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Is Masoor Dal Good For Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

To live a long and healthy life with Diabetes, following diet and exercise are very important along with medication. Diabetic diet is not different from normal diet; however some modifications need to be done for the normal diet Dietary Guidelines Eat more Vegetables: Eat more locally available and seasonal vegetables. Take them as curry, raita, and in raw form. Include green leafy vegetables regularly in the diet. Vegetables; contain fibre and many vitamins and minerals which are helpful in control of diabetes and to maintain good health. Eat variety of foods: for better control of blood sugar instead of using only rice include other grains like wheat, jowar, ragi or unpolished; rice in the diet, eating only white rice is not going to help to control Blood sugar. More of whole Grains: Include whole dals like moong dal and channa dal in everyday diet. Use less oil: Diabetic person is at higher risk of hear disease, it is advisable o reduce the consumption of oil for cooking. Restricted amount of oil for cooking and not preparing the vegetables in fried forms will help to consume less amount of oil. Traditionally used oils like groundnut and gingelly oil are good for health. Ghee, butter, coconut oil contain different type of fats, (which may increase cholesterol) and should be taken in small quantities. Use less salt: usually Indian diet is rich in salt, especially when using pickles, papad and adding more salt to food is quite common. Normally people with diabetes may also get Hypertension (B.P) and it is better to restrict the intake of pickles, papad and adding less salt while cooking food. Use of Eggs/ Non veg: Fish contains special type of oil which helps in blood sugar management, so consumption of fish is encouraged 3-4 times a week. Chicken also contain less fat Continue reading >>

Ideal Breakfast For Diabetics

Ideal Breakfast For Diabetics

People are increasingly developing diabetes today and only half of them have their blood sugar in control. But, eating right can easily control it. The ideal breakfast for diabetics should have a low glycemic index. Read on for more. People are increasingly developing diabetes today and only half of them have their blood sugar in control. But, eating right can easily control it. The ideal breakfast for diabetics should have a low glycemic index. Eating breakfast increases mental ability while skipping it causes irritability, restlessness and low energy. Certain whole grains like barley, rye and oats also help in keeping blood sugar stable. These grains work better when had with proteins. So, your ideal breakfast can look like: Two to three egg whites with one to two slices of whole wheat bread and a glass of mint and coriander juice A glass of low-fat milk with wheat flakes and five to eight almonds A bowl of oatmeal porridge with vegetables or with milk and a handful of walnut (three to four) You can make chapatis with whole grain flour, stuff them with radish, green moong sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli and eat with low-fat curd. Other options include besan chilla, moong dal chilla, sprouts bhel, wheat dalia with dal and vegetables. Some recipes for a diabetes-friendly breakfast: Broken wheat upma — Cook broken wheat upma with veggies and onions. Also, you can add ginger and green chillies for flavour. It makes a good low-sugar breakfast for diabetics. Bran biscuits are made with wheat flour and bran in 3:1 ratio. Add little cow’s ghee, salt and jeera seeds. Mix to form smooth dough. Roll into a 0.5-inch thick slab. Cut into the desired shape and bake at 200 degrees Celsius for 15-20 minutes. Enjoy them with green chutney and cucumber and tomato slices. Vermicelli Continue reading >>

Dal Or Lentils – Packing A Healthy Punch

Dal Or Lentils – Packing A Healthy Punch

Dal or lentil is a staple food of India and most Indian vegans and vegetarians get their protein from it. We are blessed with a variety of dals and pulses which add a distinct taste to our diets. While they form an essential part of our meals, each one of them have their distinct health benefits. Nutritionist Neha Chandna tells us the various benefits of popular dals consumed in India. Dal basics All dals have 70% carbohydrates and 30% proteins. But these proteins are not complete proteins as found in non-vegetarian foods. When combined with roti/ rice, the dals become complete protein sources which is excellent for vegetarians to meet their protein needs and maintain muscle health. 30g of raw dal gives 7g of protein. Dals also have resistant starch which acts like fibre in the body and helps control blood sugar levels, clears bowels, aids in weight loss, etc. Health benefits of dals Toor dal: A very popular and preferred dal in India, toor dal is light and yummy. Apart from protein and fibre, it contains folic acid which helps prevent anaemia and is also important for pregnant women as it is essential for foetal development and can help prevent neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida. It is low in calories so is good for people who are on weight loss diets. It also helps control blood sugar levels. Moong dal: When you think of dal rice, the first thing that comes to your mind is moong dal which is commonly known as yellow dal. It is used for making the legendary dal tadka and dal fry. It is eaten on a regular basis in every indian household in combination with rice and vegetables. Moong dal is a dieter-friendly dal rich in iron and potassium. Iron helps maintain haemoglobin levels and potassium helps reduce blood pressure, a boon for hypertensive people. It is e Continue reading >>

