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Is It Bad To Smoke When You Have Diabetes?

Diabetes And Smoking

Diabetes And Smoking

Smoking is bad for everyone, and it's especially risky if you have diabetes. The nicotine in cigarettes makes your blood vessels harden and narrow, curbing blood flow around your body. And since diabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease, you definitely don't want the extra risk that comes from smoking. No matter how much or how long you have smoked, quitting helps your health. You'll feel better, look better (since smoking gives you wrinkles before you're old), and you'll save money, too. If you have diabetes, here are some tips to help you quit, based on guidelines from the American Cancer Society. 1. Set a quit date. You don't have to quit immediately. If you know it's more realistic for you to kick the habit after a big event or deadline, make that your quit date. 2. Tell your doctor the date. You'll have built-in support. 3. Make smoking inconvenient. Don't have anything you need to smoke on hand, like ash trays, lighters, or matches. 4. Breathe deeply when you crave a cigarette. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, and then exhale slowly. 5. Spend time in places where you can't smoke because it's banned, such as a library, theater, or museum. 6. Hang out with friends who are also working on kicking the habit. Go to places that don't allow smoking. 7. Reach for low-calorie, good-for-you foods instead of smoking. Choose fresh fruit and crisp, crunchy vegetables. 8. Exercise to ease your stress instead of lighting up. 9. Go decaf. Pass up coffee, soft drinks that have caffeine, and alcohol, as they all can increase the urge to smoke. 10. Keep your hands too busy for cigarettes. Draw, text, type, or knit, for examples. 11. Hack your habits. If you always had a cigarette on your work break, take a walk, talk to a friend, or do something else instead. 12. Wrap a ci Continue reading >>

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes: How Bad Are Cigarettes For T2 Diabetics?

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes: How Bad Are Cigarettes For T2 Diabetics?

Cigarette smoking proves to be one of the deadliest habits mankind has known. The nicotine substance contained in every stick collects in the lungs as you continue smoking. But, that’s just the beginning. Soon your heart suffers and the cells in your body are also destroyed, which can lead to cancer of various types. Nicotine comes from the plant nicotiana tabacum. It is used as a stimulant drug and as an ingredient for making insecticide. Scientists believe that the stimulating properties is a strong factor that causes nicotine dependence. WARNING: Cigarette Smoking is Bad for Diabetics If you have Diabetes, don’t smoke. Or don’t smoke at all even if you are non-Diabetic. We all know that cigarette has always been a health hazard. It will always be in the list of the most dangerous and addictive substances on Earth. Yet, many people seem to ignore the negative repercussions of tobacco use. Currently, approximately 42.1 million US citizens smoke, 20.5% of which are men and 15.8% are women. The American Chemical Society conducted a research on nicotine and Diabetes. It says that nicotine is also responsible for elevated blood sugar level among Diabetics. It is a domino effect. High blood sugar increases the risk for developing cardiovascular and kidney problems. The nerves are also affected. While smoking is not a direct cause of Type 2 Diabetes, it is a risk factor. Scientists have found smoking to cause blood sugar levels to go up. This would give people with type 2 Diabetes a hard time controlling their disease. Smoking-Obesity-Diabetes Obesity serves as the common denominator. Smoking promotes central obesity. Obesity is a risk factor for developing insulin resistance. Further: Smoking elevates the cortisol concentration. Cigarette smoking increases oxidative s Continue reading >>

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: INTRODUCTION Smoking is one of the modifiable risk factors for many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, and diabetes. However, the adverse effects of smoking on diabetes have been generally under recognized. In the guidelines from the Korean Diabetes Association, smoking cessation is recommended as one of the most important steps in preventing the cardiovascular complications of diabetes [1]. Many studies have shown that the adverse effects of smoking on diabetes mellitus are not only diabetic macrovascular complications but the causal nature of its association with diabetes and the progression of diabetic microvascular complications has yet to be explored. Although smoking is known to decrease body weight, it is associated with central obesity [2]. Smoking also increases inflammation and oxidative stress [3], to directly damage β-cell function [4] and to impair endothelial function [5]. The prevalence of smoking in Korean men is near 50%, which is the highest smoking rate in the Western Pacific region. In addition to obesity, the high prevalence of smoking is one of the major health problems for Korea's public health. This review is about the various smoking effects on diabetes mellitus, diabetic complications, and diabetic incidence. Understanding the hazardous effects of smoking on diabetes mellitus may lead to more emphasis on smoking prevention and smoking cessation as important strategies in the management of diabetes mellitus. Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes‏

