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Is It Okay For Diabetics To Eat Butter?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Despite the fact that health professionals for years have recommended reducing its intake, butter intake is still quite high, at 23 sticks per American per year. Its creamy delicious goodness just has not gone away. But is butter making a comeback in the nutrition science world? Is it really not as bad as we once thought? Although it was vilified in the 1980’s and 1990’s, has it been pardoned from its unhealthy label? History Butter has always been a staple in the American diet. In the 1920’s, Americans consumed approximately 72 sticks (18 pounds) of butter per year. The Great Depression hit and then World War II, with these events causing a steep decline in butter consumption with a concurrent rise in margarine use. Butter continued to decrease in the American diet throughout the 1950’s – 1980’s. At that point, the role of butter stayed fairly steady at around 20 sticks (5 pounds) per year. Rising intake just recently started in the 2010’s decade. Nutritional Content Butter is 100% fat, meaning all of the calories that butter provides are in the form of fat. One tablespoon of butter contains 102 calories, all from the 11 grams of total fat. Looking at the fat content more closely, that tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat and 3 grams of monounsaturated fat, as well as approximately 31 mg of cholesterol. Is Butter Recommended for Diabetics? For years, saturated fats in butter and other foods were discouraged because of the strong association with cardiovascular diseases. Eating a diet high in saturated fat raises blood lipids, increasing the likelihood that arteries will be occluded by the lipids and eventually lead to serious complications such as heart attack and stroke. This is a known scientifically proven fact. The American Heart Ass Continue reading >>

What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you’re probably wondering what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels in check. The good news is you don’t have to give up your favorite foods. A diabetes diet, like most healthy diets, is all about controlling portions and consuming a wide array of vegetables, fresh fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds, lean protein, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats. Watch Your Carb Intake When managing type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand that not all foods are created equal: Some will affect your blood sugar levels more than others. Carbohydrates, in particular, break down into glucose quickly, which spikes your blood sugar levels. Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables. “In general, carbohydrates should be limited to approximately 30 to 60 grams (g) per meal to prevent high blood glucose levels,” says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Franklin, New Jersey. Once you’ve learned to manage your carb portions, try balancing your meals with lean protein and healthy fats, which digest slowly and keep your blood sugar steady after meals. Use the Healthy Plate Method So what does a healthy diabetes diet look like? It’s simple, says Palinski-Wade. Just use the healthy plate method: Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables (like spinach, carrots, and other greens), a quarter of your plate with lean protein (such as grilled chicken, fish, lean beef, or pork), and a quarter of your plate with starchy foods (like whole grain bread, brown rice, or whole wheat pasta). Below is a sample meal plan to get you started. Breakfast Ideal Meal: ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese + 1 tbsp chopped walnuts + 1 cup fresh fruit salad Why it Continue reading >>

Butter Or Margarine?

Butter Or Margarine?