10 Types Of Dals And Their Health Benefits

10 Types Of Dals And Their Health Benefits

Dals are very commonly used in the Indian cuisine. It is hard to find an Indian household that does not stock up different types dals. As dals have to prepared on a daily basis, we need to have a lot of dals on board to maintain the variety. Besides dals are types of pulses that have many nutritional values. The health benefits of dals in general is that they are very rich in proteins. As many Indians are vegetarians, these different types of pulses provide them with main source of vegan proteins. That is why, all the different types of dals are very important for the typical Indian diet. Apart from the general health benefits of dals, each type of dal has its own set of nutritional values. So it is advisable to have a mix of all these dals in your diet. Some types of dals are healthier when compared to others. For example, the black gram dal and moong dal are hailed has the healthiest among the dals. Others like masoor dal have health benefits too but they also have some side effects. For example, masoor dal raises your uric acid levels so you must limit its consumption. So here are some types of dals and their exclusive health benefits. Masoor dal is very good for people suffering from bile reflux, and it also improves the blood circulation in the body. Around The Web More From BoldSky Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

5 Diabetic-friendly Recipes To Try

5 Diabetic-friendly Recipes To Try

India is fast becoming the diabetes capital of the world with 69.1 million cases reported, the second-highest number in the world, according to the International Diabetes Federation. Keeping diabetes under control is essential to living a long and healthy life. The right diet and diabetic recipes play an extremely important role in keeping blood sugar levels under control. Diabetics must include a lot of low glycemic index foods – those that lead to a steady rise in the level of glucose in the blood and a gentle rise in insulin – in their diet. Choose foods that are low in fat and calories and high in fiber and proteins. Moderation is key; eat everything in moderate quantities and try to include lots of vegetables in your diet to increase the fiber content. The fiber slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream, preventing blood sugar spikes that worsen blood sugar control and make you feel hungry. That said, low-carb, low-sugar meals don’t have to be boring. Try these five recipes and you’ll see. Savoury Pancakes Ingredients ½ cup oats ½ cup atta ½ cup curd ¼ tsp soda 1 finely chopped onion 1 tbsp chopped cabbage 1 tbsp chopped zucchini A tsp of chopped coriander leaves Salt and pepper to taste Method Grind oats, add atta, curd, baking soda, salt & pepper, and mix well. Add onions, carrots and zucchini to the mix. Pour some water if required to improve the consistency. Make pancakes on a non-stick tawa. Serve hot. Hariyali Dosa Ingredients 1/2 cup broken wheat (dalia) 1/4 cup green moong dal 2 tbsp masoor dal 2 tbsp urad dal 1 tsp methi seeds 1/4 cup finely chopped onions A pinch of asafoetida (hing) 1/4 tsp turmeric powder 1 tbsp finely chopped coriander 1 tbsp chopped curry leaves 1 tbsp chopped green onions 1 tbsp chopped coriander 1 tbsp chopped di Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Indian Recipes

Gestational Diabetes Indian Recipes

Gestational Diabetes is very common in Indian women. I think gestational diabetes diet is one of the best diets to be on while pregnant, as you truly get to eat the correct balance of proteins, carbohydrates and fat. Gestational diabetes diet appears that even women with normal pregnancy would benefit from following it. First of all, I think it would prevent them from gaining excess weight. Second, eating six mini meals throughout the day keeping their bundle of joy continually nurtured and finally, they are teaching their kids how to eat right, right from the beginning. Introduce high fiber and lots of green foods in your diet. Fresh and leafy vegetables, whole grain breads, cereals, pulses, beans and fresh fruits should be consumed. I did lot of research during my pregnancy as I had very less choice to eat. I am a food lover, was very tough to control on my food. when I did research I found so many options........ so it was little easy with my second pregnancy. Thought of sharing my recipes with everyone. Exercise: Slow walk for 15 to 20 min. every day activities. Exercise helps a lot to maintain the glucose level. Avoid stress and anxiety, I know its very tough if it is second pregnancy. Try to take some help from your husband. If possible try prenatal yoga class. Few Indian recipes for Gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes diet plan Break fast Meal – 30 grams of Carbohydrates, Any amount of protein, moderated fat. Brunch Snack – 30 grams of Carbohydrates, Any amount of protein, moderated fat. Lunch Meal – 45 grams of Carbohydrates, Any amount of protein, moderated fat. Evening Snack – 30 grams of Carbohydrates, Any amount of protein, moderated fat. Dinner – 45 grams of Carbohydrates, Any amount of protein, moderated fat. Late Night Snack – 30 grams Continue reading >>