Smoking And Diabetes‏

Smoking has been proven conclusively to cause a wide range of health problems. Tobacco users are far more likely to succumb to heart disease, lung cancer, emphysema, and stroke than non-smokers. Additional health problems are also commonly caused by smoking, and some existing health problems can also be greatly exacerbated by tobacco use including several types of cancer, eye diseases, lung infections, and allergies, among others. As dangerous as smoking is to people as a whole, it is far more dangerous for those with diabetes, both type one and type two. This is, in part, because both smoking and diabetes can lead to similar health complications. Additionally, tobacco products may make diabetes symptoms worse. One reason smokers who also have diabetes may encounter health issues is because both tobacco products and diabetes deteriorate the body in similar ways. For instance, both can lead to eye diseases like glaucoma and cataracts. Both also damage blood vessels and arteries over time, leading to heart disease, stroke, and other cardiopulmonary conditions. While not everyone who smokes will get these conditions, those who are also diabetic have a much higher risk. There are also many other issues which may arise for those who are diabetic and smoke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking has been discovered to actually cause Type II Diabetes. Those who smoke are between 30% and 40% more likely to get the condition than those who don’t, when comparing individuals with similar dietary habits. Among those who are already diabetic, smoking also makes the condition much harder to control. Use of tobacco products raises blood sugar levels. In those who already have problems controlling their blood sugar, this can be detrimental. Not only that Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Smoking

Diabetes And Smoking

Tweet The information that smoking is bad for us is everywhere, but for diabetics, smoking can be even more damaging. Beyond the usual reasons, why shouldn’t I smoke if I have diabetes? Smoking is now proven to be an independent risk factor for diabetes, and amongst diabetics it increases the risk of complications. Diabetes complications already include heart disease, stroke and circulation problems. Smoking adds to the risk of developing all of these things. In some cases, smoking can double the likelihood of these conditions, as well as doubling the chances of suffering from kidney problems and erectile dysfunction. For type 2 diabetics, the major cause of death is cardiovascular disease. How does smoking increase my heart disease risk as a diabetic? Smoking and diabetes both increase the risk of heart disease in very similar ways, and so when combined, they greatly exacerbate the chances of suffering a heart related condition such as a heart attack or stroke. Both high levels of glucose in the blood and smoking damage the walls of the arteries in such a way that fatty deposits can build up much easier. As this occurs, the blood vessels narrow and make circulating blood much harder. When this happens to the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply the heart muscle with blood and therefore oxygen) a heart attack can occur. Similarly, a stroke is when not enough blood can get to the brain, and so anything that may limit blood flow increases the risks of a stroke. High blood glucose levels also have this effect on the blood vessels and blood flow, so if you smoke when you have diabetes, you are putting yourself at a much greater risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. I am not diabetic, but I am a smoker. Could smoking lead me to develop diabetes? Smoking is als Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Smoke Marijuana?

Can A Diabetic Smoke Marijuana?

