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Is Metformin Safe To Take

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Metformin is a commonly used drug for managing type 2 diabetes. It is considered an effective treatment option for many people with diabetes, but is it safe for pregnant women? Metformin is a drug that helps to lower blood sugar. It is considered one of the best first line treatments for type 2 diabetes. A review posted to Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome notes that metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels, strengthens the endocrine system, improves insulin resistance, and reduces fat distribution in the body. Before taking any drugs, including metformin, a pregnant woman has to be absolutely sure that the drugs will not affect her or her baby. Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy Some people are concerned about using metformin during and after pregnancy because it crosses the placenta. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby. However, the results of the few studies that have been carried out so far into the effects of taking metformin during pregnancy have been positive. A 2014 review posted to Human Reproduction Update found that the drug did not cause birth defects, complications, or diseases. The researchers did note, however, that larger studies should be carried out to make this evidence more conclusive. Metformin and gestational diabetes A separate review posted to Human Reproduction Update noted that women who took metformin to treat gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) gained less weight than women who took insulin. A 2-year follow-up study found that babies born to the women treated with metformin had less fat around their organs, which could make them less prone to insulin resistance later in life. This could mean that children who are exposed to metformin at a young age could gain long-term benefi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although metformin, the popular type 2 diabetes medication, is usually not prescribed for people with kidney disease, a new analysis shows the drug may be safer for these patients than once thought. Metformin has been used in the United States for two decades to help lower blood sugar levels among people with type 2 diabetes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cautions that people with kidney disease should not take the drug because it could increase their risk for a potentially serious condition called lactic acidosis. This is when lactic acid builds up in the bloodstream after oxygen levels in the body are depleted. After reviewing published research to evaluate the risks associated with metformin among people with mild to moderate kidney disease, a team of researchers led by Dr. Silvio Inzucchi, a professor of medicine at Yale University, found these patients were at no greater risk for lactic acidosis than people who were not taking the drug. "What we found is that there is essentially zero evidence that this is risky," Inzucchi, who is also medical director of the Yale Diabetes Center, said in a university news release. "The drug could be used safely, so long as kidney function is stable and not severely impaired," he said. Despite warnings, many doctors are already prescribing metformin to patients with kidney disease, the study published in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed. "Many in the field know that metformin can be used cautiously in patients who have mild to moderate kidney problems," Inzucchi said. "Most specialists do this all the time." Still, the researchers said their findings are significant because many doctors stop prescribing metformin once their patients g Continue reading >>

Is Metformin Safe During Breastfeeding?

Is Metformin Safe During Breastfeeding?

Are you a nursing mom suffering from diabetes? Do you have any obesity issues and are you looking to get into shape? Metformin can be the answer! But is it safe to consume while you are breastfeeding? Read our post and learn whether is metformin safe while breastfeeding. What Is Metformin? Metformin is one of the most effective and safe treatments for type 2 diabetes. Patients typically consume the drug alone or with other medications, such as insulin, to treat diabetes. Metformin falls in ‘biguanides’ class of drugs. Apart from regulating the blood sugar levels, metformin offers numerous other health benefits (1). [ Read: Safe Medicines While Breastfeeding ] Health Benefits While Breastfeeding: Here we list some of the health benefits of consuming metformin while breastfeeding. 1. Regulates Blood Sugar Level: Metformin helps control the amount of sugar in the blood of lactating moms. The drug also reduces the quantity of glucose that you absorb from your food and the quantity of glucose that your liver produces. Metformin also raises your body’s response to insulin, the naturally-occurring chemical that regulates glucose in your blood (2). [ Read: Is It Safe To Take Painkillers While Breastfeeding ] 2. Treats Metabolic Syndrome: Women who suffer from metabolic syndrome and face obesity issues post delivery. As obesity leads to excess weight accumulation in the belly, the lactating mother can develop insulin resistance. As a result, she may suffer from type 2 diabetes. Metformin lowers the insulin resistance and helps women suffering from metabolic syndrome lose weight (3). 3. Prevents The Risk Of Heart Problems And Stroke: Consuming metformin helps reduce triglyceride levels and LDL cholesterol levels in nursing mothers. Low triglyceride and LDL cholesterol level Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin Used For And Is It Safe?

What Is Metformin Used For And Is It Safe?