Dal, Masoor

Dal, Masoor

PULSES AND DALS Each serving in this Group contains 12 gms. of carbohydrates, 6 gms. of proteins and 1 gram of fat and gives approximately 80 calories. Each serving in the Group is about 25 gms by weight if uncooked and about 1 cup cooked ( thin, watery) or ½ cup cooked ( thick) One serving can be from the following foods: Dal, Masoor Dal, Arhar Dal, Urad Dal, Chana (bengal gram) Dal, Moong ( greengram) Dal, Tur (red gram) Dal, Mooth (mothbeans) Val (field beans) Vatana (peas dry) Cow Pea ( Lobiya) Muth (mothbeans) Moong (greengram) Rajmah Chana ( Bengal Gram) Baked beans Beans Blacked beans Black eyed peas Kidney beans Lentils Lima beans Pinto beans Red beans Refried beans For more food items in this list click here Continue reading >>

Urad Dal - Health Benefits

Urad Dal - Health Benefits

Urad Dal - Health Benefits There are many types of dals that are available in the market. As dals have to be prepared on a daily basis, we need to have a lot of dals on board to maintain the variety. However, you need to focus only on healthy pulses so as to maintain your health and prevent problems. For example, masoor dal raises your uric acid levels so you must limit its consumption. Some types of dals are healthier when compared to other dals. For example, the black gram dal and moong dal are considered healthy as well as nutritious for their amazing properties. We will discuss about the health benefits of urad dal further in this article. Urad dal, also known as white lentil or black lentil is a kind of bean that is grown in the southern parts of Asia. Also known as black dal, urad dal is used as a major ingredient in Indian cuisine for preparing a healthy diet. Both black and yellow urad dal are used for preparing a variety of dals with different flavours. It is highly valued due to its numerous health benefits. For example, Urad dal has protein, fat, and carbohydrates which is required by the body. If you are looking for a protein-friendly diet, then opt for urad dal. This dal is one of the richest sources of proteins and Vitamin B. Urad dal is also good for women as it has iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, potassium which makes it a healthy pulse. Urad dal is also rich in fibre which makes it easy to digest. Some types of dals are good for the heart as well. For example, urad dal benefits the health as it is good for the heart. Consuming urad dal helps to reduce cholesterol and improves cardiovascular health. Moreover, if you are feeling lethargic and lack energy, then have black gram. It is one of the healthy pulses for vegetarians as it boosts energy in th Continue reading >>

Indian Diet Chart For Diabetics To Reverse Diabetes

Indian Diet Chart For Diabetics To Reverse Diabetes

Diet chart for Diabetic patients is not much different from healthy eating style, we have forget the basics our grandmothers told us, Indian cooking is based on Ayurveda which is a 5,000 year-plus-old Indian health science. I can say if you can go back and think what were you eating 30 / 40 years ago and follow the same you will no more need diabetic diet chart to control or reverse your diabetes. reverse your diabetes Ayuvveda is an ancient science which actually discovered how cooking and the time taken to cook can change the composition of a particular food and its effect on the body. few examples are lycopene in tomatoes, which enhances while cooking can be used by the body more effectively. Tempering onion with hing balances the diuretic properties in onion that makes it good for cough and cold and helps in digestion deep frying onions till they turn brown will only make them loose all their nutrients and even cause acidity. That’s why our grand mothers used to recommend frying onions till they turn translucent. Most of our food practices have been passed down from one generation to the next through the oral tradition. This includes what to eat, how to eat, how much to eat and when to stop eating. Now we are asking some one else who really don't know about all these except our Grandmother, Did you ever wonder why food cooked by Grandmother tastes so well and we feel so good after we eat ? this is because Grandmother knows it all. ​My diet chart contains all Indian recipes because I believe in Indian Food wisdom ​No of varieties Cooking sequence Right ingredients Every recipe have more than 10 ingredients, more ingredients - more nutrition - no to garam masala please. Just rewind back to 1970's or 80's and study what were you eating and include them in your fo Continue reading >>

