diabetestalk.net

Is It Ok To Take Metformin For Prediabetes?

Prediabetes: Which Treatment Should I Use To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Prediabetes: Which Treatment Should I Use To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Prediabetes: Which Treatment Should I Use to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Prediabetes: Which Treatment Should I Use to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them. Prediabetes: Which Treatment Should I Use to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Make major lifestyle changes to help prevent type 2 diabetes. Take the medicine metformin (Glucophage) to help prevent type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, your blood sugar is higher than it should be. You are more likely to get type 2 diabetes . Major lifestyle changes can help prevent type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes. These changes include losing weight, eating healthier foods, and getting more exercise. The medicine metformin can also help prevent type 2 diabetes in people with prediabetes. Even if you take metformin, it is important to make as many healthy lifestyle changes as you can. Doing both of these things may give you the best chance of delaying or preventing type 2 diabetes over the long term. Type 2 diabetes can have a big impact on your life. If you get it, you'll probably have to make some changes. For example, you may have to carefully watch what you eat, take medicine every day, and watch for other health problems. Over time, diabetes can harm your eyes, nerves, and kidneys.It can damage your blood vessels. This can lead to heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.You could also have nerve damage. In your feet, this nerve damage can cause slow healing and pain when you walk.Your immune system may become weak and less able to fight infections. The main way to prevent type 2 diabetes is to lower blood sugar Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

This Issue The oral biguanide metformin (Glucophage, and others) is generally the drug of choice for initial treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has also been used to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes in patients considered to be at high risk for the disease. Recent guidelines recommend considering use of metformin in patients with prediabetes (fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dL, 2-hr post-load glucose 140-199 mg/dL, or A1C 5.7-6.4%), especially in those who are <60 years old, have a BMI >35 kg/m2, or have a history of gestational diabetes.1 Metformin has not been approved for such use by the FDA. Continue reading >>

Could I Get Opinions Regarding Metformin & Pre-diabetes?

Could I Get Opinions Regarding Metformin & Pre-diabetes?

Could I get opinions regarding Metformin & pre-diabetes? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Could I get opinions regarding Metformin & pre-diabetes? I just came across this site while viewing information but I was hoping just to get some personal opinions others may have here based on their experiences, etc. I was just diagnosed with pre-diabetes with a 5.7. I don't have insurance so I unfortunately pay out of pocket each time I see a doctor. I just thought it was time to schedule a check up & the doctor ended up giving me my results. Here's the thing I was curious about, my doctor immediately said that he wanted to put me on Metformin 500 mg. However he wanted me to take it 3 times a day, Morning, dinner, before bed to equal 1500. I was a bit taken back at first that I would be going that high & when I asked if I was progressed that far to immediately require 1500, he said the higher the dosage right away for pre-diabetes the better chance of returning to "normal" quicker. I already picked up the Metformin but my pharmacists themselves said they were shocked he put me on such a high dosage at once. The pharmacists actually called my doctor who then called me & told me that after 1 month, we'd check my A1C again & that depending on my results- we could go down to possible 1000 or 500 mg a day. He then insisted it was better to go on a high dosage of Metformin right away in conjunction of me changing my lifestyle. Has anyone ever gone on a high dosage right away? I guess I'm just a bit nervous because every diabetic I've known has automatically been put on 500 mg a day, I'm starting on 1500. I was just curious if anyone els Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

Prediabetes is, for many people, a confusing condition. It’s not quite Type 2 diabetes — but it’s not quite nothing, either. So how concerned should you be about it? For years, the jargon-filled names given to this condition — impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) — may have made the task of taking it seriously more difficult. But in 2002, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), along with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, inaugurated the term “prediabetes” to convey the likely result of not making diet or lifestyle changes in response to this diagnosis. In 2003, the threshold for prediabetes was lowered from a fasting glucose level of 110 mg/dl to one of 100 mg/dl. Then, in 2008, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) began recommending the drug metformin for some cases of prediabetes — specifically, for people under age 60 with a very high risk of developing diabetes, for people who are very obese (with a body-mass index, or BMI, of 35 or higher), and for women with a history of gestational diabetes. The ADA also said that health-care professionals could consider metformin for anyone with prediabetes or an HbA1c level (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) between 5.7% and 6.4%. But according to a recent study, metformin is still rarely prescribed for prediabetes. The study, published in April in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found that only 3.7% of people with prediabetes were prescribed metformin over a three-year period, based on data from a large national sample of adults ages 19 to 58. According to a Medscape article on the study, 7.8% of people with prediabetes with a BMI of 35 or higher or a history of gestational diabetes were prescribed metformin — still a very low rate for t Continue reading >>

Prediabetes - Medications

Prediabetes - Medications

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Metformin Or Lifestyle Modification In The Treatment Of Pre-diabetes

