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Is Metformin Used To Treat High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

Tweet High blood pressure, or hypertension, is common in people with diabetes. Reports from 2012 show that high blood pressure affects 50% of people with diabetes. Blood pressure is important as it is linked with a higher risk of diabetes complications. The symptoms of blood pressure may not show unless blood pressure becomes very high and so it is important that your blood pressure level is checked each year. Target blood pressure levels The first number in a blood pressure reading is known as the systolic reading, which is the pressure of your blood when your heart beats. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-250 mg-MYL round, white, imprinted with G31, M What is the most important information I should know about glipizide and metformin? Do not use glipizide and metformin if you have congestive heart failure or kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glipizide and metformin. Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremor, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Other sugar sources include orange juice and milk. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is glipizide and metformin? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthca Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Metformin, Can It Raise Your Blood Presure?

Metformin, Can It Raise Your Blood Presure?

Question Originally asked by Community Member William Metformin, Can It Raise Your Blood Presure? I have used Metformin for 5 days. Didn’t feel well yesterday, Myblood pressure was up to 180X 115. Could Metofrmin be the cause? Answer Hi William, Thanks for your question. Metformin is not known to cause an increase in blood pressure, but medications can affect people differently. If you are concerned about the increase, or if it persists, you may want to discuss this with your doctor. You can read more about metformin and its side effects here. Best of luck, Casey You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Casey McNulty Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Fda-approved High Blood Pressure Drug Extends Life Span In Roundworms

Fda-approved High Blood Pressure Drug Extends Life Span In Roundworms

An FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers find that an FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. The drug, hydralazine, extended life span about 25 percent in two strains of C. elegans (roundworms), one a wild type and the other bred to generate high levels of a neurotoxic protein called tau that in humans is associated with Alzheimer's disease. "This is the first report of hydralazine treatment activating the NRF2/SKN-1 signaling pathway. We found the drug extends the life span of worms as well as or better than other potential anti-aging compounds such as curcumin and metformin. The treatment also appeared to maintain their health as measured by tests of flexibility and wiggling speed," said Dr. Hamid Mirzaei, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study, published today in Nature Communications. The NRF2 pathway protects human cells from oxidative stress. The body's ability to protect itself against damaging oxygen free radicals diminishes with age, he said. One of the hallmarks of aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is oxidative stress, which is believed to result cumulatively from inflammatory and infectious illnesses throughout life, Dr. Mirzaei explained. SKN-1, a C. elegans transcription factor, corresponds to NRF2 in humans. Both play a pivotal role in their respective species' responses to oxidative stress and life span, he said. The UT Southwestern researchers were searching for a chemical probe they could use in experiments to id Continue reading >>

Multiple Benefits Of Metformin | Life Extension Magazine

Multiple Benefits Of Metformin | Life Extension Magazine

As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insulin can be devastating. An ideal anti-diabetic drug would enhance cellular insulin sensitivity, inhibit excess intestinal absorption of sugar, reduce excess liver production of glucose, promote weight loss and reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Metformin (Glucophage) is the one drug that does all of this and more. Metformin works by increasing the number of muscle and adipocyte (fat cell) insulin receptors and the attraction for the receptor. It does not increase insulin secretion, it only increases insulin sensitivity. Therefore, metformin is not associated with causing hypoglycemia. This activity reduces insulin levels by increasing the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to the effects of insulin by rejuvenating the response, and restoring glucose and insulin to younger physiological levels that may cause weight loss and most certainly a decrease in the body's total fat content.3-7 In an study published by the American Diabetes Association, metformin was found to decrease the fasting plasma glucose concentration by -60 to -70mg/dl in patients with non-insulin dependent type II diabetes.1 Metformin also reduced hemoglobin A1C levels, a blood measurement of glycosylation. One of the most devastating conseq Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin On Blood Pressure In Nondiabetic Patients: A Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Effects Of Metformin On Blood Pressure In Nondiabetic Patients: A Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Objective:To evaluate the effects of metformin on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in nondiabetic patients. Methods:In this meta-analysis, we systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library through March 2016, and randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of metformin treatment compared with placebo were included. Random-effects models were used to estimate pooled mean differences in SBP and DBP. Results:Twenty-eight studies from 26 articles consisting of 4113 participants were included. Pooled results showed that metformin had a significant effect on SBP (mean difference 1.98 mmHg; 95% confidence interval 3.61, 0.35; P = 0.02), but not on DBP (mean difference 0.67 mmHg; 95% confidence interval 1.74, 0.41; P = 0.22). In subgroup analysis, we found that the effect of metformin on SBP was significant in patients with impaired glucose tolerance or obesity (BMI 30 kg/m2), with a mean reduction of 5.03 and 3.00 mmHg, respectively. Significant heterogeneity was found for both SBP (I 2 = 60.0%) and DBP (I 2 = 45.4%). A sensitivity analysis indicated that the pooled effects of metformin on SBP and DBP were robust to systematically dropping each trial. Furthermore, no evidence of significant publication bias from funnel plots or Egger's tests (P = 0.51 and 0.21 for SBP and DBP, respectively) was found. Conclusion:This meta-analysis suggested that metformin could effectively lower SBP in nondiabetic patients, especially in those with impaired glucose tolerance or obesity. aState Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China bDivision of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

