to the brain to deliver the signal to stop eating. However, in people who consume MSG, receptors in the brain become incapable of receiving this signal Continue reading >>

Eating Away From Home

Eating Away From Home

For many people, eating foods prepared away from home is a way of life. Whether at restaurants, take-out counters, vending machines or corner stores, making healthy choices is possible and important. Balancing healthy food with regular physical activity can help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes or its complications. Here are some tips to help you enjoy healthy foods and meals wherever you are. Consider these healthy eating tips When planning a meal or snack, make healthy choices based on Canada’s Food Guide. Canada’s Food Guide describes how much food you need and what type of food is part of healthy eating. Choose foods that provide: Fibre Slows the rise in blood glucose (sugar), helps improve cholesterol levels and helps you feel full Choose vegetables, fruits, beans, lentils, whole grains Vitamins & minerals Help keep the body healthy and fight infection Choose brightly coloured vegetables over french fries, milk over pop, whole grain over white bread Choose foods lower in: Fat Provides extra calories; saturated and trans fats increase your risk of heart disease Limit fast food, baked goods, fatty meats, cream Sodium (salt) Can lead to high blood pressure Limit fast food, canned/dried soups, salty snacks, prepared frozen dinners Sugar Provides extra calories; may make control of blood glucose (sugar) and blood fats difficult Limit regular pop, fruit drinks, candies, desserts Overcome the challenges of making healthy food choices away from home Challenges I have faced Possible solutions Limited choices are available Bring healthy food from home such as sandwiches, nuts, and washed, pre-cut vegetables and fruit Check out all options before making your choice Portions are too big Think about portion size before making your choice (avoid “super-sizing Continue reading >>

How Diet Foods And Drinks Can Actually Cause, Not Prevent Diabetes

How Diet Foods And Drinks Can Actually Cause, Not Prevent Diabetes

A new study showed that two additives often put in everyday foods to enhance flavor (Monosodium Glutamate or MSG) and reduce calories (Aspartame) can actually cause an increase in fasting blood glucose levels Aspartame alone can cause an increase in fasting blood glucose levels and reduced insulin sensitivity, but when combined with MSG they caused an elevation in both weight and fasting glucose levels Aspartame and MSG are not only both excitotoxins, which can lead to neurological damage, but they interfere with the release of insulin and leptin, which are hormones intricately involved with satiety and fat storage In order to prevent, and reverse, type 2 diabetes, eliminate not only sugar and grains, but also artificially sweetened, MSG-“enhanced” diet foods from your diet, in favor of real, whole foods By Dr. Mercola Many people equate eating sugar with the development of type 2 diabetes, and in an attempt to be healthier choose sugar-free diet products instead. Imagine the irony if those diet products actually contained substances that cause an increase in fasting blood glucose levels and contribute to the onset of diabetes. Now stop imagining, because this isn't just a fantasy … it's the disturbing result of a newly published study. Two Toxic Food Additives Common in Diet Foods May Cause Diabetes A new study using mice as models showed that two additives often put in everyday foods to enhance flavor and reduce calories can actually cause an increase in fasting blood glucose levels, and contribute to the onset of diabetes. The toxins in this startling new study are aspartame and monosodium glutamate (MSG), and the evidence is stacked against them both. The research showed that aspartame alone can cause an increase in fasting blood glucose levels and reduced ins Continue reading >>

