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Is Lantus Supposed To Be Refrigerated?

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens even if the needle has been changed. Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

Treatment, Most Of Them Do Very Well And Have Decent Quality Life Spans.

Treatment, Most Of Them Do Very Well And Have Decent Quality Life Spans.

Diabetes We have just diagnosed your cat with diabetes. We see a lot of cats with diabetes, and with proper care and Cause and Types:  Every time your cat eats, they ingest glucose in various amounts. To be able to metabolize this glucose, their pancreas secretes insulin, which allows the cells to be able metabolize the glucose.  Diabetes happens when they either are not producing enough insulin, or when their cells are insulin resistant, and require higher levels of insulin to be able to metabolize the glucose.  When glucose cannot be adequately metabolized, it starts to build up in the blood stream, resulting in various problems. This is diabetes, also known as hyperglycemia.  There are two types of diabetes, type I and type II. o Type I diabetes is caused by failure of your cat’s pancreas to produce enough insulin for the body’s needs. There are several factors that can affect this.  Acute or chronic pancreatitis can damage the pancreas enough so that the pancreas can no longer secrete an adequate amount of insulin.  This can also be congenital, although congenital type I diabetes is fairly rare in cats.  Idiopathic is our third cause. Idiopathic is a medical term that means we have absolutely no idea what caused it. o Type II diabetes is when the cells of the body become insulin resistant, and require higher and higher levels of insulin to be able to function.  This is most commonly caused by increased levels of fat. Fat cells produce hormones that can cause insulin resistance, and the more fat cells present, the higher likelihood that insulin resistance requiring treatment will occur.  Regardless of the type and cause, in cats they are both treated the same way. For people with type II dia Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

Insulin Pens Are Welcome Back To The Fridge!

We all know that unopened insulin must be kept in the refrigerator. But once in use can we put it back in the fridge to protect it from excessive heat? The answer to this simple question is not as easy as one might think. All manufacturers explicitly recommend to ‘Not refrigerate’ insulin pens in use. This guideline that causes confusion among users is now being revoked by one manufacturer. Let’s try to understand the reasoning behind it and what it means for users now. What? I shouldn’t put my insulin pen back in the refrigerator? When it comes to storing medications, it is recommended you follow the leaflet or packaging instructions. For insulin in particular, there are two different situations: storing and in-use. · Before Opening: When insulin is to be stored long-term and has not been opened, keeping it in the fridge ensures it lasts until expiration date. · During Use: Once a vial, a cartridge or a new disposable pen are used for the first time, the insulin can be kept at room temperature. But it needs to be used within weeks. It makes sense: higher temperatures and an open product mean a shorter shelf life. But there is one extra sentence on insulin pens packages, which has caused quite some confusion: Pens in use — ‘Do not refrigerate.’ What does ‘do not refrigerate’ mean for users? Let’s take a trip back to 2003, when the recommendation to not refrigerate opened insulin first appeared. Take Lilly’s Humalog for example, for which the label was first altered 14-years ago: What was the reason behind this? People started to speculate this warning was a result of preventing any kind of temperature extremes from affecting the insulin once it is in use. Many insulin users know from experience that high temperature can lower the effectiveness of Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo® is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Toujeo® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Toujeo® contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo® is 300 Units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo® required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus®. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo®, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus®. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label bef Continue reading >>

Tracking Insulin's Health In The Summer Heat

Tracking Insulin's Health In The Summer Heat

Sunscreen: check. Water bottle: check. Beach ball: check. Insulin cooler....? Yep. For those of us who use insulin, summer heat creates an extra level of complexity and worry. The real question we all ask ourselves in the heat of the summer is whether our fun-in-the-sun will cook our insulin and leave us having-not-so-much-fun in an air conditioned ICU unit? There's a whole industry of solutions dedicated to helping us keep our insulin cool, ranging from cooling packs such as the ReliOn and others, to portable fridges, to high tech cooling crystals. Hell, we're even running a Giveaway contest this week in which our readers can win some of these products! With much of the U.S. suffering under a stifling drought-baked summer, the question of just how hot insulin can get is on all our minds. But you have to wonder if these products are serving an important need or just preying on our fears. To find out, we asked the manufacturers themselves, some leading insulin experts, and the American Diabetes Association — and guess what? The answer isn't as clear as you might like. Not Your Grandma's Insulin First, a bit of history: Didn't grandma keep her insulin in the fridge all the time? Well, only if she read the label. The original pork and beef insulin formulations were supposed to be kept cold all the time. As cold insulin stings like hell to inject, the move to being able to keep the newer human insulin and later analogs at room temperature was a great victory (!) for those of us who are human pin cushions. But wait a minute... whose room temperature are we talking about? My father used to get annoyed with me when I'd shovel ice cubes into my glass of red wine. "Wine is supposed to be consumed at room temperature," he'd huff. "Yeah, in the frickin' French Alps,where room te Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin Vial & Solostar Pen Storage Temperature Instructions

