diabetestalk.net

Is Milk Is Good For Diabetes Patients?

Milk And Diabetes: A Closer Look At The Best Options

Milk And Diabetes: A Closer Look At The Best Options

Like all individual foods in our diet, there’s often debate about whether they are good or bad for our health – and milk doesn’t escape this analysis. When it comes to milk and diabetes, you have full fat, skim milk and low fat options for dairy milk. Then you have soy milk, rice milk, almond milk and coconut milk for non-dairy options. So overall, what is the best option? Let’s explore this topic in more detail, starting with dairy milk… Dairy Milk On the one hand, dairy products have long been promoted as healthy inclusions in our diet – they contain calcium (for strong bones), along with magnesium, vitamin D, and whey proteins. Milk proteins in particular are considered high quality proteins, which according to research may help in reducing body fat and insulin resistance, along with showing benefits for glucose regulation and metabolic health. On the other hand though, milk also contains fat and carbs. For many the major concern is the fat content, which is why it’s often assumed that skim milk or low fat options are best. Before delving into this further, let’s just compare the nutrition facts for dairy milks. Per half cup Full cream milk Low fat Fat free Calories 76 51 39.5 Total carbs 6 6 6 Protein 4 4 4 Fat 4.05 1.18 0 Notice something about these? They all have the same carb and protein content, the only difference is the calories and fat content. Because they are so similar, you can really choose any of the options. Don’t be scared of full fat as studies suggest there is no association between intake of full fat dairy and type 2 diabetes – which basically means they are not necessarily good or bad. As for cardiovascular disease, research indicates that dairy consumption (full fat or not) may have a beneficial effect, reducing the risk of st Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - You Could Prevent Condition By Doing This Every Day

Type 2 Diabetes - You Could Prevent Condition By Doing This Every Day

Experts have revealed people who drink milk are less prone to diabetes and hypertension, according to a study by the Duke NUS Medical School. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The study reported adults who drink at least one 240ml glass of milk every day have a 12 per cent lower risk of diabetes. They also have an 11 per cent lower risk of hypertension - also known as high blood pressure. The researchers, from Singapore, also found similar results with other dairy products including Milo and Yakult. Participants came from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, which covers more than 60,000 participants who are now between 45 and 74 years old. Researchers followed up with the participants over a period of ten years. They focused on only one racial group in order to standardise the study methodology, as this reduced dietary differences that arise from cultural factors. However, Professor Koh Woon Puay, who led the study, said the health benefits could be applied to people of all racial groups and ages. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Adults who drink at least one 240ml glass of milk every day have a 12 per cent lower risk of diabetes The study does not specify which type of mil Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

A cold glass of milk invigorates your taste buds and gives you a boost of calcium, but people with diabetes need to be selective with their milk choices. Milk provides important nutrients for bone health, but some varieties contain large amounts of saturated fat and sugar, which should be limited in a diabetic diet. Video of the Day Milk on a Diabetic Diet According to ''Diabetes Forecast,'' a publication from the American Diabetes Association, diabetes increases your chance of developing bone fractures, a risk that increases as you age and lose bone mass. Calcium-rich foods, such as milk, help keep your bones strong and protect against osteoporosis, a serious bone loss that can lead to broken bones and decreased mobility. Since milk contains lactose, a type of sugar, it needs to be counted toward your daily carbohydrate totals. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition plan recommends 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, which includes one serving of dairy. Eight ounces of milk count as one dairy serving. Skim and Low-fat Milk Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, but you can control your risk by limiting your intake of saturated fat. One cup of whole milk provides 149 calories and 5 grams of saturated fat, but 1 cup of skim milk contains only 83 calories and 0.1 gram of saturated fat. If you prefer milk with a thicker texture than skim milk, try 1 percent milk, which has 102 calories and 1.5 grams of saturated fat per cup. All plain milk varieties provide about 12 grams of sugar per cup, but chocolate, strawberry and vanilla milk contain added sugar, so read the food label before purchasing. Benefits of Soy Milk If you do not like regular milk or are lactose intolerant, soy milk makes a healthy alternative. One cup of regular soy milk provides 131 Continue reading >>

Which Of These Is Good For Diabetics, Milk, Yoghurt Or Buttermilk?

Which Of These Is Good For Diabetics, Milk, Yoghurt Or Buttermilk?

