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Is Januvia Fast Acting

How Long Does Januvia Stay In Your System?

How Long Does Januvia Stay In Your System?

Question Originally asked by Community Member Pamela D Johnson How Long Does Januvia Stay In Your System? I took my one and only Januvia pill and within a matter of two hours I had severe hives. I went to a Urgent Care where they gave me prednizone and 1 didn’t work and 2 made my sugar skyrocket. I had to go back later that day where I had an IV an insulin shot and, the hives are still coming out. Benadryl helps only briefly. How much longer before the Januvia is out of my system? I’m also allergic to glucophage. Any suggestions so I don’t continue to gain weight? Answer Hi Pamela, Thank you for your question. Januvia has a half life of 12.4 hours, and so after 87 hours (about 3 and 1/2 days) greater than 99% of the drug will be out of your system. There are several other classes of medication available for the treatment of diabetes. There is a class known as sulfonylureas (glipizide, glyburide, and glimepiride) that is usually used when metformin doesn’t work or can’t be used. There are also alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose and miglitol), thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone and pioglitazone), various forms of insulin, and some miscellaneous agents (exenatide, pramlintide). I hope you can find one that works for you. Best of luck, Casey You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Casey McNulty Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Best-selling Diabetes Drugs Of 2013

The Top 10 Best-selling Diabetes Drugs Of 2013

Everybody knows that diabetes is an epidemic in this country that is costing lives and money. New stats from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) peg at 29.1 million the number of people in the U.S. who have either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, with roughly 9 million of those undiagnosed. Most have Type 2 diabetes, which is more prevalent among minorities. On the other hand, a study found that non-Hispanic white children are diagnosed more often with Type 1 diabetes than other groups. And that is just in the U.S. The rest of the world also is developing diabetes at what many see as alarming rates. Pharma, seeing opportunity, has responded. There are pills as well as injected drugs. Many are incretin mimetics. There are now 12 classes of drugs, including the GLP-1 class drugs like AstraZeneca's ($AZN) Byetta and Novo Nordisk's ($NVO) blockbuster Victoza, and DPP-4 inhibitors like Merck's ($MRK) Januvia, Eli Lilly ($LLY) and Boehringer Ingelheim's Tradjenta/Trajenta and AstraZeneca's Onglyza. These widely used drugs, some of which are on this list, have stirred safety concerns. The FDA and European regulators announced in February that a new round of safety reviews found little evidence that they cause pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer, as some have suggested. But criticism persists, and this month consumer advocacy group Public Citizen again asked the FDA to pull Victoza from the market, saying the FDA's review of adverse reports was not as extensive as its own. What is perhaps becoming a bigger deal for Big Pharma, however, is that with so many treatment options, and more coming, the market has gotten crowded and doctors and patients a bit confused. That has led to some studies to sort out which drugs work the best, and that in turn has led some resear Continue reading >>

Januvia And Pancreatitis: What You Should Know

Januvia And Pancreatitis: What You Should Know

What is Januvia? Januvia is an oral diabetes drug that is used to treat people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas cannot make enough insulin or the body becomes resistant to it. Insulin is the hormone which helps glucose enter the muscle cells to be used for energy. Without this hormone, glucose will stay in the bloodstream, leading to high blood sugar levels. If untreated, high blood sugar levels can lead to long-term problems such as blindness, kidney damage, or loss of limbs. Patients with type 2 diabetes can take Januvia together with a proper exercise and diet program to help them control their blood sugar levels. Januvia, which is also known as Sitagliptin, works by increasing the levels of Insulin, which enhances the postprandial GLP-1 response. Sitagliptin also decreases the amount of glucose produced by your liver. This helps to reduce high blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. The drug should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes. How to take this medication Make sure you carefully follow the instructions on your prescription label. Do not increase or decrease your dosage without permission from your doctor. Take Januvia at the same time every day, so that you can remember your dosage. The drug can be taken with food or without. You should not take it if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Januvia and pancreatitis Patients who take Januvia to treat type 2 diabetes may have an increased risk of developing a medical condition known as pancreatitis; however, some researchers don’t believe there is a strong connection. Even without medication, people with diabetes are twice as likely to develop pancreatitis. It is always important to discuss possible risks with your doctor prior to starting Continue reading >>