I love California. This November, Californians will have the opportunity to vote on a measure that would legalize marijuana use and sale in the state. Adults over the age of 21 would be allowed to carry up to an ounce of marijuana, and they would be allowed to cultivate for personal usage up to 25 square feet of cannabis plants. As of April 2009, 56% of Californians surveyed supported the legalization and taxation of pot. Let me be clear: I like this idea because I think it’s silly to have so much of our criminal justice system tied up with drug charges, and because I giggle at the absurdity of the fact that our state government is essentially saying, “Well, if you can’t beat ’em…” In other words, my reasons for liking this proposal, and for liking California, have nothing to do with the drug itself. In fact, pot itself is a big open question for me– namely: Can a diabetic smoke pot? I don’t mean “can” here as a verb of possibility or survivability. What I mean is– is it a good idea for a type 1 diabetic to smoke pot? How does marijuana affect blood sugar control and management, in terms of both behavior and biology? Lacking any personal experience in the matter, I first turn to the internet to answer these questions. The first thing I note: many other people are wondering the same thing. Rarely does Google pre-fill queries I have about diabetes, but this one Google is all over: “marijuana and diabetes,” “marijuana diabetes type 1,” “marijuana diabetes type 2,” “marijuana diabetes treatment,” and so on. The results of these queries are full of accounts from people with the personal experience I don’t have. There are apparently many message boards, either diabetes-focused or pot-focused, that have touched on the question of whether Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1 There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2 How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes? We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3 The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control. If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4 Heart and kidney disease Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet) Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness) Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination) If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting Continue reading >>

Vaping And Type 2 Diabetes: How E-cigarettes May Affect Blood Sugar | Everyday Health

Vaping And Type 2 Diabetes: How E-cigarettes May Affect Blood Sugar | Everyday Health

The nicotine in e-cigarettes could also affect blood sugar. Research presented at a March 2011 meeting of the American Chemical Society suggested that nicotine caused hemoglobin A1C levels , the two- to three-month average of blood sugar levels, to rise by 34 percent. And those elevated A1C levels also indicate you may be at a higher risk of complications from diabetes, including eye disease, heart disease, and kidney disease, says Janet Zappe, RN, CDE , clinical program manager of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. We dont yet have all of the answers, and much of the research thats been done thus far is preliminary and doesnt meet the gold standard for research that is, being published in a peer-reviewed journal, and conducted with a randomized, placebo-controlled model. Researchers are still trying to answer many questions, such as: How do e-cigarettes affect your heart? The No. 1 cause of death for people with diabetes is cardiovascular, Zappe says. We already know that smoking increases the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease, she notes but do e-cigarettes do the same, especially for people with type 2 diabetes? What are the long-term effects of e-cigarettes? Because e-cigarettes are relatively newer to the scene, we still need to understand exactly how they affect the bodys risk for disease. Even though research is ongoing, most healthcare professionals feel we have enough evidence to take action. Heres a summary of their advice: Avoid e-cigarettes if you dont already smoke. If you're currently a nonsmoker, theres no reason to start puffing e-cigarettes, given their potential complications with type 2 diabetes. Used appropriately, e-cigarettes may be a good transitional choice to help y Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes: Risks, Effects, And How To Quit

Smoking And Diabetes: Risks, Effects, And How To Quit

Smoking and diabetes: Risks, effects, and how to quit Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C The health risks of smoking are well known, and most smokers already know the risks they are taking. For people with diabetes , however, smoking is a serious risk factor for numerous health issues they may face. Smoking may even cause diabetes. Quitting is the best course of action smokers can take for their health. However, some strategies may reduce the health effects for some of those with diabetes. Smoking and diabetes: Can smoking cause diabetes? Smokers are more likely to develop diabetes than non-smokers. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for at least 90 percent of cases worldwide. Type 2 diabetes is also closely linked to certain lifestyle factors, including smoking. In fact, smokers are 30-40 percent more likely than non-smokers to develop diabetes. People who have diabetes already and who smoke are more likely to have uncontrolled diabetes. Smoking damages cells and tissues, increasing inflammation . It also causes oxidative stress , which is when molecules called free radicals damage cells. Both these conditions are linked to an increased risk of diabetes. They can cause other health problems, as well, including cardiovascular disease. Research further suggests that heavy smoking increases abdominal fat . Even in people who aren't obese or overweight, excess abdominal fat is a risk factor for diabetes. The health risks of smoking are numerous, and researchers are constantly uncovering new health concerns associated with smoking. The habit of smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, while more than 16 million Americans have a smoking-related disease. cancer , including lung, oral, bladder, colon, pancr Continue reading >>

Sugar Or Cigarettes: Which Is Worse For You?