Why Whole Masoor Is Not Hugely Popular In Indian Cooking, Despite Its Exceptional Nutritional Qualities

Why Whole Masoor Is Not Hugely Popular In Indian Cooking, Despite Its Exceptional Nutritional Qualities

If there's one type of ingredient over which Indians could safely claim mastery, its legumes or dals. We almost definitely eat more dals per capita than anyone else; with so many vegetarians, we need their protein. We are among the top producers in the world (despite the government's shameful neglect of the category). We use them in more ways, in innumerable recipes and in their different forms: fresh, dried, whole, split, skinned, ground, roasted or fried as snacks. There are legume varieties in the world which we don't use (like borlotti, anasazi and turtle beans), but of those commonly grown and eaten in India we might well feel that foreigners have nothing to teach us. Masoor dal might prove us wrong. On the face of it this is absurd - masoor is a household staple across India, valued for its quick-cooking ability, even without a pressure cooker. But this is the split, skinned dal, recognisable by its salmon-pink colour; whole or sabut masoor, is also widely cooked, yet seems oddly elusive. Recipes for it are sparse in cookbooks, restaurants rarely serve it (one exception is the Taj President's Konkan Cafe, where recently Chef Ananda Solomon produced a masoor dal with khatta palak that was easily one of the best restaurant dals I've ever eaten) and in grocery shops I often find myself scrabbling behind packets of split masoor, to find the few packets of whole masoor dal. I don't want to pretend there is a huge gourmet fan club abroad for whole masoor, or lentils as they are called. But there is more awareness of its exceptional healthiness, with a great nutritional and fibre profile, and more protein than most major legumes, other than soya, which is hardly as nice or easy to cook. Lentils are a staple of many alternative diets, which hasn't helped their reputation. Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Health Benefits Of

Health Benefits Of Health Benefits Of "red Lentils" (masoor Dal)

Health Benefits Of "Red Lentils" (Masoor Dal) Lentils are a powerhouse of nutrition. They are a good source of potassium, calcium, zinc, niacin and vitamin K, but are particularly rich in dietary fiber, lean protein, folic acid and iron. A single cup of cooked lentils contains 16 grams of dietary fiber. It contains some soluble fiber, but is an outstanding source of insoluble fiber. According to The Cancer Project, a diet that includes plenty of insoluble fiber can regulate bowel movements, promote digestive system health and may significantly decrease the risk of colon, breast, throat and esophageal cancer. Fiber-rich foods like lentils may also help prevent stroke, heart disease, diabetes, high blood cholesterol and hypertension. Cooked lentils provide 18 grams of protein per cup, with less than 1 gram of fat, negligible saturated fat and no cholesterol. Whereas beef, poultry and fish, all of which are good sources of protein but contain much higher amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol. The Harvard School of Public Health names lentils a better protein choice. Each cup of cooked lentils has 358 micrograms of Folic Acid. This amount supplies nearly 100 percent of the 400-microgram daily requirement of folate for adults which supports nervous system health, aids in energy metabolism and is required for the synthesis of DNA, RNA and red blood cells. If your diet lacks adequate folate, you may be more likely to develop cancer, depression, heart disease and age-related vision or hearing loss. It is especially important for pregnant women to include folate-rich foods like lentils in their diets. Pregnant women who eat at least 600 micrograms of folate daily may lessen the risk of their child being born with a birth defect. A cup of lentils provides 87 percent of the iro Continue reading >>

