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Is Melon Good For Diabetics?

Can I Eat Watermelon If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Watermelon If I Have Diabetes?

Watermelon is typically a summertime favorite. Although you may want to dish some of the sweet treat up at every meal, or make it your go-to summer snack, it’s important to check the nutritional information first. If you have diabetes, you know how important it is to watch what you eat and monitor your blood sugar levels. Watermelon is loaded with natural sugars. Depending on your overall diet, this may have an impact on your blood sugar level. Keep reading to learn how adding watermelon to your diet may impact you. Native to West Africa, watermelon is a wonderful source of vitamins and minerals that include: vitamin A vitamin C potassium magnesium vitamin B-6 fiber iron calcium One 280 gram serving provides 31 percent of the daily recommended amount of vitamin A. This supports healthy vision and aids in the upkeep of your heart, kidneys, and lungs. Vitamin C is also beneficial to a healthy diet and found in large amounts per 280 gram serving. A single serving of watermelon provides 37 percent of your daily recommended intake. Vitamin C has been known to improve heart health, aid in the prevention of some cancers, and help battle symptoms of the common cold. Because it’s high in fiber, eating watermelon can help your body flush out toxins and promote good digestive health. Not only can eating moderate amounts of watermelon curb your craving for something sweet, it can also keep you feeling full longer. This is because watermelon is over 90 percent water. In addition to keeping you hydrated, this can help you stick to your diet and aid in weight management. There isn’t any research directly connecting watermelon consumption and diabetes management. That said, there is some evidence to suggest that eating watermelon may help reduce your risk for certain diabetes-rel Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Melons? | Diabetic Connect

Can Diabetics Eat Melons? | Diabetic Connect

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Theres nothing better than a juicy piece of cold watermelon, cantaloupe, or honeydew melon. While melon is refreshing and full of water, it can also be full of sugar and carbs and can cause a rise in blood sugar. As with any carbohydrate-containing food, theres no need to restrict, but its beneficial for blood sugar management if you have an idea of how many carbs are in that melon bowl or melon slice you eat. Not only do melons contain both water and carbohydrate, but they are also plentiful in vitamins and phytochemicals. So yes, they are good for you (just like any fruit or vegetable in moderation)! But how much makes a serving? Most melons contain about 15 grams of carbs in a one-cup serving. If you havent measured a cup of melon before, it would be a good idea to do so. This will help you train your eye to know what a one-cup serving looks like. So, if you like to eat a slice right off the melon, cut off your normal portion. But instead of eating it right away, cut it up and measure out one cup. And remember to do the math if you are eating more or less than one cup! Specific carb counts of various melons (one-cup serving): Cantaloupe: 14 g carbs, 1.4 g fiber, 12.3 g sugar Watermelon: 12 g carbs, 0.6 g fiber, 9.4 g sugar Honeydew: 11 g carbs, 1 g fiber, 10.2 g sugar Casaba: 11 g carbs, 1.5 g fiber, 9.7 g sugar Since theres more sugar in melon than fiber, theres not much to slow down the digestion and absorption of sugar into the bloodstream once you eat the melon, especially if you are eating it without any other foods. In this way, the fruit would be consi Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Bitter melon is also known as karela, bitter gourd, balsam apple, African cucumber and ampalaya. Botanically, this plant is known as Momordica charantia – it is a member of the gourd family, along with its cousins, pumpkin, acorn squash and zucchini. The plant itself is a tropical vine and looks a bit like a very warty cucumber! Bitter melon has been used in a number of traditional medicines as a treatment for diabetes. Analysis of bitter melon indicates that it is very high in antioxidants, a protein that seems to be active against tumor cells, [1] enzymes and fatty acids. It also contains charantin, which appears to be responsible for its effects on blood sugar, vicine and a substance which appears to mimic insulin—polypeptide p. What is the Evidence that Bitter Melon Can Benefit Diabetes? There are two main lines of evidence that bitter melon could potentially be useful in treating diabetes. These two lines of evidence are that bitter melon can lower blood sugar levels and lower blood triglyceride levels. These studies indicated that this can happen in cells, animal studies and in some human studies. At this point, the evidence is limited, but very promising because bitter melon appears to be safe in clinical studies and because of the long-term history of bitter melon as a food—and as a traditional medicine for diabetes. There is one major safety exception, however—any individual with a condition known as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In these individuals, the vicine can, in theory, cause a form of anemia, headaches, fever, stomach pain and possibly coma. A recent paper compared the effect of bitter melon and metformin in newly diagnosed T2D patients and found that bitter melon (at either 500, 1000 or 2000 mg per day) was effective at Continue reading >>

What Fruits Can A Person With Type Ii Diabetes Eat?