Msg And Hyperglycemia

Msg And Hyperglycemia

MSG intake has been thought to increase the risk of insulin resistance but a study in China where people consume the most MSG and have the highest absolute incidence of diabetes showed…. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a widely used flavor enhancing amino acid and is generally accepted as safe. In Western countries, MSG is usually consumed in processed and packaged goods whereas in China, MSG is often added during home cooking. It is estimated that 650,000 tonnes of MSG are used worldwide each year. MSG intake has been found to increase the risk of insulin resistance, diabetes and obesity in studies done in rodents. In this study, researchers assessed the association between MSG intake and the risk of hyperglycemia after five years, based on a large population-based study in China, the Jiangsu Nutrition Study (JIN). The study included 445 men and 611 women (n = 1056) with a fasting plasma glucose <5.6 mmol/l (FPG<100.9 mg/dl) in 2002 and without known diabetes. No differences in mean BMI, waist circumference, glucose, and energy intake were found (p > 0.05). The authors defined diabetes as FPG>7.0 mmol/l (FPG > 126 mg/dl) or having known diabetes and hyperglycemia as FPG>5.6 mmol/l (FPG>100.9 mg/dl). To determine the amount of MSG and other seasonings consumed by individuals, each household was asked about their usual monthly consumption of these items. Individual consumption of MSG was calculated according to the total amount of MSG consumed in the household divided by the number of individuals per household and then adjusted for the proportion energy intake and energy consumption by each individual. Cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activity were also evaluated in these participants. In the results, the authors found the mean intake of MSG for the en Continue reading >>

Can Msg Raise Your Blood Sugar If You Are Diabetic?

Can Msg Raise Your Blood Sugar If You Are Diabetic?

Can MSG raise your blood sugar if you are Diabetic? I heard that MSG is bad for you but have no idea why? Why is MSG bad for you? Where does MSG come from? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: MSG stands for monosodium glutamate. It is often added to food in cheap Chinese restaurants and some processed foods and can cause unpleasant reactions in anyone sensitive to it. You might want to ask a doctor or nutritionist about this, but a guess based on my limited knowledge suggests that it's more likely to raise one's blood pressure. MSG is not bad for you. This myth started when a doctor back in the 1950's or 60's I believe ate at a Chinese restaurant and later experienced sweating, a fast heart rhythm and other nondescript symptoms. He reported his "findings" to a medical journal and ever since people have shunned MSG. These days people can suffer from "MSG symptoms" due to the placebo effect, in which they think they should develop symptoms and therefore do. MSG was discovered when a Japanese chemist asked his wife what gave her soups such a rich intense, "umami" flavor. She showed him a certain seaweed that she soaked in water and used to create the broth. The chemist was determined to pinpoint the source and after several experiments, isolated the chemical in the seaweed: MSG. I'm not sure where manufacturers get MSG these days, they might create it in a lab or possibly still extract it from seaweed. Either way, it is not harmful, there have been no conclusive, scientific studies that show MSG causes dangerous or even annoying symptoms. Source(s): Experienced cook and psychologist I'm a 45 year old woman and was recently diagnosed as being a borderline diabetic. My doctor prescribed some medication, but before filling it I decided to do some resear Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What you eat makes a big difference when you have diabetes. When you build your diet, four key things to focus on are carbs, fiber, fat, and salt. Here's what you should know about each of them. Carbs give you fuel. They affect your blood sugar faster than fats or protein. You’ll mainly get them from: Fruit Milk and yogurt Bread, cereal, rice, pasta Starchy vegetables like potatoes, corn, and beans Some carbs are simple, like sugar. Other carbs are complex, like those found in beans, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains. Complex carbohydrates are better for you because they take longer for your body to digest. They give you steady energy and fiber. You may have heard of “carbohydrate counting.” That means you keep track of the carbs (sugar and starch) you eat each day. Counting grams of carbohydrate, and splitting them evenly between meals, will help you control your blood sugar. If you eat more carbohydrates than your insulin supply can handle, your blood sugar level goes up. If you eat too little, your blood sugar level may fall too low. You can manage these shifts by knowing how to count carbs. One carbohydrate serving equals 15 grams of carbohydrates. A registered dietitian can help you figure out a carbohydrate counting plan that meets your specific needs. For adults, a typical plan includes two to four carb servings at each meal, and one to two as snacks. You can pick almost any food product off the shelf, read the label, and use the information about grams of carbohydrates to fit the food into your meal plan. Anyone can use carb counting. It’s most useful for people who take more than one daily injection of insulin, use the insulin pump, or want more flexibility and variety in their food choices. You get fiber from plant foods -- fruits, vegetables, whole g Continue reading >>

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