diabetestalk.net

Is Hypoglycemia Related To Diabetes?

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is often thought about as part of diabetes, but there is also non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is just as equally problematic. When blood sugar is too low, the cause is not as important as realizing the impact. Some of the effects of hypoglycemia are immediate while others take time to manifest, resulting in long term deficits in your health. What is Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, which again is the same as low blood sugar, is most often thought about in diabetics. This group of individuals often uses medications, including insulin, to lower their glucose, which is often high. When their glucose drops too low as a result of the medication, they are considered in a hypoglycemic state. However, an entire different segment of the population deals with non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs for reasons that are almost the exact opposite of why someone would develop diabetes. While diabetes arises as a result of excess carbohydrates in the diet, non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs from a lack of carbohydrates in the diet. Carbohydrates are essential as the preferred energy source for our body. Yes, the total amount of carbohydrate and the source should factor in, but carbohydrates are necessary. In addition to not eating enough carbohydrates, insufficient production of hormones and neurotransmitters (nervous system communicators) can lead to non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Contrary to common medical thought, this does not require the presence of a named disease of the glands that produce the chemicals that helps us keep glucose balanced. 4 Clues that You May Have Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Fatigue: The Number One Symptom of Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is the same as low blood sugar. Blood Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In An Individual With Diabetes

Hypoglycemia In An Individual With Diabetes

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a frequent event that can harm the quality of life of people with diabetes and their families. It is important to know the symptoms and how to treat it, as well as its causes and what to do to prevent it. Definition Hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose (sugar) level below 4 mmol/L, with or without symptoms. People at risk Some people with diabetes are at greater risk of hypoglycemia than others: *Gliclazide (Diamicron® and Diamicron®), Glimepiride (Amaryl®), Glyburide (Diabeta®), Nateglinide (Starlix®), Repaglinide (GlucoNorm®). Symptoms The symptoms of hypoglycemia fall into two categories. Symptoms caused by adrenaline secretion (adrenergic) These symptoms are usually the first to appear and should be considered "alarm bells": Trembling Palpitations Sweating Anxiety Hunger Nausea Tingling Pallor Symptoms caused by a lack of glucose in the brain (neuroglycopenic) If nothing is done, the following symptoms may occur: Difficulty concentrating Mood swings Confusion Weakness Drowsiness Blurred vision Difficulty speaking Headache Dizziness Moreover, if hypoglycemia occurs during the night, a person could experience: Profuse sweating Nightmares Restless sleep Headache upon awakening The symptoms can vary from person to person and from one episode to another. Sometimes no symptoms appear, particularly in people who have been diabetic for a long time or if blood glucose levels drop slowly. 3 levels of severity Mild hypoglycemia Symptoms caused by the production of adrenaline; The person is able to self-treat. Moderate hypoglycemia Symptoms caused by the production of adrenaline and a lack of glucose to the brain; The person is able to self-treat. Severe hypoglycemia Blood glucose usually less than 2.8 mmol/L; The individual require Continue reading >>

Recurrent Hypoglycemia: When Diabetes Is Not The Cause

Recurrent Hypoglycemia: When Diabetes Is Not The Cause

Diabetes, Nutritional And Metabolic Diseases, Diabetes Type 2 ABSTRACT: Most episodes of recurrent hypoglycemia occur in patients with diabetes mellitus and can be prevented by changes in medication, diet, or activity. However, persistent, unexplained hypoglycemia can indicate a potentially grave, often treatable, underlying disorder, such as insulinoma, or adrenal or pituitary insufficiency. Medication errors are another cause of unexplained hypoglycemia. A focused laboratory workup is essential; obtain a plasma or serum glucose level and serum insulin and C-peptide levels. Insulin levels should be suppressed (less than 6 μIU/mL) when the glucose level is below 60 mg/dL. “Normal” or high insulin and C-peptide levels suggest excessive endogenous insulin production. Hypoglycemia is a common event that typically occurs in persons with diabetes mellitus. In this context, hypoglycemia usually results from an imbalance among diabetic therapy, level of activity, and dietary intake. Therefore, management of hypoglycemia has become “scripted”: glucose administration, followed by adjustments in insulin or oral medications or diet. The simplicity of this approach can be deceptive, however. Practitioners may underestimate the impact of other hypoglycemic disorders that are not the direct result of diabetes or its treatment regimen. In this setting, hypoglycemia can indicate a serious disturbance in glucose regulation and can recur with devastating consequences. Determining the cause of hypoglycemic “outliers,” therefore, is critical. The potentially life-threatening consequences of sudden, unexpected hypoglycemia may endanger not only the affected person but others as well (eg, hypoglycemia in a driver of a motor vehicle). Here are 4 cases of hypoglycemia that occurre Continue reading >>