16 Benefits Of Masoor Dal For Health And Skin

16 Benefits Of Masoor Dal For Health And Skin

Most of us are unaware of the fact that our kitchen area is the source to all possible treatments and resources of immense health benefits. From the spices to the small lentils, all of these are loaded with benefits for both the physical as well as the mental health of the human body. One such name in the list of healthy food item that can be easily found in your kitchen area is the “Masoor Dal” or the “Red Lentils”. The red lentils or the Masoor Dal are in great demand in an Indian kitchen as it forms one of the staple diets that is consumed on a daily basis. These small red-colored lentils are packed with immense health benefits. Let us provide you with an insight into the health as well as beauty benefits of Masoor Dal. Benefits for Health: As seen in the nutritional table of the Masoor Dal, these lentils are loaded with essential proteins, fiber, iron and other vital nutrients including amino acids isoleucine and lysine. These are also good sources of potassium, iron, dietary fiber, Folate, 0 fat, vitamin B1, vitamin A, vitamin K, and several others that can help you be at the pinnacle of health. Here are some of the top benefits of Masoor Dal for your health: 1) Prevents Rapid Aging: The red lentils are considered to be the best anti-aging food items. The Masoor Dal is a powerhouse of fiber, protein and other essential nutrients that can boost the immunity of the human body. There is an abundance of anti-oxidants in the red lentils that tend to minimize the cell and tissue damage and also destroy the free radicals. Therefore, when consumed at least 2 to 3 times in a week, the red lentils can help you stay young and lively for a longer duration of time. 2) Effective for Weight Loss: Wish to achieve the desired weight loss? Have you cut down your intake of le Continue reading >>

What Are The Health Benefits Of Toor Dal?

What Are The Health Benefits Of Toor Dal?

Toor dal is also sometimes referred to as lentils or split pigeon peas. This traditional Indian dish is often served with rich spices over rice, and is a staple in many Indian restaurants and households. Toor dal is a member of the legume family, and this meal is not only delicious, it also has a number of health benefits. Video of the Day Toor dal contains folic acid, an important vitamin for all women, especially those planning to become pregnant. Folic acid is essential for fetal development and can help to prevent neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida. Getting adequate amounts of folic acid in your diet can help to reduce specific brain and spinal cord birth defects by more than 70 percent, according to the New York State Department of Health. Protein and Vegetables The United States Department of Agriculture notes that beans and peas such as toor dal can be counted in both the protein and vegetable subgroups of the government's healthy eating plan. This is because legumes such as toor dal are an excellent source of nutrients and plant protein, and they also contain dietary fiber. In essence, legumes are nutritionally similar to poultry, meat and fish, though they represent a low-fat and low-cholesterol alternative. Legumes such as toor dal provide essential nutrients, fiber and protein for vegetarians as well as those who wish to merely limit their meat consumption. Toor dal is also an excellent source of carbohydrates, which your body needs for energy. When you eat food containing carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, or blood sugar. Blood sugar is then used to provide energy to your brain, body and nervous system. Unlike simple carbohydrates, which contain processed and refined sugars with little nutrition, legumes such as toor dal cont Continue reading >>

Pump Up The Pulses To Control Diabetes

Pump Up The Pulses To Control Diabetes

Over 50 per cent of people with pre-diabetes who eat healthier and are physically active can delay or even entirely prevent themselves from becoming diabetic. For those who have type 2 diabetes, eating cooked pulses along with a high-fibre diet can help control long term blood sugar levels. Licensed from CanStockPhoto Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and usually occurs in people over 40. However, in recent years a growing number of younger adults and even children – especially those from South Asian backgrounds – have developed diabetes earlier as a result of inactivity and being overweight. Luckily the body sends early warning signals. Before a person gets diabetes, they usually go through a stage called pre-diabetes. At this stage, they are often overweight, and have high blood glucose (sugar), but it isn't high enough to be considered diabetes. There are no clear symptoms of pre-diabetes, but sometimes people will complain of increased amounts of urine, increased thirst, especially for sugary drinks, or feeling tired or sluggish after meals. These symptoms are often mild and come on gradually, so you may not notice there is something wrong. Having a parent or sibling with diabetes also increases one's risk of becoming diabetic. Once or twice a week, soak (as needed) and cook lentils, beans or chickpeas. Refrigerate or freeze 250 to 500 millilitres (1–2 cups) or more in containers or bags, whichever size is best for your family meals. Give your pulses some pressure – by pressure cooking that is! When using canned pulses with salt, drain and rinse to lower the sodium content by 40 per cent. A doctor can test and confirm when the body's blood glucose levels rise above normal for long periods of time. Approximately half of those with pre-diabet Continue reading >>

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