Lantus Insulin Vial & Solostar Pen Storage Temperature Instructions

Lantus Insulin Vial & SoloStar Pen Storage Temperature Instructions Lantus comes as a sterile solution, known by its generic name insulin glargine, which is administered subcutaneously in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes . Insulin glargine refers to a long-acting insulin analog that is available as a prescription insulin drug. This insulin has a constant peak time in lowering blood glucose levels and can last over a time period of 24 hours. Insulin glargine is supposed to have a colorless and clear appearance. In case it has changed colors or is cloudy, you should not use it. Your pharmacist will be able to replace it and give you a new one. Lantus comes in vials or a disposable prefilled pen. Lantus Insulin Vial and SoloStar Pen Storage Temperature Instructions An unopened SoloSTAR pen should be refrigerated at temperatures between 2C and 8C or 36F and 46F. It should not be frozen. Make sure you keep Lantus away from direct sunlight and heat. In case the SoloSTAR pen has been overheated or frozen, it should be thrown away. Make sure you keep SoloSTAR pen away from children. Opened SoloSTAR pens should not be refrigerated, but stored at room temperature away from light and heat. The room temperature should be below 30C or 86F. However, make sure you discard in use SoloSTAR pen after 28 days. You should not use the SoloSTAR pen if it has expired. Unopened Lantus vials should be refrigerated at temperatures between 36F and 46F or 2C and 8C. Vials containing Lantus should not be kept in a freezer. If the vial has been frozen, it should be discarded. Opened vials can be refrigerated or kept under room temperature. However, opened vials must be used within 28 days following the first usage. Opened vials should be discarded after 28 days even if they contain insulin. Continue reading >>

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

A fellow caregiver asked... My mother has type 2 diabetes and needs help with her insulin injections. After I open a new bottle, how long does insulin last for, how should I store it, and how do I know whether it's gone bad? Expert Answers As a general rule, most bottles of insulin are good for 28 days once they're opened. Of course, how quickly a person goes through a vial is highly individual. Some may go through a bottle in a week or two. Others, on a lower dosage, may not use all the insulin within four weeks. But the drug's stability and potency is only guaranteed for 28 days. Opened insulin pens typically last 14 days, though some last only 10 days. If you're uncertain, check with your mother's pharmacist to find out how long her insulin should last. When either of you opens a new vial or pen, make a note on the calendar -- and note the date when you'll need to throw out any remaining insulin. It's best to store an opened bottle of insulin at room temperature, even though manufacturers often recommend refrigeration for opened containers. It's usually less painful to inject insulin when it's at room temperature than when it's cold. Store unopened insulin vials and pen cartridges in the fridge, though, where they should last until their expiration date. Insulin shouldn't be exposed to extreme temperatures, so don't leave it in the car, next to the stove, in the freezer, or in the bathroom. If the bottle freezes, it must be discarded. Two typical signs that insulin has gone bad: poor performance and unusual appearance. If your mother is following her treatment plan and her glucose levels stay stubbornly, inexplicably high, her insulin may have lost its potency. Insulin that's cloudy when it's supposed to be clear or that contains particles, crystals, or small clumps Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Novolog Flex Pen And Refrigerated