Metformin Or Lifestyle Modification In The Treatment Of Pre-diabetes

Metformin or lifestyle modification in the treatment of pre-diabetes Improving diabetes prevention with benefit based tailored treatment: risk based reanalysis of Diabetes Prevention Program BMJ 2015; 350 doi: (Published 19 February 2015) Cite this as: BMJ 2015;350:h454 Metformin or lifestyle modification in the treatment of pre-diabetes The present article (1) has provided leads to the effectiveness of lifestyle modifications in reducing the incidence of diabetes from a pre-diabetes state in the general population. The common concept of initiating metformin for the treatment of pre-diabetic state, as the only effective measure seems to be limited with the findings of this study. Though metformin treatment reduced the incidence by 21.5% in absolute terms, the benefit was maximal in the quarter with the highest risk of developing diabetes. The effect of lifestyle modification, on the other hand showed six fold reduction in absolute risk (28.3%) in the highest risk quarter, which is higher than metformin group. A meta-analysis study (2) done on three randomized clinical trials showed that metformin decreases the rate of conversion from prediabetes to diabetes. The effective dose was 850 mg twice daily and lower dosage 250 mg twice or 3 times daily was not very effective. The studies were done in people of varied ethnicity. The number needed to treat was between 7 and 14 for treatment over a 3-year period. The study showed variations in the in overall rates of progression to diabetes in these 3 groups. The study from China(3)had an overall rate of conversion to diabetes of 10%; while that from India (4) showed a conversion rate of 48%. In the study(5) with mixed ethnicity (55% white, 20% African American, and only 5% Asian), a rate of conversion to diabetes was 24%. The a Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

The oral biguanide metformin (Glucophage, and others) is generally the drug of choice for initial treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has also been used to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes in patients considered to be at high risk for the disease. Recent guidelines recommend considering use of metformin in patients with prediabetes (fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dL, 2-hr post-load glucose 140-199 mg/dL, or A1C 5.7-6.4%), especially in those who are <60 years old, have a BMI >35 kg/m2, or have a history of gestational diabetes.1 Metformin has not been approved for such use by the FDA. CLINICAL STUDIES — In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) trial, 3234 nondiabetic adults with a BMI ≥24 kg/m2 (≥22 kg/m2 in Asian patients) and elevated fasting and post-load plasma glucose concentrations were randomized to receive intensive lifestyle intervention focusing on weight loss and exercise, metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo.2 After a mean follow-up of 2.8 years, the incidence of diabetes was reduced, compared to placebo, by 58% with intensive lifestyle intervention and by 31% with metformin. Metformin was as effective as lifestyle intervention among patients <60 years old or with a BMI ≥35 kg/m2. When the 3-year DPP trial ended, the intensive lifestyle intervention group was offered semi-annual counseling and the metformin group could continue to take the drug. During a follow-up of 15 years, the average annual incidence of diabetes, compared to placebo, was 27% lower in patients originally randomized to lifestyle intervention and 18% lower in those randomized to metformin.3 ADVERSE EFFECTS — No significant safety issues have been detected with long-term use of metformin. The drug can cause adverse gastrointestinal effects such as metallic taste Continue reading >>

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Tweet Glucophage and Metformin are often mentioned in relation to diabetes treatment. But what exactly is Glucophage and how does Glucophage help control type 2 diabetes? The following guide to Glucophage should help you to understand more about this medication, its side effects and its value. What is Glucophage? Glucophage tablets (and Glucophage SR tablets) each have an active ingredient called Metformin hydrochloride. Metformin is widely used to aid in the control of blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. How does Glucophage help people with type 2 diabetes? Amongst people with type 2 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Furthermore, the cells in the body may be resistant to any insulin that is present. Normally, insulin would instruct cells to remove sugar from the blood, but in people with diabetes blood sugar levels can climb too high. As we said before, Glucophage contains the ingredient Metformin. Metformin (Metformin hydrochloride) is a type of medicine known as a biguanide. This works to lower the amount of sugar in the blood of people with diabetes. It does this by lowering the amount of sugar produced in the liver, and also increasing the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. The cells are therefore more able to remove sugar from the blood. Metformin also slows the absorption of sugars from the intestines. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels between and after meals. Who is Glucophage prescribed to? Glucophage is usually prescribed as a treatment for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese. When diet and exercise fail to adequately control blood glucose levels, Glucophage is prescribed. Sometimes, this medicine is used in conjunction with other anti-diabetic medication. How often do people Continue reading >>