Metformin is considered the gold standard for type 2 diabetes treatment and is used alongside diet and exercise to help lower blood sugar. It works by helping to improve your body’s response to insulin. It also decreases the production of sugar in the liver and prevents absorption of sugar in the digestive tract. Metformin is sometimes also used to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome and obesity, and to prevent diabetes in those people who are at risk. However, these uses are “off label,” meaning they are not approved by the FDA. Is metformin safe? There are many adverse effects associated with using metformin, and some can be serious. The most common adverse effects involve gastrointestinal symptoms; one study found that young people using metformin had a 26% chance of having gastrointestinal symptoms, double the chance of those in the control group.[1] Common side effects of metformin include: Stomach and abdominal discomfort Diarrhea Gas Nausea Bloating Reduced appetite Heartburn Headache If any of these side effects are severe or persist, talk with your doctor. Stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately if you experience any of these more rare, but very serious side effects: Chest pain Rash Tiredness Lightheaded Shortness of breath Irregular heartbeat Sever muscle pain Weakness Some of these symptoms could be associated with a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis, which can in rare cases be caused by metformin use. Metformin alters gut bacteria A recent study found that some of the effects – both good and bad – associated with metformin have to do with the way the drug alters gut bacterial communities. While some changes made by metformin on the microbiome may aid in its therapeutic, blood-sugar-lowering effects, other chang Continue reading >>

Does Turmeric / Curcumin Interact With Metformin ? Can You Take Them Together

Does Turmeric / Curcumin Interact With Metformin ? Can You Take Them Together

No adverse interactions have been reported between metformin and turmeric spice. Thus, dietary turmeric and metformin, when taken together, do not pose the risk of any adverse health effects. However, when taking supplemental dosages of turmeric (curcumin) or the golden paste, a gap of about 3-4 hours is recommended with metformin. In fact, curcumin, an active ingredient in turmeric and the drug metformin, both assist in treatment, management and prevention of type 2 diabetes and cancer. [1] Turmeric, when taken with metformin, may give better results in diabetes and can inhibit the side effects of this drug. Read: Benefits of Turmeric in Diabetes Read: Benefits of Turmeric in Pre-diabetes Care should be taken when taking turmeric with metformin, as high dosage could lower blood glucose and may result in hypoglycemia. Turmeric and Metformin 1. Turmeric does not interact with metformin There are hardly any studies which prove that turmeric may alter the functioning of metformin or vice-versa. However, there are many studies in which curcumin, the active ingredient of turmeric has been used along with metformin with positive results and no reported adverse effects. In one such study, turmeric was given in combination with metformin to diabetes patients, and it contributed to decreased glucose and lipid levels and an improved antioxidant activity. It was concluded that turmeric could be used as an effective adjuvant in treating diabetes. [2] Due to the combined effects of curcumin and metformin in reducing glucose levels, an adduct consisting of curcumin and metformin together was synthesised to benefit the treatment of diabetes. [3] Curcumin and metformin in combination have also been used for the treatment of various types of cancers including breast, liver, prostate and Continue reading >>

Metaglip Patient Information Including Side Effects

Metaglip Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Metaglip Generic Name: glipizide and metformin (Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min) What is the most important information I should know about glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? What is glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion, swelling or rapid weight gain; pain or burning with urination; nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your Continue reading >>

Glimepiride Side Effects

Glimepiride Side Effects

What Is Glimepiride (Amaryl)? Glimepiride is the generic name of the prescription drug Amaryl, used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Glimepiride belongs to a class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and helps the body use insulin more efficiently. The drug can also decrease the chances that someone will develop life-threatening complications of type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved by the FDA in 1995 and is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Glimepiride comes in tablet form and is usually taken once a day. It may be used alone, or in combination with insulin or another oral medication such as metformin. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase your dose if needed. If you've taken glimepiride for a long period of time, the drug may not control blood sugar as well as it did when you first started the treatment. Your doctor will adjust the dosage as needed. Glimepiride Warnings Glimepiride helps control blood sugar, but it will not cure your diabetes. You should continue to take glimepiride even if you feel well. This medication should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce insulin. Glimepiride will only help lower blood sugar if your body produces insulin naturally. In one study, patients who took a medication similar to glimepiride to treat diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than those who were treated with diet changes and insulin. Talk to your doctor about the risks of this treatment. While taking glimepiride, you should tell your doctor if you: Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding Are having surgery, including dental surgery Have ever had G6PD deficiency (a genetic blood diso Continue reading >>