Novolog Flex Pen And Refrigerated

I'm curious as to why you just stuffed this fast-acting insulin in a drawer instead of using it to your doctor's advice. None of my business, I know, but the curiosity still lingers. I was in the hospital for three day for another issue. This is where I was diagnosed with diabetes. While in the hospital I was given three shots per day of Novolog and one shot per day of Lantus. After being discharged or the process of being discharged my doctor said not to take the Novolog. My prescription was already filled and they wanted me to have it at hand if things turned around. Eating right and exercising a month later I was told to quit the Lantus. So today I test myself twice a week one day. Thursday morning and Thursday evening before eating. I am not to take any insulin right now unless I hit 140 two times in a row. That is how it ended up in the drawer. I still consider myself diabetic and am eating and exercising like I am. No sense in trying a second time around. I might not be as lucky the second time. Well, with an A1c that low it looks like you're doin' good. A lot of exercise and a lot of eating different. Total change of habits all together. Yes I fail every now and then like today But tonight after all the family goes home I will head to the club and will hit it again in the morning. I am working out every other day and sometimes twice a day depending on if there is a spinning class or not. Today I put a pair of 36 pants on and they fit. That is down from a 44. I am here to learn, get and give support. I keep reminding myself I don't want to go from the high blood sugar levels to the normal ones again. Not only did I feel terrible during that three week process but my eyes and readjusting was rough. Key is don't let them run again. Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

Tresiba Question - Insulin - Tudiabetes Forum

Tresiba Question - Insulin - Tudiabetes Forum

Refrigerate pens before opening. After opening can be kept at room temp for up to 56 days its very forgiving Can be kept out out of fridge for longer than any other long acting on the market According to the insert, once you begin using it, you are NOT supposed to refrigerate it Does anyone know the reason for this deviation? Whether you personally like to refrigerate your insulin or not, to the best of my awareness this is the only instance of a manufacturer specifically saying dont do it! Anybody got an idea why? Interesting. I havent been refrigerating my Lantus stash (unopened vials that normally sit for about 3 months), instead Ive kept them in a relatively cool place in my house. I could have swore Id read that it wasnt necessary. this is the only instance of a manufacturer specifically saying dont do it! Anybody got an idea why? I was very puzzled by that also! Would love to know why. My best guess is that its to minimize the temperature swings that would occur if someone was taking it in and out of the fridge several times per day this adds a lot of variability to how long its going to take to the insulins n to deteriorate whereas room temperature / 28 days is black and white I suspect its a regulatory labeling requirement instead of the manufacturers idea Sanofi suggests not injecting Lantus cold as it may be more painful. Lantus crystallizes and I suspect that injecting cold insulin affects that process and may lead to more injury. Question for you Tresiba users. When you switched to Tresiba from Lantus or Levemir, what happened to your total daily basal dosage? More? Less? The same? I was taking 20u of Lantus (8u am, 12u pm). Now taking 16u of Tresiba (started off at 20, which had me going into long slow hypos all night). So Im currently at 38u Lantus. Maybe Continue reading >>

Emily Clanton - I Am A Type 1 Diabetic And Use Cvs All The... | Facebook

Emily Clanton - I Am A Type 1 Diabetic And Use Cvs All The... | Facebook

I am a type 1 diabetic and use CVS all the time since I need a lot of medications. Lately I've been having a lot of problems where when I go to pick up a prescription it will be twice as expensive as the last time even though there have been no changes in my insurance. Usually after I say something and someone looks at it they can figure out why the pricing is wrong but it continues to be wrong every single time and I am never told WHY it wasn't coming up at the correct price. Because of these problems I've been having pretty consistently, I was thinking about switching to an online pharmacy. Even though the prices were a little better through express-scripts, I decided to stay with CVS because I figured that the quality of medication was more guaranteed through a brick and mortar store than somewhere online. The main concern I had was the storage since I use insulin, which must be refrigerated. Tonight I went to pick up my prescription for Lantus that I had dropped off the night before. When I gave the pharmacist my name she went to get it off the shelf. Usually they leave the empty prescription bag with my name on it on the shelf with a note that says 'FRIDGE' since Lantus is supposed to stay refrigerated. However, tonight it was on the shelf. I asked why it was not in the refrigerator and was told "oh, this was just filled just now". I was confused since i had dropped off the prescription at least 24 hrs ago. After I payed a nearly $100 co-pay, I discovered that the Lantus was in fact room temperature, meaning it couldn't have 'just been filled'. When I told another pharmacist this(the other one had left) she said "oh, it's ok room temperature for 4 months". First of all, NO WHERE on the Lantus website does it say this. Secondly, I don't wait till I'm absolutely out Continue reading >>

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