Can You Have Hypoglycemia Without Having Diabetes?

Can You Have Hypoglycemia Without Having Diabetes?

Hypoglycemia is a condition that occurs when the sugar levels in your blood are too low. Many people think of hypoglycemia as something that only occurs in people with diabetes. However, it can also occur in people who don’t have diabetes. Hypoglycemia is different from hyperglycemia, which occurs when you have too much sugar in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia can happen in people with diabetes if the body produces too much insulin. Insulin is a hormone that breaks down sugar so that you can use it for energy. You can also get hypoglycemia if you have diabetes and you take too much insulin. If you don’t have diabetes, hypoglycemia can happen if your body can’t stabilize your blood sugar levels. It can also happen after meals if your body produces too much insulin. Hypoglycemia in people who don’t have diabetes is less common than hypoglycemia that occurs in people who have diabetes or related conditions. Here's what you need to know about hypoglycemia that occurs without diabetes. Everyone reacts differently to fluctuations in their blood glucose levels. Some symptoms of hypoglycemia may include: You may have hypoglycemia without having any symptoms. This is known as hypoglycemia unawareness. Hypoglycemia is either reactive or non-reactive. Each type has different causes: Reactive hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia occurs within a few hours after a meal. An overproduction of insulin causes reactive hypoglycemia. Having reactive hypoglycemia may mean that you’re at risk for developing diabetes. Non-reactive hypoglycemia Non-reactive hypoglycemia isn't necessarily related to meals and may be due to an underlying disease. Causes of non-reactive, or fasting, hypoglycemia can include: some medications, like those used in adults and children with kidney failure any d Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

A prediabetes warning can be characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, and more. This phenomenon, despite how common it is, is not normal, nor is it healthy. It’s the classic sign of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and an early symptom of the prediabetes-related condition known as insulin resistance. Refined Carbs Can Cause Wild Mood Swings If you eat a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs, you will experience wild swings in blood sugar that make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. When you repeat this process day in and day out, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages (sodas, juices, sports drinks), your cells start to become resistant or numb to insulin. You end up needing more and more insulin to keep your blood sugars down. This is insulin resistance, a pre-diabetic condition that has become an epidemic. What is Reactive Hypoglycemia? Reactive hypoglycemia is characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, dizziness, sweating, shakiness, palpitations, anxiety, nausea, a sensation of hunger, and difficulty with concentration which occur after eating an abundance of sugar or refined carbs. These reactive hypoglycemia symptoms occur in the early stages of insulin resistance. Take a typical breakfast these days: swigging a large sweetened coffee drink and grabbing something from the Starbucks pastry case will give you a big energy surge as your sugar and insulin levels spike. What follows, however, are inevitable sugar crash symptoms as your blood sugar plummets. With this comes the low blood sugar fatigue. Insulin Levels May Be the First Sign That Something is Wrong Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes in an autoimmune disease where a person’s pancreas doesn’t produce insulin—a hormone needed to convert food into energy. It affects children and adults, comes on suddenly, and it cannot be prevented or cured. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and dangerous occurance with type 1 diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low it may lead to insulin shock, which is life-threatening if not cared for. Low blood sugar can happen when your body has too little food—or glucose—or when it produces too much insulin. Type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia symptoms So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of low blood sugar will vary depending on the person. However, people with type 1 diabetes—whether it’s been diagnosed or not—may experience one or more of the following: -Sweating and shaking -Blurry vision -Poor coordination -Dizziness or feeling lightheaded -Difficulty concentrating -Feeling anxious or irritable -Hunger or nausea -Erratic changes in behavior What to do if you experience low blood glucose symptoms Severely low blood-sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemic seizures, unconsciousness, coma, and death if left untreated. That’s why it’s important to see a doctor if you think you have low blood sugar so he or she can check your blood-glucose levels—look into whether type 1 diabetes may be a cause—and provide the necessary treatment. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