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Selected Risk Information About JANUMET and JANUMET XR Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinkin Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Januvia? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Januvia? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. When I was first diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes years ago, I asked my doctor about Januvia. He was not a fan and said he did not feel that it worked. He gave me a sample bottle and I tried it. I did not see any difference at all. That doctor has since retired. I went to my current PCP last week. my A1C was high so my doctor added Januvia to my medicines (Lantus and Humalog). I told him at that time last week that I had tried Januvia before with no results. He wanted me to try it again. The doctors office submitted the RX to Optum RX and I received the medicine yesterday. I took one pill yesterday as directed. I went to bed last night with blood sugar sugar of 73. This morning I woke up with a blood sugar reading of 175. This has been my problem prior to taking Januvia. The other problem is that I am billed $140 for a 3 month RX of Januvia that I am now on the hook for. If it does not work, I am still having to pay for this prescription that does not work, I can't afford to do that. I have called the doctors office and am waiting om a return call. My question is, does Januvia work? I have only taken one pill but read on the internet that Januvia works immediately. What are your experiences with Januvia? Is there anything I can do since I do not believe it works? Is there a way to try other medicines that may work better without paying $140 to try? My doctor has never given me samples of any medicine. I do not know if he has samples. Any insight you could provide would be greatly appreciated. I tried Januvia years ago, was on it for a couple or three years at the highest dose at $100.00 per month. As I really got to looking at all the side effects and le Continue reading >>

Januvia-how Long Before It Takes Effect?

Januvia-how Long Before It Takes Effect?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was just diagnosed last week and the doctor prescribed 100MG of Januvia(1 daily) and 2.5 MG of Glyburide(2 times a day). My A1C was 10.3 with a glucose reading of 327 in the labwork. I have been testing for the past 3 days now and was just wondering how fast these medications begin working. My readings have been considerably lower, however I have changed my diet to cut back on the carbs. Is it possible that the meds start working within several days after starting with them? Is it the change in diet more so this soon? This forum has been a wealth of information and look forward to being a part of it. Hi Jon, welcome! Glad you found the forums. This place has been a wealth of information and support for me. I know you'll love it as well. From what i've read about Januvia, it is supposed to work only when needed, ie: after meals. My father in law has recently had it added to his metformin, has been taking it for a month now and has noted that his post-meal blood sugars have improved, though his fastings are still higher than recommended. Glyburide is a sulfonylurea and works by stimulating the beta cells....my co-worker takes it and it lowers her blood sugar rapidly...in a matter of hours. I think you have to also credit your lifestyle modifications with your lowered blood sugars...GOOD FOR YOU! I hope you're testing often, esp. 2 hrs after the start of your meals...this way you'll learn how differnt foods affect your levels and know what you need to avoid and what you can have without problems. Keep us posted on how the Januvia is working for you. you get a lot of good info here. It is a lea Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

JANUVIA® (sitagliptin) Tablets DESCRIPTION JANUVIA Tablets contain sitagliptin phosphate, an orally-active inhibitor of the dipeptidyl peptidase4 (DPP-4) enzyme. Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate is described chemically as 7-[(3R)-3-amino-1-oxo-4-(2,4,5trifluorophenyl)butyl]-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyrazine phosphate (1:1) monohydrate. The empirical formula is C16H15F6N5O•H3PO4•H2O and the molecular weight is 523.32. The structural formula is: Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate is a white to off-white, crystalline, non-hygroscopic powder. It is soluble in water and N,N-dimethyl formamide; slightly soluble in methanol; very slightly soluble in ethanol, acetone, and acetonitrile; and insoluble in isopropanol and isopropyl acetate. Each film-coated tablet of JANUVIA contains 32.13, 64.25, or 128.5 mg of sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate, which is equivalent to 25, 50, or 100 mg, respectively, of free base and the following inactive ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose, anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, and sodium stearyl fumarate. In addition, the film coating contains the following inactive ingredients: polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, talc, titanium dioxide, red iron oxide, and yellow iron oxide. For Consumers What are the possible side effects of sitagliptin (Januvia)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking sitagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate; or urinating less than usual Continue reading >>