Sugar Or Cigarettes: Which Is Worse For You?

What kills more people: sugar or cigarettes? You may want to hold off before you answer this question. A closer look at the statistics behind what kills people could show a sweeter killer. Initially, people didn’t know that cigarettes could cause bad health. Media, doctors, and societies didn’t associate cigarettes with bad lungs and cancer. It had taken years before people understood that cigarettes caused damage to our bodies. This was because people didn’t feel pain and were not sick right after smoking one cigarette. Instead, a cigarette helped to take people’s stress and anxiety away. A cigarette made a person feel calm and gave them a burst of energy. One cigarette didn’t show any immediate harm. So why stop smoking if nothing instantly bad happens? The damage that happens from smoking cigarettes is not noticeable at first. You won’t see the damages that smoking causes until you wake up one morning with a cough. Over time, a smoker will face an increased risk of countless health problems. But it wasn’t until anti-smoking advertisements were released that people changed their opinion. More research on the health benefits of smoking was done, and experts concluded that smoking kills. Now everyone knows only too well the harm smoking can do. Cigarettes have been known to cause: Severe Genetic Damage Within Minutes Throat Cancer Stomach Cancer Lung Cancer Bladder Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Increased Stillbirth Risk Heart Attacks Stroke Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Cigarettes are bad for you, but people still smoke them around the world. This might be because it contains an addictive substance, nicotine. Nicotine stimulates dopamine in the brain, which is responsible for the pleasurable sensations that smokers feel. However, the more you smo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And E-cigs – Benefits And Risks

Diabetes And E-cigs – Benefits And Risks

Smoking can raise your blood pressure and increase your risk of developing heart disease. This is a major concern for people with diabetes who are more prone to heart problems. E-cigs are an alternative to smoking, but what are the benefits and risks when you have diabetes? Smoking cigarettes puts people at a higher risk of developing health problems such as lung disease, cancer, high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke. Cigarettes contain nicotine and a mixture of other chemicals that can be harmful to your health. Electronic cigarettes, referred to as e-cigarettes or e-cigs, can be used to help people stop smoking. People with diabetes have a compromised immune system and are more likely to develop heart disease and stroke. This means they should quit smoking. Using e-cigs may be a helpful way to do this. While trying e-cigs may be helpful, one of the risks of e-cigs is nicotine. This is the substance also found in regular cigarettes which can be addictive because it may boost your memory, improve your mood and minimize your urge to eat. Nicotine is dangerous since it increases your blood pressure, increases your risk of artery blockage and stroke. An e-cig looks like a real one, but does not contain the additional poisons found in actual cigarettes. However, e-cigs do provide nicotine. Studies have shown tissues in the blood vessels can break down as a result of constant exposure to nicotine. This leads to the formation of deposits of fat, which narrow the blood vessels and may lead to heart disease. E-cigs have a battery and a cartridge to hold nicotine and other liquids, such as flavorings, water and glycerin. Some are rechargeable and others are disposable. Smoking e-cigs is referred to as vaping. Because they taste good with certain flavorings, people may “ Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking And Diabetes