What Is It? Hypoglycemia is an abnormally low level of blood sugar (blood glucose). Because the brain depends on blood sugar as its primary source of energy, hypoglycemia interferes with the brain's ability to function properly. This can cause dizziness, headache, blurred vision, difficulty concentrating and other neurological symptoms. Hypoglycemia also triggers the release of body hormones, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine. Your brain relies on these hormones to raise blood sugar levels. The release of these hormones causes additional symptoms of tremor, sweating, rapid heartbeat, anxiety and hunger. Hypoglycemia is most common in people with diabetes. For a person with diabetes, hypoglycemia occurs because of too high a dose of diabetic medication, especially insulin, or a change in diet or exercise. Insulin and exercise both lower blood sugar and food raises it. Hypoglycemia is common in people who are taking insulin or oral medications that lower blood glucose, especially drugs in the sulfonylurea group (Glyburide and others). Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Pathophysiology, frequency, and effects of different treatment modalities The importance of strict glycemic control to limit the risk of diabetic vascular complications is indisputable, but many barriers obstruct its attainment. Hypoglycemia is recognized to be a major limitation in achieving good control in type 1 diabetes (1) but has been considered to be a minor problem of the treatment modalities used for type 2 diabetes (2). This may be a misperception based on inadequate information. The burden of covert hypoglycemia associated with oral antidiabetic agents may be underestimated, and with the increasing use of insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, the actual prevalence of hypoglycemia is likely to escalate. The frequency and pathophysiology of hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes and the relationship to different therapies was reviewed by conducting a literature search using the bibliographic database PubMed to identify publications in English from 1984 until 2005 related to hypoglycemia associated with treatment of type 2 diabetes, and the bibliographies of relevant articles were scrutinized for additional citations. Search terms included “type 2 diabetes,” “NIDDM,” “non-insulin-dependent diabetes,” “hypoglycemia,” and “hypoglycaemia.” PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF HYPOGLYCEMIA Normal physiological responses to hypoglycemia The human brain primarily uses glucose as its source of energy. Under normal conditions, the brain is unable to synthesize or store glucose and is exquisitely vulnerable to glucose deprivation. To protect the integrity of the brain, several physiological mechanisms have evolved to respond to and limit the effects of hypoglycemia (3–6). In humans, the initial response to a decline in blood glucose is suppression of endogenous insulin secretio Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin's job is to help glucose enter your cells where it's used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. You can have symptoms of hypoglycemia, but unless your blood glucose level is actually low when you have symptoms, you don't have hypoglycemia. The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Some people have trouble speaking and also feel weak. Talk with your doctor if you have symptoms of hypoglycemia, even if you only have one episode. HOW IS NON-DIABETIC HYPOGLYCEMIA DIAGNOSED? Your doctor can diagnose non-diabetic hypoglycemia by reviewing your symptoms, doing a physical exam, looking at your risk for diabetes, and checking your blood glucose level. Your doctor will also see whether you feel better after you eat or drink to raise your glucose to a normal level. Checking your blood glucose to see if it is actually low (about 55 mg/dL or less) when you're having symptoms is an important part of Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment

