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Is Lantus Fast Acting Insulin?

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Insulin A To Z: A Guide On Different Types Of Insulin

Insulin A To Z: A Guide On Different Types Of Insulin

Elizabeth Blair, A.N.P., at Joslin Diabetes Center, helps break down the different types of insulin and how they work for people with diabetes. Types of Insulin for People with Diabetes Rapid-acting: Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Short-acting: Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting: Covers the blood glucose elevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working. This type of insulin is often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and is usually taken twice a day. Long-acting: This type of insulin is often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin. It lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working. It is taken once or twice a day. A Guide on Insulin Types for People with Diabetes Type Brand Name Onset (length of time before insulin reaches bloodstream) Peak (time period when insulin is most effective) Duration (how long insulin works for) Rapid-acting Humalog Novolog Apidra 10 - 30 minutes 30 minutes - 3 hours 3 - 5 hours Short-acting Regular (R) 30 minutes - 1 hour 2 - 5 hours Up to 12 hours Intermediate- acting NPH (N) 1.5 - 4 hours 4 - 12 hours Up to 24 hours Long-acting Lantus Levemir 0.8 - 4 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours To make an appointment with a Joslin diabetes nurse educator, please call (617) 732-2400. Continue reading >>

Is Newly Approved Tresiba The Best Long-acting Insulin?

Is Newly Approved Tresiba The Best Long-acting Insulin?

Comparing long-acting insulins? Newly approved Tresiba may come out ahead. With the exception of NPH insulin (the original long-acting insulin—examples include Humulin N and Novolin N), they are all going to cost you. So, if you are already paying big bucks for your long-acting insulin, here are some things to think about: What does a long-acting or basal insulin do for me? This is your baseline insulin, the insulin that is secreted to control your sugars when you are not eating (in the fasting state). Put another way, basal Insulin is used to suppress liver glucose production and help you maintain normal sugars even when you aren’t eating. What are my options? The old-school and well respected NPH insulin has been around forever and is considered intermediate acting. Levemir and Lantus were then joined this year by Toujeo and now Tresiba as the main players. Toujeo is basically Lantus (which was losing its patent) and may not gain any traction in the market. These insulins are typically administered once daily to provide basal insulin levels. Basaglar was just approved by the FDA and think of Basaglar as the Lantus “generic” or copycat–that will be available soon and let’s hope it’s cheaper than Lantus. What is Tresiba? Tresiba (insulin degludec) is the longest acting insulin available and there don’t appear to be any coming down the pipeline that give this duration of coverage. What makes Tresiba a hero is the long duration of action (>40 hours) with less fluctuation in blood levels of the drug. It’s given once a day. Is Tresiba the best long-acting insulin? This can only be answered on an individual basis and along with your provider. Lantus, Levemir and Tresiba may have some modest advantages over NPH (less symptomatic and nighttime hypoglycemia) i Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects

Lantus Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Names: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is Lantus? Lantus (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Lantus is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of insulin glargine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Important information You should not use Lantus if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis. Never share a Lantus injection pen or cartridge with another person. Sharing injection pens or cartridges can allow disease such as hepatitis or HIV to pass from one person to another. Lantus is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Lantus if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Lantus is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Lantus is safe for you, tell your docto Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Not All Long-acting Insulins Are The Same

Not All Long-acting Insulins Are The Same

Glargine (Lantus) is an insulin analog recently available in the U.S. It is a long-acting insulin but differs from other long-acting insulins (such as NPH, Lente, and ultralente) because it is clear as opposed to cloudy. It also has an acidic pH and should not be mixed with other insulins. Because it is new and patients and physicians do not have a long history of using it, mistakes can occur. A number of our patients have mixed glargine and rapid-acting insulin, in spite of being instructed not to. Additionally, it is no longer possible to distinguish between short- and long-acting insulins by clear or cloudy, respectively. F.R. is a 55-year-old police officer with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes, diagnosed at age 53 years with positive anti-GAD antibodies. As oral agents lost their efficacy, an injection of evening NPH was added to his treatment. Due to his schedule, which involved working 3–4 nights a week, it was impossible to lower his fasting blood glucose levels on a bedtime NPH/daytime oral agents regimen. He was switched to twice-daily NPH and rapid-acting insulin. His HbA1c level remained elevated at 8.8%. When glargine became available he was switched from twice-daily NPH to evening glargine, plus premeal rapid-acting insulin. He was taught carbohydrate counting and was followed closely. His glargine did not seem to control his daytime blood glucose levels, so he was switched to twice-daily injections of glargine. In spite of the new treatment and close follow-up, F.R. seemed to have more erratic blood glucose levels and more unexplained lows and highs than would have been expected on glargine. Therefore, he was put on a continuous glucose sensor to better document his blood glucose levels. His sensor was picked up from his home on a Saturday by one of o Continue reading >>