Smoking increases your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes. The more you smoke, the more chance you have of getting diabetes (DYE-uh-BEE-teez). If you smoke 16 to 25 cigarettes a day, your risk for Type 2 diabetes is 3 times greater than a non-smoker’s risk. When you quit smoking, your risk decreases during the years that follow. Smoking affects the way insulin works in your body. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not respond to the insulin (IN-suh-lin) made by the pancreas (PAN-kree-us). Insulin helps blood glucose, or glucose (GLOO-cose), enter the body’s cells for fuel. When you smoke, your body is less able to respond to insulin. When your body resists insulin, your glucose levels increase. Resistance does not start to reverse until you do not smoke for 10 to 12 hours. Smoking makes it harder to control your diabetes. Studies show that smokers have poorer glucose control than non-smokers do. Ex-smokers have the same blood glucose control as non-smokers. When you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, glucose control is very important. The A1c (read “A-one-C”) test checks how well you control your glucose level over 3 months. The goal is to keep your A1c at 7 percent or less. When you have diabetes and you smoke, your A1c level increases. If you quit smoking, your A1c level may decrease to the same level as a non-smoker’s. Smoking increases your risk for getting other problems from diabetes. When you have diabetes and smoke, your chances are greater for getting other health problems from diabetes. These other health problems are called complications (COM-pli-KAY-shuns). You can get serious eye problems, kidney problems, and nerve problems. You can get heart and blood vessel disease, such as heart attack, stroke, and hardening of the arteries, especially in the legs. E Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Have Type 1 Diabetes? Don’t Smoke.

Have Type 1 Diabetes? Don’t Smoke.

A new study finds it’s bad for you. But you knew that already, didn’t you? According to a new study, smoking may influence metabolic control and increase the risk of vascular complications in people with Type 1 diabetes. It also ups your A1C score. These risks come in addition to the health hazards of cancer and emphysema. (We’d like to add the word “duh” to these findings, because, you know, smoking is bad for you.) The study, published in Diabetes Care, compared the health of smokers and nonsmokers with Type 1 diabetes. Researchers found that smokers had higher A1C levels – 8.5 versus 7.9 in the non-smoking population. Smokers also had a worse lipid profile, and higher triglyceride and LDL (“bad” cholesterol) levels than non-smokers. The study used data from the T1D Exchange Registry in the United States and the Prospective Diabetes Follow-Up Registry in Germany and Austria. Researchers tracked 20,405 patients with Type 1 diabetes aged 18 and older who had been diagnosed for at least one year. Smokers were defined as having at least one cigarette per day. sponsor The study also revealed a large cultural difference in attitude towards smoking. Ten percent of the patients connected with the T1D Exchange in the U.S. were smokers, while a whopping 24.3 percent of those connected with the DPV centers in Europe identified as smokers. Such findings suggest that health care providers who care for the Type 1 community in Europe may want to up their efforts to help patients quit. The takeaway? Smoking is still bad for you, and it doesn’t get any less bad for you if you’re already dealing with a chronic condition. So if you smoke, quitting is good. If you want to quit smoking (and we really want you to quit), here are a few links to help get you started: Than Continue reading >>

Why Stop Smoking?

Why Stop Smoking?

I started to write a stop smoking column. But after researching nicotine, I’m thinking of taking the habit up myself. Yes, it kills more people than all the other bad habits I can think of put together. It makes diabetes far worse. But what a drug! Nicotine affects your brain much like cocaine does, but they don’t arrest you for having it. Nicotine hits your brain within 10–20 seconds after a puff and immediately starts raising dopamine levels. Dopamine is our “reward chemical”; it tells you “you’re doing the right thing, so feel good.” A family of enzymes called MAOs (monoamine oxidase) breaks down dopamine and serotonin, another feel-good chemical. Nicotine is an MAO inhibitor; it blocks MAOs, so you have more dopamine and serotonin, so you feel better right away. And you don’t need a prescription! Nicotine also promotes release of epinephrine (adrenaline) and endorphins, so you feel more energetic and more relaxed at the same time. (According to Wikipedia, small puffs/doses are more energizing, while higher doses/deeper puffs are more relaxing.) Nicotine makes you more alert and improves concentration. It relieves pain and anxiety. As a drug, it’s even better than sugar, but unlike sugar, it suppresses appetite and raises metabolism, making it great for weight loss. So why would anyone want to stop smoking? So Why Stop? According to the Web site Diabetes UK, “smoking can double the likelihood of [diabetes-related] heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and erectile dysfunction.” About.com says that, “Both [smoking and diabetes] can damage your heart and your circulation. Both can raise your blood pressure and your cholesterol levels. Smokers also have a harder time controlling their blood glucose levels, because insulin resistance is increa Continue reading >>

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