Passing out, loss of consciousness, seizures To diagnose non-diabetic hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask questions about any medicines you take. Hell want to know all about your health and any history of diseases or stomach surgery. Hell check your blood glucose level, especially when you are having symptoms. Hell also check to see if you feel better when your glucose goes back to a normal level. If your doctor suspects hypoglycemia, you may have to fast until you start to have symptoms. Hell test your blood glucose level at different times throughout the fast. To check for reactive hypoglycemia, you may have to take a test called a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT). For this, you take a special drink that raises your blood glucose. The doctor will check your blood glucose levels over the next few hours. Right away, you should reverse the low blood sugar by eating or drinking 15 to 20 grams of carbohydrates. You can take juice, hard candy, or glucose tablets. This will usually help your symptoms go away. Check your blood sugar again in 15 minutes and treat every 15 minutes if levels are still low. Call 911 if you dont feel well or if you cant get your blood sugar back up. For severe symptoms -- passing out, seizures , or confusion -- call 911 right away. If you have serious attacks, ask your doctor if you should keep a home glucagon kit. This hormone made in your pancreas causes your liver to release sugar. The kid contains a little bottle (the doctor will call it a vial) and a syringe to inject yourself with it. People youre with -- loved ones or caregivers -- should know how to give you the injection. For a long-term solution, how you treat hypoglycemia depends on what's causing it. If a medicine triggers your low blood sugar, you may need to ch Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Go to: ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the evaluation and management of hypoglycemia in patients without diabetes. Methods: Review of literature for the evaluation and management of non-diabetic hypoglycemia using Medline and PubMed. Results: Hypoglycemia (glucose <55 mg/dL) is uncommon in people without diabetes. Whipple’s triad (low plasma glucose concentration, clinical signs/symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia, and resolution of signs or symptoms when the plasma glucose concentration increases) should be documented in patients prior to embarking on evaluation. Medications should be reviewed. Critical illnesses, malnutrition, hormone deficiencies especially adrenal insufficiency, and nonislet cell tumors secreting IGF-II need be considered in those who are ill. Hypoglycemia can also follow bariatric surgery. In apparently healthy individuals, endogenous hyperinsulinism due to insulinoma, functional β-cell disorders, or the insulin autoimmune syndrome are possible, as are accidental, surreptitious or factitious causes of hypoglycemia. Tests performed during hypoglycemia can establish the cause in those whom illness or medications are not the cause. Testing may be done at the time of spontaneous development of symptoms. If this is not possible, it can be done in the setting of a prolonged supervised fast or during a mixed meal test. Endogenous hyperinsulinism is supported by insulin ≥3 uU/mL, c-peptide ≥0.2 nmol/L, proinsulin ≥5 pmol/L, β-hydroxybutyrate ≤2.7 mmol/L and undetectable sulfonylurea/meglitinide in the setting of hypoglycemia. Use of glucagon tolerance tests, c-peptide suppression tests, anti-insulin antibody testing and continuous glucose monitoring are discussed. Congenital causes of hypoglycemia, diagnosed primarily in neonates and children Continue reading >>

Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia)

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low blood glucose or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of glucose in your blood drops below normal. For many people with diabetes, that means a level of 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or less. Your numbers might be different, so check with your health care provider to find out what level is too low for you. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Symptoms of hypoglycemia tend to come on quickly and can vary from person to person. You may have one or more mild-to-moderate symptoms listed in the table below. Sometimes people don’t feel any symptoms. Severe hypoglycemia is when your blood glucose level becomes so low that you’re unable to treat yourself and need help from another person. Severe hypoglycemia is dangerous and needs to be treated right away. This condition is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Mild-to-Moderate Severe Shaky or jittery Sweaty Hungry Headachy Blurred vision Sleepy or tired Dizzy or lightheaded Confused or disoriented Pale Uncoordinated Irritable or nervous Argumentative or combative Changed behavior or personality Trouble concentrating Weak Fast or irregular heart beat Unable to eat or drink Seizures or convulsions (jerky movements) Unconsciousness Some symptoms of hypoglycemia during sleep are crying out or having nightmares sweating enough to make your pajamas or sheets damp feeling tired, irritable, or confused after waking up What causes hypoglycemia in diabetes? Hypoglycemia can be a side effect of insulin or other types of diabetes medicines that help your body make more insulin. Two types of diabetes pills can cause hypoglycemia: sulfonylureas and meglitinides . Ask your health care team if your diabetes medicine can cause hypoglycemia. Although ot Continue reading >>

More in diabetes