Januvia - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses

Januvia - Fda Prescribing Information, Side Effects And Uses

Januvia is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [See Clinical Studies (14) .] Januvia should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, as it would not be effective in these settings. Januvia has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using Januvia. [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1) .] The recommended dose of Januvia is 100mg once daily. Januvia can be taken with or without food. Recommendations for Use in Renal Impairment For patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] greater than or equal to 45 mL/min/1.73 m2 to less than 90 mL/min/1.73 m2, no dosage adjustment for Januvia is required. For patients with moderate renal impairment (eGFR greater than or equal to 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 to less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m2), the dose of Januvia is 50 mg once daily. For patients with severe renal impairment (eGFR less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m2) or with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, the dose of Januvia is 25 mg once daily. Januvia may be administered without regard to the timing of dialysis. Because there is a need for dosage adjustment based upon renal function, assessment of renal function is recommended prior to initiation of Januvia and periodically thereafter. There have been postmarketing reports of worsening renal function in patients with renal impairment, some of whom were prescribed inappropriate doses of sitagliptin. 100mg tablets are beige, round, film-coated tablets with "277" on one side. 50mg tablets are light beige, round, film-coated t Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Long Acting Insulin Versus Sitagliptin (januvia) In Type 2 Diabetes Not Controlled With Metformin (glucophage) Alone

Long Acting Insulin Versus Sitagliptin (januvia) In Type 2 Diabetes Not Controlled With Metformin (glucophage) Alone

This study compared the safety and efficacy of Insulin glargine (Lantus) versus Sitagliptin (Januvia) in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) poorly controlled by Metformin (Glucophage) alone. Main findings: insulin glargine provides better glycemic control than Sitagliptin when added to Metformin therapy. Metformin is the drug of choice for T2DM. Other drugs are added if Metformin is not enough to control blood sugar. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin given once a day. Sitagliptin belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptydil peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. They work by blocking the release of glucagon (the hormone that raises blood sugar, thereby contradicts the action of insulin) and increasing insulin release by the pancreas. Diabetes control is usually assessed according to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. This reflects the average blood glucose levels over a period of the last 3 months. The present study involved 515 patients assigned to two groups. One group (250 patients) received Insulin glargine while the other (265 patients) received Sitagliptin. Patients were between 35 and 70 years old and received this treatment in addition to Metformin for 24 weeks. The mean reduction in HbA1c was compared at the end of the study. Insulin glargine lowered HbA1c by 1.72%, while sitagliptin only by 1.13%. The difference was significant and suggested a better efficacy of Insulin glargine. A small increase in body weight was found with Insulin glargine use (+0.4 kg), while a decrease was demonstrated with Sitagliptin (-1.1 kg). Symptomatic hypoglycemia (drop in blood sugar levels) was more frequent in the Insulin glargine group. These results suggest that glycemic control is better with Insulin glargine compared to Sitagliptin when either is added to M Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia

What Is Januvia

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

How Januvia Works

How Januvia Works

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. Original Post: This blog has been getting heavy traffic from people searching for information about Januvia, and I'm also getting a lot of mail on the topic. Much of it shows that doctors do not understand the way that this new incretin drug works to lower blood sugar and are therefore prescribing it inappropriately. As a result, a lot of people who are taking Januvia report seeing very high blood sugars. Let's look at why this might be and what it tells them about their true medication needs. The main way that Januvia lowers blood sugar is by raising the level of a substance, GLP-1, which is produced in the gut and has the ability to do several things. 1. GLP-1 stimulates the beta cell to secrete insulin in a manner very similar to that of the sulfonylurea drugs like Amaryl and Glipizide (sulfs). What is different about using Januvia to do this, is that GLP-1 only causes your beta cells to secrete insulin when blood sugar rises to a certain level (for me, it was 120 mg/dl). Thus with GLP-1 stimulation you don't have the problem you have with sulf drugs of insulin being produced all the time, even when there is no glucose coming into the blood stream, and so Januvia does not cause hypos as sulf drugs do. 2. GLP-1 also affects the speed of stomach emptying. This is why larger doses of artificial GLP-1, Byetta, causes vomiting and very slow stomach emptying. The levels of GLP-1 Januvia causes are much lower than those you get with Byetta, so the digestive symptoms are milder, but they are most defi Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

What is Januvia? Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Januvia is for treating people with type 2 diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use Januvia if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Before taking this medicine You should not use Januvia if you are allergic to sitagliptin, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). To make sure Januvia is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); heart problems; pancreatitis; high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood); gallstones; or a history of alcoholism. Januvia is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Your name may need to be listed on a Januvia pregnancy registry when you start using this medicine. It is not known whether sitagliptin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Januvia is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. How should I take Januvia? Take Januvia exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. You may take Januvia with or without food. Follow your doctor's instructions. Your blood sugar will need to be checked often, and you may need othe Continue reading >>

How Does Januvia Work In Your Body?

How Does Januvia Work In Your Body?

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away. Kidney problems, somet Continue reading >>

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