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Lantus, Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) 300 units/mL (Toujeo Max; 3 mL SoloStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus Start ~1/3 of total daily insulin dose; use remaining 2/3 of daily insulin dose on short-acting, premeal insulin Usual initial dose range: 0.2-0.4 units/kg; optimal glucose lowering effect may take 5 days to fully manifest and the first insulin glargine dose may be insufficient to cover metabolic needs in the first 24 hr of use Titrate insulin glargine per instructions, and adjust coadministered glucose-lowering therapies per standard of care See Dosing Considerations and Administration Long-acting basal insulin indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Start 0.2 units/kg qDay; if necessary, adjust dosage of other antidiabetic drugs when starting insulin glargine to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia See Dosing Considerations and Administration Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring Titrate Toujeo dose no more frequently than every 3-4 days Use with caution in patients with visual impairment who may rely on audible clicks to dial their dose If changing from a treatment regimen with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin to a regimen with insulin glargine, the amount and timing of shorter-acting insulin Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin glargine is an extended, long-acting insulin. It takes about 90 minutes to begin working after injection, and it stops working after about 24 hours. After injection, insulin glargine is released slowly and constantly into the bloodstream. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL of sterile solution contains 100 u Continue reading >>

Compare Lantus Vs. Humalog

Compare Lantus Vs. Humalog

Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. Humalog (insulin lispro) is the most effective medication for lowering your blood sugar. Humalog (insulin lispro) can be used even if you have liver or kidney problems, unlike other anti-diabetic medications. 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review 280 reviews so far Have you used Humalog (insulin lispro)? Leave a review The Humalog (insulin lispro) FDA package insert doesn’t have numbers about how common side effects are. Continue reading >>

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows the start, peak, and end times for various insulins with some explanations and typical uses for each. When Does My Insulin Peak and How Long Does It Last? designed to peak, covers meals and lowers high BGs Humalog , Novolog and Apidra insulins currently give the best coverage for meals and help keep the glucose lower afterward. Their glucose lowering activity starts to work about 20 minutes after they are taken, with a gradual rise in activity over the next 1.75 to 2.25 hours. Their activity gradually falls over the next 3 hours with about 5 to 6 hours of activity being common with these insulins.Although insulin action times are often quoted as 3-5 hours, the actual duration of insulin action is typically 5 hours or more. See our article Duration of Insulin Action for more information on this important topic. In general, "rapid" insulins are still too slow for many common meals where the glucose peaks within an hour and digestion is complete within 2-3 hours. The best kept secret on stopping post meal spiking is to eake the injection or bolus earlier before the meal and to eat slower low glycemic carbs. Regular insulin still carries its original name of "fast insulin" but its slower action often works better for people who take Symlin or for those who have gastroparesis (delayed digestion). It is also a great choice for those who Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And Their Roles

Types Of Insulin And Their Roles

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Mixing Insulin Glargine With Rapid-acting Insulin: A Review Of The Literature

Mixing Insulin Glargine With Rapid-acting Insulin: A Review Of The Literature

Purpose. To review the literature examining the mixing of insulin glargine with rapid-acting insulin (RAI). Methods. A literature search was conducted via PubMed and Medline (from 1948 to August 2012) using the search terms “diabetes,” “insulin glargine,” “short acting insulin,” “rapid acting insulin,” and “mixing.” Literature was limited to English-language articles reporting on human studies. Studies with data describing mixing glargine with any short-acting insulin or RAI were included. Four studies met inclusion criteria. Results. Of the four studies assessing mixing glargine, one was a pharmacokinetic study. The other three assessed clinical outcomes in “real-world” settings. All of these studies were conducted in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Two of the clinical outcomes studies did not report significant differences in A1C levels or preprandial, postprandial, or nocturnal blood glucose levels from mixing glargine and RAI. One of the clinical outcome studies reported improved blood glucose control (A1C and fasting blood glucose) with RAI mixed with glargine compared to RAI mixed with NPH insulin. There were no significant differences in hypoglycemia in any of the clinical outcome trials at any time measured. Conclusion. Initial small clinical trials indicate that there are no significant changes in clinical outcomes (blood glucose levels, A1C levels, and hypoglycemia) when mixing glargine with RAI. Additional studies with larger patient populations and longer trial durations are needed before mixing glargine with RAI can be recommended on a routine basis in clinical practice. Methodology A literature search was conducted via PubMed and Medline (articles published from 1948 to January 2012) using the search terms “diabetes,” Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Tweet Lantus is an analogue insulin produced by Sanofi-Aventis with the medical name insulin glargine. Lantus has been available for pharmaceutical use since the year 2000. Lantus hit the news in June 2009 over concerns that it may lead to the formation of cancer. However, the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) found the evidence suggesting the link to be inconclusive and cleared the drug for further use. What is Lantus? Lantus is an ultralente (long acting) analogue insulin. The medical name for Lantus, insulin glargine, is taken from how the DNA of human insulin is modified to form the analogue. In glargine’s case, glycine and two arginines are part of the genetic recombination that helps to produce the insulin. Who is Lantus prescribed to? Lantus can be prescribed for all types of diabetes. However, it is most commonly prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes. Lantus may be prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes for whom oral hypoglycemic agents have not shown to be sufficiently effective. How do I take Lantus? Lantus is injected, usually once daily at the same time each day. Like all insulins, Lantus should be injected subcutaneously (into the fatty tissue underneath the skin). The specific mode of action of Lantus means that it should never be diluted or mixed with any other insulin before injecting. Benefits of Lantus The mode of action of Lantus allows for a peakless profile. Lantus has become a popularly prescribed insulin as its consistent activity can help to reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Side effects of Lantus Being an insulin, hypoglycemia can be a relatively common side effect of using Lantus, if dosages are too strong. Other side effects include allergic reactions and swelling, itching or pain at the injection site. Lantus and cancer link In June 200 Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

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