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin is not usually prescribed for Type 1 diabetes, but over the past couple years, inspired in part by Mike’s experience on it (see here, here, here and here), I’ve become interested in trying it. Not only has it been in widespread use as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes since its approval in 1994, but it’s currently being investigated for potential cognitive and anti-cancer benefits as well. As Mike has asked, “Could metformin be the new aspirin?” The typical explanation for why metformin is not prescribed to people with Type 1 diabetes is that metformin increases your insulin sensitivity — and given that, by definition, people with Type 1 don’t make any insulin, it won’t help them. But I see two obvious holes in that logic. First, people with Type 1 diabetes do have insulin in their bodies; it’s just administered in a different way (i.e. injected subcutaneously, rather than secreted by the pancreas). And as anyone who’s struggled with the dawn phenomenon knows, people with Type 1 diabetes experience insulin resistance, too. And second, metformin does more than just affect insulin sensitivity. It also appears to regulate the genes responsible for causing the liver to release glucose into your blood. As you may know, your pancreas and your liver work closely together to maintain a proper level of glucose in the blood. When you’ve got a lot of glucose in your blood, your pancreas secretes insulin to remove it (provided you don’t have Type 1 diabetes!). And when you don’t have sufficient external glucose – like when you’re sleeping — your liver releases some stored glucose so that your blood sugar does not drop too low. To put this a different way, insulin is what keeps a non-diabetic person’s blood glucose from getting too high; the Continue reading >>

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

What type of drug is Metformin Metformin is a Generic name for a drug with antihyperglycemic properties that is used for treating non – insulin – dependent diabetes mellitus. This drug can improve glucose levels in blood by decreasing the production of glucose in liver, decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose and increasing insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Therapy with metformin may also decrease the risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or other diabetes-related complications. Metformin can induce weight loss and that’s why it is the drug of choice for obese patients with diabetes type two. When it is used alone, this drug doesn’t cause hypoglycemia as side effect; but, it may potentiate the hypoglycemic effects of sulfonylureas drugs and insulin if they are used together. Metformin is available in the form of tablet in following dosage forms: 500, 750, 850 and 1000 mg. It is usually taken during meals. Common Brand names on the market containing metformin as an active ingredient are: Glucophage, Glumetza, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Metformin Sandoz, Diabex, Diaformin, Siofor, Metfogamma and Riomet. What is Januvia Januvia is a Brand name for a drug containing sitagliptin as an active ingredient. It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control sugar levels in blood. Januvia works by regulating insulin levels that body produces after eating. This drug is used for the treatment of patints with type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used in combination with other diabetes medicines, but is not used for treating type 1- diabetes. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis should not use Januvia. Januvia is available in tablet and film-coated tablet form in following strenghts: 25, 50 and 100 mg. Common Brand names on the market containing sitagliptin as an active ingredie Continue reading >>

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin is the first-line drug of choice in the treatment of type II diabetes. It was first approved in Europe in 1958.1 Americans had to wait until 1994 to legally obtain metformin.1 The holdup in approving metformin goes beyond the FDA. It is an indictment of a political/legal system that will forever cause needless suffering and death unless substantively changed. When Life Extension® informed Americans about drugs like metformin in the 1980s, the FDA did everything in its power to incarcerate me and shut down our Foundation.2 FDA propaganda at the time was that consumers needed to be "protected" against "unproven" therapies. As history has since proven, the result of the FDA's embargo has been unparalleled human carnage. So called "consumer protection" translated into ailing Americans being denied access to therapies that the FDA now claims are essential to saving lives. Today's major problem is not drugs available in other countries that Americans can't access. Instead, it is a political/legal system that suffocates medical innovation. Headline news stories earlier this year touted the anti-cancer effects of metformin, data that Foundation members were alerted to long ago.3 The problem is that it is illegal for metformin manufacturers to promote this drug to cancer patients or oncologists. It's also illegal to promote metformin to healthy people who want to reduce their risk of cancer, diabetes, vascular occlusion, and obesity. This fatal departure from reality continues unabated, as our dysfunctional political/legal system denies information about metformin that could spare countless numbers of lives. Type II diabetics suffer sharply higher rates of cancer4-7and vascular disease.8-11 The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been shown in numerous scientific studies Continue reading >>

Berberine For Diabetes – Is It A Natural Alternative To Metformin?

Berberine For Diabetes – Is It A Natural Alternative To Metformin?

Incidence of insulin resistance, obesity, and other metabolic diseases have reached massive proportions in our culture. The current popular glucose-lowering drug treatment, Metformin comes with some potential serious side effects. However, there is a natural Metformin alternative that can help the body efficiently process sugar, thereby being safer than pharmaceutical interventions. It’s known as Berberine. What is Berberine and Where Does it Come From? Berberine is a plant photochemical that’s found in several different plants, including goldenseal, European barberry, phellodendron, goldthread, Oregon grape, and tree turmeric. It possesses powerful anti-diabetic properties, as well as being anti-bacterial and immune system enhancing. As well as diabetes it can be used as a treatment for a number of other health problems including hyperlipidemia, heart disease, and cancer. It can regulate blood glucose, increase insulin sensitivity as well as metabolizing fats (burning fat). Berberine has been widely studied, with nearly 1000 studies published on it in the last 5 years alone. There is a body of evidence supporting it’s efficacy in lowering blood-glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity for both humans and animals. However, Berberine is not a new discovery. For thousands of years the Chinese and Ayurvedic communities has been aware of the amazing benefits of Berberine. The blood-sugar lowering effects have been documented in China and India for hundreds of years. Although it was primarily used for treating inflammation, infections, and diarrhea, as diabetes was not as common then as it is now (1). A Natural Substitute For Metformin? However, as the incidence of diabetes has grown, the recent studies have focused on it’s ability to treat the condition. The studi Continue reading >>