Diabetes Medications: What is metformin? Metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Metformin is taken by mouth (orally) as a pill. Like other diabetes medications, it works best when you follow the rest of your treatment plan. This means checking your blood glucose regularly, following your meal plan, and exercising every day. What does it do? Metformin helps lower your blood glucose (blood sugar). It does this in two ways: • Decrease the amount of glucose released by your liver. Less glucose enters into your bloodstream. • Increase the ability of your muscles to use glucose for energy. As more glucose is used, more glucose leaves your bloodstream. Why is metformin important for my health? Metformin can’t cure your diabetes. But by helping control your blood glucose, it lowers the chance that your diabetes will cause serious problems. As you know, when you have diabetes, you tend to have high blood glucose. Over time, this can damage your blood vessels and nerves, leading to heart attack or stroke, kidney and eye disease, and problems with your teeth, feet, and skin. If you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol — like many people with diabetes — you have an even greater risk for these problems. (This is why you should always take your blood pressure or cholesterol medications as well as your diabetes medications.) Metformin is the generic name of this medication. Brand names are Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Like other diabetes medications, biguanides work best when you follow the rest of your diabetes treatment plan. Does metformin cause hypoglycemia (low blood glucose)? Metformin doesn’t cause hypoglycemia by itself. But combined with other medications, vigorous exercise, or too little food, it ca Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Pressure Drugs May Be Harmful For Some Patients

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Pressure Drugs May Be Harmful For Some Patients

Type 2 diabetes: blood pressure drugs may be harmful for some patients For some patients with type 2 diabetes, treatment with intense blood-lowering medication may do more harm than good. This is according to a new study published in The BMJ. For some patients with type 2 diabetes, antihypertensive medication may raise the risk of cardiovascular death. The researchers - including Mattias Brunstrm of the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Ume University in Sweden - found that antihypertensive drugs may increase the risk of cardiovascular death for diabetes patients with a systolic blood pressure under 140 mm/Hg. While almost 1 in 2 people in the US have high blood pressure , or hypertension , the condition affects around 2 in 3 Americans with diabetes, putting them at higher risk of stroke , heart disease and other cardiovascular problems. As such, people with diabetes are often prescribed medication to help lower blood pressure. The American Diabetes Association recommend a systolic blood pressure target of less than 140 mm/Hg for patients with type 2 diabetes - the most common form of diabetes - though a target of less than 130 mm/Hg is recommended for some patients, if it can be achieved safely. For their study, Brunstrm and his colleague Bo Carlberg, also of the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Ume, set out to investigate whether the effects of antihypertensive medication vary dependent on a patient's blood pressure prior to treatment. Increased cardiovascular death risk for some diabetes patients The team conducted a meta-analysis of 49 randomized controlled trials - involving a total of 73,738 participants - that looked at the cardiovascular outcomes of people with diabetes who were receiving blood pressure-lowering medication Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Janumet 100 mg-50 mg oblong, red, imprinted with 577 What is the most important information I should know about metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Glucophage) or sitagliptin (Januvia), if you have liver or kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin and sitagliptin. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. The combination of metformin and sitagliptin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking metformin and sitagliptin? Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection, if Continue reading >>

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