What Fruits Can A Person With Type Ii Diabetes Eat?

Question Originally asked by Community Member jesse perez What Fruits Can A Person With Type Ii Diabetes Eat? Is eating a cantaloupe bad for person with Type II Diabetes? What fruits are best? Answer Specifically, eating cantaloupe isn’t bad for a person with Diabetes. However, you do have to eat fruit in moderation. Fruit has a lot of sugar and counted as a carbohydrate in your diabetic exchange list count. Sugars (and therefore fruit) should not be more than 10 percent of your daily carbohydrate intake. Fructose, the sugar found in fruits, may produce a slower increase in blood sugar than sucrose. Dark-colored fruits are rich in important vitamins and other nutrients. Other fruits, such as apples and grapes also have important beneficial food chemicals. People with diabetes should avoid products listing more than 5 grams of sugar per serving, and some doctors recommend limiting fruit intake. If specific amounts are not listed, patients should avoid products with either sucrose or fructose listed as one of the first four ingredients on the label. The best thing to do is test your bg’s before and after you eat fruit to determine how much you should eat. The key is moderation, and to maintain a well-rounded diabetes diet. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Watermelon?

Can Diabetics Eat Watermelon?

Like all fruits, watermelon contains plenty of natural sugar. While watermelon is usually safe for someone with diabetes to eat as part of their diet, how much and how often they can do so depends on several factors. People with diabetes are aware of the need to educate themselves about the right kinds of foods to eat to maintain stable blood sugar levels. Eating a diet high in fruit and vegetables is advisable, but fruit contains natural sugars, and so it can be confusing to work out how much a person with diabetes can eat. The American Diabetes Association recommend that "there is no single ideal dietary distribution of calories among carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for people with diabetes, macronutrient distribution should be individualized while keeping total calorie and metabolic goals in mind." There is not a simple "yes" or "no" answer about whether fruits, such as watermelon, are healthful for people who have diabetes. In this article, we look at the nutritional and health benefits of watermelon, as well as other factors a person with diabetes should consider. Health benefits of watermelon Watermelon is a refreshing, juicy fruit and is a common healthful food choice in the summer. But what does it contain? Watermelon is an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, including: vitamin A vitamin C vitamin B1 and B6 fiber iron lycopene Vitamin A helps to keep the heart, kidney, and lungs functioning properly. It also supports vision and eye health. A 280 g serving of watermelon provides 31 percent of a person's recommended daily amount of vitamin A. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and promotes a healthy immune system. A good immune system can reduce colds and infections, and may help prevent certain types of cancer. One 280 g serving of watermelon provides 3 Continue reading >>

A Melon For Dieters And Diabetics

A Melon For Dieters And Diabetics

Mention watermelon and people immediately think of sweet, juicy, crimson-colored fruit. But watermelons didn't start that way, notes Angela R. Davis of the U.S. Agricultural Research Service. Wild watermelons in their native Africa are white fleshed, the size of softballs, and "hard like softballs," she notes. Bitter and anything but sweet, watermelons hardly started as dessert. On the other hand, U.S. domesticated watermelons are so sweet that they tend to be off-limits to most of the nation's 20 million people with diabetes. People adhering to low-carb diets also shun the fruit. So, Davis, a melon geneticist and enthusiast, embarked on developing a low-sugar alternative to the standard U.S. supermarket melon. She started by screening a host of noncommercial melons, including many that retained some of their wild traits. "The project took a lot longer than we expected," she says. "Because there's a correlation between color and sugar content," low-sugar variants that the researchers initially foundincluding some wild varietieshad unappetizingly white flesh inside. However, Davis' team eventually ran across one melon that bore yellow flesh and little sugar. Seven generations of crossbreeding progeny of this melon yielded two lines of fruit whose seeds now uniformly grow into pink, low-sugar melons. Another, even redder line produces melons with midlevel sugar content. Davis' group, based in Lane, Okla., describes these new melons in a pair of papers slated to be published later this year in HortScience. The new melons may not start out sweet enough to satisfy everyone's taste. However, adding a dash of artificial sweetener usually takes care of the problem, Davis finds. Indeed, in one taste test her group conducted, people eating the melons actually preferred a low-sug Continue reading >>