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Should you take metformin -- nor not? Is there a better alternative? This page will answer your questions. It's an anti-diabetic drug sometimes used to treat PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), although it is used chiefly to help control Type 2 diabetes. This drug offers both benefits and significant risks. Free PCOS Newsletter The FDA has approved it only for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Because of this limitation, some physicians don't have much clinical experience using Glucophage to treat PCOS and don't always feel comfortable using it unless you have diabetes. 13 Side Effects of Metformin Your Doctor Didn't Tell You About Did you know that metformin has at least 13 under-recognized side effects? Some of them can be serious. Read more about the side effects. Can't Tolerate It? Try This! Medical research is now showing that there are natural alternatives to this and other drugs for treating PCOS, diabetes or metabolic syndrome. So if you're uncomfortable with the idea of taking Glucophage for years to come, or you've tried it but can't tolerate its side effects, take a look at the natural alternatives that are just as effective as metformin. Does It Reduce PCOS Symptoms? Some medical guidelines say it is not the first thing you should try for controlling PCOS. However, it may be helpful IF you have insulin resistance. Read more... Take Supplemental Vitamin B12! Recent research is showing that you will develop a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take this drug for over a year or so. A deficiency in vitamin B12 could have undesirable consequences if for fetal development if you're pregnancy or trying to become pregnant. Read more... Is It Appropriate for Girls? As girls and teenagers start to have trouble with their weight, irregular periods, early appearance of public Continue reading >>

Dr. Keith Roach: Is Metformin A Lifetime Medication?

Dr. Keith Roach: Is Metformin A Lifetime Medication?

DEAR DR. ROACH: I have been taking metformin 500 mg once daily for several months, with little results. I am in my 70s, and overweight by 25 pounds. My average sugar level is still around 160. I read that metformin will drop your glucose level by only 20 percent. Will that percentage increase if I take more? If so, by how much? Do I have to take metformin for the rest of my life? Will my body ever correct itself? — R.I. ANSWER: Average sugar level, also called estimated average glucose, is a way to describe blood sugar control in people with diabetes or prediabetes. A level of 160 is equivalent to an A1c level (a more commonly used measure of blood sugar control) of about 7.2 percent This is a reasonable level for most people in their 70s, where lower levels (“tighter” control) increase the risk for dangerously low blood sugars. Most medicines are more effective at higher doses. For metformin, 500 mg twice daily is the most common dose I see. Although it can be dosed up to 1,000 mg twice daily, it’s not much more effective in most people, and is more likely to cause side effects, especially nausea. Not everybody with Type 2 diabetes needs to be on medicine forever. Losing weight, exercising regularly and having a prudent diet with small amounts of simple sugars all may help treat diabetes, and I have had many patients stop all their diabetes medications when adhering to these recommendations. Readers may email Dr. Roach questions to [email protected] or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Metformin Forever

Metformin Forever

**Metformin controls the insulin resistance of people who have type 2 diabetes so well that, if possible, all of us should be taking it. That’s what Roderic Crist, M.D., told me at the annual convention of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians in Denver this weekend. Dr. Crist specializes in family medicine in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. "Not everybody can take every drug," he added, when I followed up our conversation by calling him at his office after he returned home. "But most of the time people can take metformin if they take it carefully." Doctors increasingly prescribe it not only for type 2 diabetes but also for insulin resistance, polycystic ovary syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Roughly one-third of Dr. Crist’s patients have diabetes. Well over half, if not two-thirds of the people he sees are insulin resistant. "I treat insulin resistance with that drug even if they aren’t fully diabetic." he says. "If they have high triglyceride levels and low HDL levels, particularly if they are centrally obese, they should probably be on metformin. It helps slow the progression of the disease from one thing to the next." But he goes further. He prescribes metformin to almost all of his patients who have type 2 diabetes – no matter how low their A1C level is. And he tells his patients that their levels should be 5.0 or less – not the American Diabetes Association’s less stringent recommendation of 7.0 or less. "If their A1C is at 5, their diabetes is in complete remission. So I have that as a goal." And he still prescribes metformin to them after they reach that goal. "The two important issues are that it will prevent progression and it should be used in the earliest phases of insulin resistance. We vastly underutilize metformin." But he has Continue reading >>

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