Butter versus margarine. Given the amount of passion and controversy this topic raises, you’d think we were talking about the presidential race. Undoubtedly, you have an opinion based on what you use. But what’s the real deal behind the debate? Butter, defined I don’t think you’d get much of an argument about the taste of butter. There’s nothing quite like melted butter on an ear of corn, a bowl of popcorn, or a slice of straight-out-of-the-oven bread. But we know that taste doesn’t necessary equate with health. Butter is a dairy product that’s made by churning cream or milk to separate the solids (fat and protein) from the liquid (buttermilk). By regulation, butter must be at least 80% fat, about 16% water, and 3% milk solids. Most of the butter we eat is made from cow’s milk, but butter can be made from sheep’s, goat’s, buffalo’s, or other mammal’s milk, as well. There are different types of butter, including: • sweet cream butter: made from pasteurized fresh cream • raw butter: unpasteurized • whipped butter: contains added air, making it lower in fat than regular butter • light butter: contains added air and water; has about half the fat as regular butter • grass-fed butter: made from the milk of cows who are fed grass, not grain • cultured butter: contains healthy bacteria (probiotics) • ghee: clarified butter Coloring and salt may be added to butter. Unsalted butter is available, too. Margarine, defined Margarine is used as a substitute for butter, and it’s made from a variety of vegetable oils, such as soy, canola, and palm oil. Other oils may be used, too, including flaxseed and fish oils. By regulation, margarine must contain at least 80% fat. Margarines that are lower in fat must be called “soft margarine spreads.” I Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Rich in unsaturated fat and protein, all-natural peanut butter can make a nutritious addition to meals and snacks for individuals with diabetes. Peanut butter's low carbohydrate content keeps blood sugar under control, while its healthy fats satisfy the appetite for several hours. While people with diabetes should limit their portion size to avoid weight gain, peanut butter can still be a healthy addition to a diabetic diet. In its natural form with no added fats, sweeteners or sugars, peanut butter is considered a nutritional powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Because there is no cholesterol and very little saturated fat in peanut butter, it is also appropriate for people with cardiac problems. The carbohydrate content of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving. Because of its low carbohydrate and high healthy fat and protein content, peanut butter does not elevate blood sugar. Serving Size for Those With Diabetes According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with diabetes should consume no more than 2 tablespoons of peanut butter at one snack or meal. Even though peanut butter does pack a healthy nutritional punch, it is also high in calories, and 2 tablespoons equals roughly 200 hundred calories, or 10% of the daily caloric needs for a 2,000-calorie diet. Individuals who are diabetic and who want to lose weight may consider reducing their portion size of peanut butter to 1 tablespoon at a time, simply to cut the calories but still reap some of the nutritional benefits. Healthy Snack Ideas Diabetic snacks should ideally contain carbohydrate, fat and protein, and peanut butter meets the fat and protein requirement. To mee Continue reading >>

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?

The world of nutrition is often confusing, even for dietitians and other nutrition experts. Debates (and bickering) rage on about which diet is best for weight loss, how much carbohydrate a person with diabetes should have, and what kind of fat is best to eat. It’s not so easy these days to choose a spread for your morning toast or your baked potato. Years ago, folks had pretty much two choices: butter and margarine. Today, we have butter, light butter, whipped butter, stick margarine, vegetable oil spread, margarine with phytosterols, margarine with yogurt, and vegan margarine (just to name a few). How do you possibly choose? First things first Most people know that butter and margarine are not the same. There are distinct differences between the two, even though they’re often used for the same purpose. Butter • Made from churned cream (so it’s an animal product) • Contains cholesterol and saturated fat (1 tablespoon has roughly 30 milligrams of cholesterol and 7 grams of saturated fat) • Does not contain trans fats (an unhealthy type of fat formed when oils are partially hydrogenated) • Contains vitamins A, D, E, and K • Good choice for baking • Healthier options are whipped butter or butter blended with canola or olive oil • “European-style” or “rich” butter contains even more fat and saturated fat than regular butter Margarine • Made by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil • Some brands contain trans fat (1 tablespoon of stick margarine contains 3 grams of trans fat) • Contains less saturated fat than butter (1 tablespoon has approximately 2–3 grams of saturated fat) and no cholesterol • Tub and liquid margarines are healthier than stick margarines • Some brands are fortified with plant stanols or sterols Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

While there's no substitute for a balanced healthy diet, adding certain foods may help those with diabetes keep sugar levels under control. Coffee and cinnamon have made headlines as foods that might be able to help cut the risk of diabetes or help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. However, don't get the idea that such foods are magic pills for your diabetic diet. It's still important for people with diabetes to eat a balanced healthy diet and exercise to help manage the condition. Nevertheless, some foods, such as white bread, are converted almost immediately to blood sugar, causing a quick spike. Other foods, such as brown rice, are digested more slowly, causing a lower and gentler change in blood sugar. If you are trying to follow a healthy diet for diabetes, here are 6 suggestions that may help to keep your blood sugar in check. Porridge Porridge can help control blood sugar and the charity Diabetes UK recommends it to see you through the morning. Even though porridge is a carbohydrate, it's a very good carbohydrate. Because it's high in soluble fibre, it's slower to digest and it won't raise your blood sugar as much or as quickly. It's going to work better at maintaining a healthy blood sugar level over time. Not only does this high-quality carbohydrate offer a steadier source of energy than white bread, it can also help with weight loss. The soluble fibre in oats helps to keep us feeling fuller longer. That's important for people with type 2 diabetes, who tend to be overweight. If you reduce the weight, you usually significantly improve the glucose control. Barley isn't as popular as oats, but there's some evidence that barley, which is also high in soluble fibre, may also help with blood glucose control. Besides oats and barley, most whole grains are going to Continue reading >>