Metformin Or Lifestyle Modification In The Treatment Of Pre-diabetes

Metformin Or Lifestyle Modification In The Treatment Of Pre-diabetes

The present article (1) has provided leads to the effectiveness of lifestyle modifications in reducing the incidence of diabetes from a pre-diabetes state in the general population. The common concept of initiating metformin for the treatment of pre-diabetic state, as the only effective measure seems to be limited with the findings of this study. Though metformin treatment reduced the incidence by 21.5% in absolute terms, the benefit was maximal in the quarter with the highest risk of developing diabetes. The effect of lifestyle modification, on the other hand showed six fold reduction in absolute risk (28.3%) in the highest risk quarter, which is higher than metformin group. A meta-analysis study (2) done on three randomized clinical trials showed that metformin decreases the rate of conversion from prediabetes to diabetes. The effective dose was 850 mg twice daily and lower dosage 250 mg twice or 3 times daily was not very effective. The studies were done in people of varied ethnicity. The number needed to treat was between 7 and 14 for treatment over a 3-year period. The study showed variations in the in overall rates of progression to diabetes in these 3 groups. The study from China(3) had an overall rate of conversion to diabetes of 10%; while that from India (4) showed a conversion rate of 48%. In the study (5) with mixed ethnicity (55% white, 20% African American, and only 5% Asian), a rate of conversion to diabetes was 24%. The advantage of lifestyle modification is also stressed by Tulso P (6) which showed that there is 20% decline in the development of diabetes from pre-diabetic state by lifestyle intervention and that too for as long as 10 years. It also showed that 6.9 persons are needed to participate in the lifestyle intervention programme to prevent 1 cas Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that blood glucose screening for adults begin at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight and have additional risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. There are several blood tests for prediabetes. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test This test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. In general: An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal An A1C level between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates type 2 diabetes Certain conditions can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you are pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant). Fasting blood sugar test A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. In general: A fasting blood sugar level below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — 5.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — is considered normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 7.0 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. This result is sometimes called impaired fasting glucose. A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher indicates type 2 diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test This test is usually used to diagnose diabetes only during pregnancy. A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. Then you'll drink a sugary solution, and your blood sugar level will be measured again after two hours. In general: A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmo Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Potential Benefits Of Metformin

5 Surprising Potential Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin, used mainly as a type 2 diabetes treatment is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs. It is inexpensive, very safe, and often the recommended first-line treatment for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Metformin works by helping the body better utilize it’s own insulin and helps stop the liver from releasing glucose into the bloodstream. Aside from helping with blood sugar management, there are other potential benefits from taking metformin: May help prevent or treat cancer. In one study, patients with breast cancer seemed to benefit from taking metformin over those not taking metformin for their diabetes and even over those without diabetes. A seven study analysis found that women taking metformin for 3 years cut their breast cancer risk by 25 percent. In another study, the risk of getting pancreatic cancer was 62 percent lower in those taking metformin than in those not taking metformin. Yet another study indicated that metformin users with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors got a significantly lowered risk of their cancer progression. Promotes good gut bacteria growth. A recent study published in the ADA’s Diabetes Care journal found that metformin does seem to change gut microbiota in a favorable direction. It appears to do this by enabling the growth of mucin-degrading A. muciniphila and several short chain fatty acid-producing microbiota. May help protect from glaucoma. A study published last year in JAMA Ophalmology showed that the use of metformin and not any other diabetes medications was linked to a reduced risk of open-angle glaucoma even after taking into account diabetes management and other variables. The University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center website states that “The study revealed that patients prescribed the highest amount of m Continue reading >>

More Pre-diabetics Should Take Metformin: Study

More Pre-diabetics Should Take Metformin: Study

It’s cheap, safe, and been proven to be an effective way to both treat and prevent Type 2 diabetes over many decades. Yet a new study finds few doctors are prescribing metformin to those with pre-diabetes who are at risk for developing the metabolic disorder. Researchers with the University of California-Los Angeles have determined only 3.7 percent of U.S. adults with pre-diabetes are prescribed metformin. The findings, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, many of the 57 million Americans with pre-diabetes are missing out on significant way to stay healthy. Metformin and lifestyle changes both can prevent the onset of diabetes, but people often struggle to adopt healthier habits, noted lead researcher Tannaz Moin, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and at VA Greater Los Angeles. "Diabetes is prevalent, but pre-diabetes is even more prevalent and we have evidence-based therapies like metformin that are very safe and that work," Dr. Moin said. "Metformin is rarely being used for diabetes prevention among people at risk for developing it. This is something that patients and doctors need to be talking about and thinking about." Pre-diabetes is marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not quite in the diabetes range. The American Diabetes Association in 2008 added metformin to its guidelines for use in diabetes prevention for such individuals who are under age 60, are severely obese, or have a history of gestational diabetes. For the new study, UCLA researchers tracked 17,352 adults aged 19 to 58 with pre-diabetes insured by UnitedHealthcare. They also found: • The prevalence of metformin prescriptions was 7.8 percent for severely obese patients. • Metform Continue reading >>

More in diabetes