Yogurt is no doubt works for diabetic patients but it is advised to avoid flavored yogurt. Flavored yogurt contains artificial sugar, which will rise up the level of sugar in your blood. People who suffer from diabetes should be more concerned in food they should avoid from diet to stay away from disease and maintain perfect sugar level. Carbonated Drinks Trans Fat Baked Foods Flavored Yogurt Avoidable Carbohydrate Junk Food Honey Sweetened Preservatives Chips or Nachos Sugary Fruits Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

Milk And Diabetes.

Milk And Diabetes.

Abstract Type 1 diabetes is based on autoimmunity, and its development is in part determined by environmental factors. Among those, milk intake is discussed as playing a pathogenic role. Geographical and temporal relations between type 1 diabetes prevalence and cow's milk consumption have been found in ecological studies. Several case-control studies found a negative correlation between frequency and/or duration of breast-feeding and diabetes, but this was not confirmed by all authors. T-cell and humoral responses related to cow's milk proteins were suggested to trigger diabetes. The different findings of studies in animals and humans as well as the potential underlying mechanisms with regard to single milk proteins (bovine serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein) are discussed in this review. In contrast to type 1 diabetes, the etiology of type 2 diabetes, characterized by insulin resistance is still unclear. In a population with a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the Pima Indians, people who were exclusively breastfed had significantly lower rates of type 2 diabetes than those who were exclusively bottlefed. Studies in lactovegetarians imply that consumption of low fat dairy products is associated with lower incidence and mortality of diabetes and lower blood pressures. In contrast, preference for a diet high in animal fat could be a pathogenic factor, and milk and high fat dairy products contribute considerably to dietary fat intake. Concerning milk fat composition, the opposite effects of various fatty acids (saturated fatty acids, trans-fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid) in vitro, in animals and in humans have to be considered. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Whole Milk For those with diabetes, a diet high in saturated fat can worsen insulin resistance. Keep whole milk out of the fridge, and pick up 1% (low-fat) or skim (non-fat) milk instead. Also, try your best to avoid other whole-milk dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, regular cheese and cream cheese; instead, choose their reduced-fat counterparts whenever possible Previous Next More Photos Bacon White Bread Continue reading >>

How Drinking Milk Could Protect You From Diabetes

How Drinking Milk Could Protect You From Diabetes

Drinking milk may help prevent type 2 diabetes – the disease linked to obesity. Contrary to the popular perception of dairy products as unhealthy, regular consumption could actually reduce the risk of developing the condition by up to 60 per cent, according to a study. The ingredient responsible is trans-palmitoleic acid, a fatty acid found in the dairy fat of milk, cheese, yoghurt and butter. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health in the United States say it can combat type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 2.3million Britons. In the study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, more than 3,700 participants were followed for 20 years by researchers. They took measurements including blood glucose, insulin and levels of fatty acids. They found that higher levels of trans-palmitoleic acid were associated with healthier levels of blood cholesterol and insulin. Overall, those with the highest levels of trans-palmitoleic acid had about a 60 per cent reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Dariush Mozaffarian said: 'The magnitude of this association is striking. 'This represents an almost three-fold difference in risk of developing diabetes among individuals with the highest blood levels of this fatty acid.' The study also appears to confirm previous research showing that a diet rich in dairy foods is linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities. A review of 324 studies of milk consumption and effects on health last year suggested the health benefits of milk outweigh any dangers that lie in its consumption, cutting deaths from common diseases by 15-20 per cent. As little as one-third of a pint a day shows benefits in some studies while others involve regular consumption of almost a pint a day. Dr Mozaff Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Is Milk Good For Diabetics

Is Milk Good For Diabetics

Highlights Diabetic people should ensure that they take drinks, fruits and meals that are low in sugars; this means that under all cost they should keep away from milk with added artificial flavors. When diabetic you have to be careful on the kind of milk you drink Some diabetic people have been associated with having a weak The best way to ensure that you have strong bones is by ensuring that you increase your intake of calcium and there is no better source than drinking milk. As a child, basically, you had to drink milk. In fact on the first 6 months of being nursed milk was the only thing you took. Then there were a variety of options on milk to drink from, whether your parents chose to give you whole milk or sweetened almond milk the benefits in both cannot be ignored. Now that you are a grown up, the only thing that has changed is the fact that you will make the choice yourself. As a diabetic, you should be aware that you have to ensure that you monitor your intake of carbs, carbohydrates, and sugars. And, it is for this reason that you shouldn’t drink just any milk. Even with the essential nutrients such as proteins and calcium before taking any milk you should ensure that you drink milk that has low fat and sugar. Dietary needs for people with diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by the ineffective of insulin hormone. Basically, insulin is a hormone generated by the body to help regulate the blood sugar levels, when insulin isn’t functioning then there will be a sharp increase in the blood sugar levels. Whether you have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, so as to lead a healthy life and avoid any further complications you have to manage your sugar intake. It is most recommended that you stick to a low-carb diet while diabetic. Diabetes is often Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

What’s The Best Type Of Milk For You?