Butter A Day Keeps Diabetes Away 7

Butter A Day Keeps Diabetes Away 7

Most of us have heard the old saying, “An apple a day, keeps the doctor away”. Not for me, butter a day keeps the doctor and diabetes away. Butter, real butter is truly diabetes friendly. Fruits and vegetables will not keep the doctor away High fat, real foods have kept my doctor away If you eat high carb, glutenous, processed foods… an apple a day is NOT going to save you. To rephrase that, if you eat the product offerings by Big Food, fruits and vegetables are not going to save you. I know, I ate fruits often. A bowl of fruit was a mainstay on our counter both while growing up and in my adult years. A butter a day keeps diabetes away and has helped erase my need for doctors. I have not been to the doctor for diabetes or any sickness reason since 2009. Most days my breakfast is a little butter and/or coconut oil in my coffee, or I will just have black coffee. Fruits Before Diabetes With 100% certainty I can tell you eating a lot of fruit will not keep the doctor away. I ate a lot of fruit and vegetables growing up and into my adult years. Yes, I ate a lot of processed ‘junk’ but much of that was deemed ‘healthy’ by the so-called nutritional experts. Items like Nutrigrain Bars, sugary fruit juices, cereals, whole grain breads, etc. Bottom Line: Consuming a lot of fruits, fruit juices and vegetables did not prevent me from seeing the doctor regularly throughout my youth and into my adult years, leading ultimately to a diabetes diagnosis. Low Carb Paleo I received a diabetes diagnosis and was placed on a diabetes drug, a cholesterol drug, a hypertension drug and insulin. Immediately I began to crank down the carbohydrates and increasing the fats. Funny thing happened. The more fat I consumed and the less carbs I consumed… I needed less and less drugs and i Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

Cheese Or Butter – What Is Better For Diabetics? (disease Query Of The Day)

Cheese Or Butter – What Is Better For Diabetics? (disease Query Of The Day)

A healthy diet is vital to manage diabetes. You do not have to eat special foods. You can eat what your family eats, including occasional sweets. Limit your intake of saturated fats. Butter is made up almost entirely of milk fat. Cheese contains both fat and casein of milk. In general, butter has more calories than cheese. But it also depends on what type of cheese and butter you are consuming. Now-a-days, low calorie cheese and butter are available in the market. You have to watch out how much and how often you eat. A new research suggests that cheese could actually ward off diabetes. But it is advisable not to eat more cheese until the results are confirmed in other studies. Here are some diet alterations you could make in order to keep your diabetes in check: Green leafy veggies: Vegetables like spinach, kale, and collard greens are healthy for a number of reasons. They’re low in calories but rich in nutrients like vitamin C, beta carotene, and magnesium that may help prevent diabetes. One study found that increasing your intake of leafy green vegetables to about one and a half servings (a serving is 106 g) a day lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes by 14%. Pulses: Whether you prefer white beans, soybeans, or lentils, these fiber-rich foods can help stabilize blood sugar. With nearly as much protein as meat, beans are also low in saturated fat, the bad fat that can be harmful to your heart. Try replacing a serving of white rice with a serving of beans. One study found that making this simple switch could significantly lower your risk of metabolic syndrome, a name for a group of risk factors, including extra weight around your belly that increases the risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Fish: This fish is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, a type Continue reading >>

