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Is Humulin Cloudy?

Intermediate-acting Insulins

Intermediate-acting Insulins

Comments: Human Insulin Isophane Suspension. Cloudy/ milky suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc. NPH + Aspart (Novolog ): Compatible NovoLog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. NPH + Lispro (Humalog ): Compatible Humalog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. NPH +Regular insulin: Always draw the Regular (clear) insulin into the syringe first. Phosphate-buffered insulins ( NPH insulin) should NOT be mixed with lente insulins. Zinc phosphate may precipitate, and the longer-acting insulin will convert to a short-acting insulin to an unpredictable extent. Currently available NPH and short-acting insulin formulations when mixed may be used immediately or stored for future use. Humulin N [Human insulin (rDNA origin) isophane suspension] is a crystalline suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc providing an intermediate-acting insulin with a slower onset of action and a longer duration of activity (up to 24 hours) than that of Regular human insulin. The time course of action of any insulin may vary considerably in different individuals or at different times in the same individual. As with all insulin preparations, the duration of action of Humulin N is dependent on dose, site of injection, blood supply, temperature, and physical activity. Humulin N is a sterile suspension and is for subcutaneous injection only. It should not be used intravenously or intramuscularly. The concentration of Humulin N is 100 units/mL (U100). It is a cloudy or milky suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc. The insulin substance (the cloudy material) settles at the bottom of the insulin reservoir, therefore, the Novolin N InnoLet must be rotated up Continue reading >>

Understanding R, N, And Premixed Insulins

Understanding R, N, And Premixed Insulins

Share: Sometimes due to choice, cost, insurance coverage you may find yourself on N, R, or pre-mixed insulin. The following is some information to understand what the types are, how they are taken, and who might be taking them. What is R insulin and when should I take it? Regular or R insulin is clear in color, considered short acting, and is available in names including: Humulin R, Novolin R, ReliOn R. This insulin starts working in 30 minutes and lasts for about 5-8 hours. Regular insulin is taken 30 minutes before meals. It helps to provide coverage for your meals. If you use in combination with N insulin, you would take it before breakfast and dinner. If skipping a meal, you would skip your R insulin. How much is R insulin? R insulin is considerably cheaper than rapid acting analogs such as Humalog or Novolog. Check with your pharmacy for exact pricing. What is N insulin and when should I take it? NPH (N) is a cloudy colored, intermediate acting insulin, and is available as Humulin N, Novolin N, ReliOn N. It starts working in about 1-3 hours, and can last for approximately 10-18 hours. N insulin helps to cover in between your meals and the N you take at breakfast will still be working at lunch to cover your meal. It is essential that you have lunch every day, about 4-5 hours after you inject your N at breakfast. If you do not have lunch, you will be at risk for going too low. The N you take at bed will work during the night to help regular your morning glucose levels. You should have a small bed time snack. NPH or N insulin would be taken with breakfast and before bed for better fasting glucose levels, however instead of giving it at bed, it may be given before dinner also. How much is N insulin? N insulin is a cheaper alternative to longer acting insulins. Check wi Continue reading >>

Insulins - Brand Names

Insulins - Brand Names

Sort Which types of insulin are clear? Which types are cloudy? Three CLEAR (1) rapid-acting (2) short-acting (3) long-acting Three CLOUDY (1) intermediate-acting (2) human mixture (3) analog mixture Which insulin mixtures include insulin analogs? Are they cloudy or clear? (1) insulin lispro protamine 75% / insulin lispro (Humalog Mix 75/25) (2) insulin lispro protamine 50% / insulin lispro 50% (Humalog 50/50) (3) insulin aspart protamine 70% / insulin aspart 30% (NovoLog Mix 70/30) CLOUDY Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin | Cs Mott Children's Hospital | Michigan Medicine

Types Of Insulin | Cs Mott Children's Hospital | Michigan Medicine

24 hours or more (glargine), 42 hours or more (degludec) Mixtures of insulin can sometimes be combined in the same syringe, for example, intermediate-acting and rapid- or short-acting insulin. Not all insulins can be mixed together. For convenience, there are premixed rapid- and intermediate-acting insulin. The insulin will start to work as quickly as the fastest-acting insulin in the combination. It will peak when each type of insulin typically peaks, and it will last as long as the longest-acting insulin. Examples include: 70% NPH and 30% regular (Humulin 70/30, Novolin 70/30). 50% lispro protamine and 50% lispro (Humalog Mix 50/50). 75% lispro protamine and 25% lispro (Humalog Mix 75/25). 70% aspart protamine and 30% aspart (NovoLog Mix 70/30). Insulin degludec injection (2015). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed December 30, 2015. Insulin detemir injection (2014). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin glargine (rDNA origin) injection (2015). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin glulisine (rDNA origin) injection (2014). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin isophane (NPH)/insulin regular injection (2013). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin isophane injection (2014). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin lispro injection (2014). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin regular (human) inhalation (2015). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Insulin regular (human) injection (2015). Facts and Comparisons eAnswers. Accessed May 13, 2015. Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

HUMULIN® N (human insulin [rDNA origin]) isophane) Suspension DESCRIPTION HUMULIN N (human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane) suspension is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN N is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN N is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN N is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN N contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.35 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.5. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. Continue reading >>