What’s The Best Type Of Milk For You?

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connect’s weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. “Just because something is called 'milk' does not mean it’s nutritious,” warns Dr. David Katz, a nutrition expert from the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center. If you’ve taken a look beyond dairy lately, “milk” options abound, often leaving consumers wondering what’s best for their health. The milk controversy: do we need milk? Dairy milk is certainly full of protein, but most people in the United States aren’t lacking protein in their diets. “Rather than acknowledge that they get along just fine without it, many seek out ‘milk’ substitutes, like soymilk, around which whole industries have been built,” according to Aaron E. Carroll, MD, in the New York Times. Dr. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine, finds there’s “nothing wrong with a periodic glass because you like it,” but he argues that “there’s also very little evidence that it’s doing them much good.” The USDA may recommend three cups per day, even for adults, but that’s a controversial suggestion. We’re told calcium strengthens our bones, but studies show the calcium in milk may not be providing that for us, regardless of the dairy industry’s claims. Nutrients “Milks” are now being made from grains, nuts and seeds—a huge change from the past when dairy milk was king—giving those with allergies, lactose intolerance, and other diet restrictions a slew of other options to choose from. Dairy milk isn’t without its benefits. It’s chock-full of vitamins D and K, protein Continue reading >>

Milk Bad For Diabetes?

Milk Bad For Diabetes?

I counsel many clients who are in the pre-diabetes stages or are suffering from full blown diabetes. They are worried about table sugar and are ready to skip it in their morning cuppa or just quit eating sweets..But we have many doctors who know all about “nutrition” and “diet” and end up advising patients about their diets and project themselves that they know it all. I have heard doctors advising to skip sugar(okay acceptable), stop eating fruits(why on earth do they advise this) and stop drinking milk!!! These are the foods considered by doctors to be high in sugar. To tell you the truth, all foods contain sugars except for oils,egg whites,poultry and meats etc and also air and water. I ask my clients who want to have sugar free diets whether they want to live only on these foods and air and water. Then they realize that they were depriving themselves of the foods their body requires. If any doctor asks you to miss a complete food group in your diet, then he or she is misleading you. Avoiding sugars is acceptable as most of our foods do provide us with natural or “hidden” sugars but avoiding dairy products is like a crime to the body. Milk and milk products are like elixir to the body. It has been proved that consuming low fat dairy products can help to reduce insulin resistance, than those who were avoiding dairy. The sugar present in milk products are lactose, which is also known as milk sugar, is said to be converted to blood sugar relatively slowly. This can help in blood sugar control and also help in reducing insulin resistance. (Pic showing a smart lady sipping on milk) The protein present in milk too will fill you up and will prevent mid meal binges. If you are overweight, then you can opt for fat free milk products, but if your weight is under co Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Milk

Can Diabetics Drink Milk

When it comes to certain foods, there are always questions as to whether or not a diabetic can have them without causing significant fluctuations in glucose levels. One such food item is milk. So the question remains: is it safe for diabetics? Actually, milk is fine for diabetics, as long as they use the moderation rule. However, they do need to consider how it can affect their blood sugar. It is best if the milk is low fat so that it causes that much less of a surge in sugar. Whole milk is not a good idea, though, due to the high levels of both glucose and lactose. For those who enjoy milk but may have an apprehension to drinking it there are other alternatives. You can try soy or rice milk. These offer virtually the same flavor as cow's milk but with some added nutritional features. These milks are also low in fat, which is one of the features of cow's milk that is not favorable. Plus, alternative milk options takes care of the problem that some have with lactose. Diabetics also have to be leery of other products that contain milk. For instance, cheese, yogurt, sour cream, ice cream, and certain creams and sauces used in cooking. It is not only necessary to watch out for these as it relates to milk, but also fat and calorie content, as well. In the end, milk is safe for diabetics as long as it is consumed in small quantities and using low fat or fat free, as long as fat and calorie content is heeded. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up. Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatm Continue reading >>

More in diabetes