Cantaloupe/musk Melon - Defeat Diabetes Foundation

Cantaloupe/musk Melon - Defeat Diabetes Foundation

Cantaloupe is a species of musk melon, as are honey dew and casaba melons. All musk melons are part of the larger botanical family Cucurbitaceae, which includes almost all species of squashes and melons. Cantaloupe is principally cultivated in two varieties; the North American cantaloupe, Cucumis melo reticulatus, and the European cantaloupe, Cucumis melo cantalupensis. The North American cantaloupe can be distinguished by its skin, which has the geometric configuration of a net (hence the name reticulatus). The skin of the European cantaloupe is slightly ribbed and has a pale-green skin. Both varieties have solid orange flesh with medium sweetness, and a high content of water. Though cantaloupe was not officially called as such until the 17th century, when traders brought the seeds from Armenia to farmers in the commune of Cantalupo, Italy, the fruit itself has been cultivated for thousands of years. Its natural origins are up for debate, with Persia being the most widely held consensus. Northern Africa (where many wild melons and squash grow) and India are also possibilities. In all of these ancient civilizations, cantaloupe was consumed at least 4,000 years ago. The introduction of cantaloupes and other musk melons to the New World was, like with many other crops, done through the second voyage of Christopher Columbus in 1493-1494. Cantaloupe is now grown worldwide. China is by far the largest producer of cantaloupe (and most other melons), followed by Turkey, Iran, Egypt and the United States. The nomenclature of cantaloupe also varies, with South Africans calling it spanspek and Australians and New Zealanders calling it rock melon. Cantaloupe seeds are also a nutritious snack food that are popular throughout Latin America, the Middle East and Asia. Cantaloupes are Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic Patients Eat Muskmelon And Watermelon?

Can Diabetic Patients Eat Muskmelon And Watermelon?

Yes, a diabetic patient can have watermelon and muskmelon. Both the fruits are a powerhouse of health. Both have a super high percentage of water content in them and hence making them cooling and hyderating. Both helps in regulating the blood sugar levels and thereby helping control diabetes. There are many more benefits of both the fruits like, Controls blood pressure Low on cholestrol Treat ulcers Prevents heart diseases Prevents risk of cancer Boosts immunity Helps in weight loss And the list goes on…… Mango, grapes, chiku and banana The above mentioned fruits have high content of sugar in them. So except these fruits, a diabetic patient can eat almost all fruits but in limited quantity. Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

What Fruits Should Diabetics Avoid?

What Fruits Should Diabetics Avoid?

Fruits often get a bad reputation in the world of diabetes, and many believe they are completely off-limits. While fruits are a source of carbohydrates -- the nutrient responsible for affecting blood sugar -- their carbs are from natural sugar and can be incorporated into a healthy meal plan. However, like all carbohydrates, they should be consumed strategically for the person with diabetes. Some fruits will affect blood sugar more than others, because of their higher glycemic index. Video of the Day Both the American Diabetes Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommend that people with diabetes consume a varied diet with foods from all food groups, including fruit. Most fruits are a good source of fiber, which actually helps control blood sugar and is necessary for digestive health. The fiber in fruit may even help lower cholesterol, high levels of which tend to go hand in hand with diabetes. Additionally, fruits contain many vitamins, minerals and antioxidants necessary for good general health and disease prevention. While there is little dispute regarding the benefits of fruit in a healthy diet, many find that fruits with a higher glycemic index raise blood sugars more. The glycemic index, or GI, is a numerical system that measures a food's effect on blood sugar compared to pure glucose, of which the reference point is 100. Foods with a value of 55 or less are considered low GI; those with a value of 56 to 69 are medium; and 70 or more are high. High GI fruits include melons, pineapple and very ripe bananas, while the vast majority fall into the low and medium categories. Juices have a higher GI because of liquid's ability to be a absorbed more rapidly into the bloodstream and their lack of fiber. Portion Sizes Still Matter Although the GI may be Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

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