The Case For Eating Butter Just Got Stronger

The Case For Eating Butter Just Got Stronger

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. It looks like butter may, in fact, be back. The creamy condiment is a “middle-of-the-road” food, nutritionally speaking—better than sugar, worse than olive oil—according to a new report, which adds to a growing body of research showing that the low-fat-diet trend was misguided. The new study analyzed nine papers that included more than 600,000 people and concluded that consuming butter is not linked to a higher risk for heart disease and might be slightly protective against type 2 diabetes. This goes against the longstanding advice to avoid butter because it contains saturated fat. To be clear, the new study doesn’t say butter is a health food, rather that “it doesn’t seem to be hugely harmful or beneficial,” says study author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts in Boston. This is in line with the new thinking from a growing number of nutrition scientists who say that cutting back on fat, even the saturated kind, is doing more harm than good. “In my mind, saturated fat is kind of neutral overall,” Mozaffarian says. “Vegetable oils and fruits and nuts are healthier than butter, but on the other hand, low-fat turkey meat or a bagel or cornflakes or soda is worse for you than butter.” TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now In the study, published Tuesday in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers looked at people’s butter consumption and their risk for chronic disease and found no link to heart disease. In four of the nine studies, people who ate butter daily had a 4% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. More research is needed to understand why, but it may be Continue reading >>

I Am A Diabetic Patient Should I Eat Butter Or Not?

I Am A Diabetic Patient Should I Eat Butter Or Not?

Answered Apr 13, 2017 Author has 472 answers and 289.9k answer views You should! Butter, ghee and olive oil are among the high quality fats that are actually good for diabetics. Although the amount has to be limited and not exceeded. In fact, anything that is exceeded does more harm than good, however beneficial it might be. Anyway, an LCF (Low carbs High fat) diet seems to help diabetics more. Check out this excellent article that shows a new food pyramid for diabetics . Answered Feb 12, 2017 Author has 3.5k answers and 2m answer views What kind of question is this? OP in denial mode? A diabetic should adapt to a diet that avoids sugar spikes or spike in blood sugar and insulin. A diet that should release glucose slowly; a diet that is high in fibre, fat and protein; a diet that is void of refined carbohydrates. Edit:. Question was edited. And so is the answer. Butter is a very healthy choice for diabetics as it does not cause sugar spike. I am a pre diabetic at 50+. We now buy butter and ghee in kilogram size or 1/2 Kg instead of 100gm size. Butter is good. But buttered toast or cookie is bad. People with diabetes do not have to worry about eating fat because it doesn't have much of an effect on blood glucose . Fat, found in margarine, oils and salad dressings, has little immediate effect on blood glucose levels. However, eating a fatty meal can slow down digestion and make it harder for your insulin to work, causing a possible high blood glucose level hours after your meal. Some fats can raise blood cholesterol, increasing your risk for heart attack or stroke. These fats are called saturated fat and trans fat and should be limited as much as possible. Sources of saturated fat include: butter, shortening , red meat, cheese and whole milk. Trans fat is found in some m Continue reading >>

Diabetics And Butter

Diabetics And Butter

If you have diabetes, following a healthy diet is one of the most important steps you can take to control blood sugar levels. A healthy diet also lowers your risk for cardiovascular disease, which is higher when you have diabetes. Butter is a source of unhealthy fats, which can contribute to heart disease, so it should not be a regular component of your healthy diet for diabetes management. Video of the Day Obesity is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, and the majority of individuals with the condition are overweight or obese. If you are overweight and have high blood sugar levels, losing weight can help you control your blood sugar levels. With 102 calories per tablespoon, butter can contribute to weight gain or interfere with efforts to lose weight. As a healthier option, take smaller portions of butter or switch to a small amount of an unsaturated fat option, such as olive oil. Avoid Butter for a Healthier Heart Diabetes increases your risk for heart disease, and a healthy diet supports heart health as well as a healthy weight and lower blood sugar levels. Butter is a poor dietary choice because each tablespoon contains 7.3 grams of saturated fat, or nearly 37 percent of the daily value -- a total of 20 grams of saturated fat daily -- based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Saturated fat can raise your cholesterol levels and increase your risk for heart disease, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Plant-based oils are lower in saturated fat, making them healthier choices than butter. Your blood sugar levels rise after you eat foods with carbohydrates, and individuals with diabetes must carefully monitor the quantity of carbohydrates they consume and the timing. High-glycemic carbohydrates can spike your blood sugar levels, while a low-glycemic d Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

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