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

Learn how to mix insulin clear to cloudy. Drawing up and mixing insulin is a skill that nurses will utilize on the job. Insulin is administered to patients who have diabetes. These type of patients depend on insulin so their body can use glucose. Therefore, nurses must be familiar with how to mix insulin. The goal of this article is to teach you how to mix insulin. Below are a video demonstration and step-by-step instructions on how to do this. How to Mix Insulin Purpose of mixing insulin: To prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient). Most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting). Important Points to Keep in Mind: Never mix Insulin Glargine “Lantus” with any other type of insulin. Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action. Check the patient’s blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they aren’t hypoglycemic …if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify md for further orders. Key Concept for Mixing Insulin: Draw up CLEAR TO CLOUDY Remember the mnemonic: RN (Regular to Nph) Why? It prevents contaminating the vial of clear insulin with the cloudy insulin because if contaminated it can affect the action of the insulin. Why does this matter because they will be mixed in the syringe? You have 5 to 10 minutes to give the insulin mixed in the syringe before the action of the insulins are affected Demonstration on Drawing Up Clear to Cloudy Insulin Steps on How to Mix Insulin 1. Check the doctor’s order and that you have the correct medication: Doctor’s order says: “10 units of Humulin R and 12 units of Humulin N subcutaneous before b Continue reading >>

Humulin N (insulin Isophane Aka Insulin Nph)

Humulin N (insulin Isophane Aka Insulin Nph)

Humulin N is one brand of the man-made form of insulin known as insulin NPH or insulin isophane. It is produced by Eli Lilly and Company using recombinant DNA technology from a non-pathological strain of E. coli. It combines human insulin with protamine sulfate to create a crystalline suspension. Humulin N is used to help lower blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Humulin N is one of the few insulins available without a prescription in some states (although you must ask for it at the pharmacy counter, since it has to stay refrigerated). How Does Humulin N Work? Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin, which begins to take effect between one and four hours after injection. Its peak effect occurs four to 12 hours after injection and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours after injection. For some people, it can take 24 hours to clear out of their system. Humulin N acts like your body’s natural insulin to lower or normalize your blood sugar levels. It is often used in conjunction with a short-acting insulin and/or other oral anti-diabetic medications (such as Metformin). This insulin can also be mixed with certain other insulins, such as regular insulin. Consult with your doctor on whether mixing insulins is right for you. They can also instruct you on the correct way to do so. Humulin N can be used to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes. Who Should Not Take Humulin N? Do not take Humulin N if you are experiencing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not take Humulin N if you are allergic to insulin isophane or any of its ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. It may also contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. If your doctor prescribes Humulin N, you will inject Continue reading >>

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Intermediate-acting Human Insulins and Analogs Intermediate-acting insulin with a longer onset and duration of activity when compared to regular insulin; hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein; usually requires >= 2 injections/day when used as a basal insulin. Humulin N/Novolin N Subcutaneous Inj Susp: 1mL, 100U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. NOTE: A consensus algorithm issued by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes lists basal or intermediate-acting insulin as a second line or third line agent in patients with type 2 diabetes not controlled on oral drugs; metformin is the initial recommended therapy in all type 2 diabetics without contraindications. Once insulin is added, therapy can be intensified (e.g., addition of prandial insulin) to achieve optimal glycemic control. In patients who are receiving a sulfonylurea, the sulfonylurea should be discontinued when insulin therapy is initiated. The total daily dose is given as 1 to 2 injections per day, given 30 to 60 minutes before a meal or bedtime. Some patients may initially be given a single daily dose 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast, but 24-hour blood glucose control may not be possible with this regimen. Thus, a second injection given 30 to 60 minutes before dinner or bedtime may be required. When oral agents are used concomitantly in type 2 DM, a low initial dose of NPH insulin (e.g., 10 units) is often given in the evening. When used for intensive insulin therapy, NPH insulin is frequently mixed with a quick-acting insulin and given twice daily, although some patients will require more than 2 injections of NPH insulin daily when used as a basal insulin. A common Continue reading >>

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

What does it mean when your insulin gets cloudy after several weeks? Insulin can changewhen stored, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Many factors speed up the change, including warm temperatures and shaking the insulin bottle. Thats why the ADA recommends that you avoid carrying your insulin in your pocket, especially if you are an active person. Keep it in a refrigerator, cupboard, purse, briefcase or backpack, and protect it from heat and motion. If regular insulin becomes cloudy, throw it away, says the ADA. It has lost its effectiveness, and wont keep your blood sugar from getting too high. If your insulin is a mix of regular and NPH or ultralente insulins, you may be getting NPH or ultralente in the bottle of regular insulin. This, too, will make it cloudy. If in doubt, discard the old bottle and replace it with a new one. Reprinted from 101 Tips for Improving Your Blood Sugar by the University of New Mexico Diabetes Care Team. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Thanks for signing up for our newsletter! You should see it in your inbox very soon. Continue reading >>

How To Prepare Two Types Of Insulin In One Syringe

How To Prepare Two Types Of Insulin In One Syringe

A step-by-step guide to combine two types of insulin in a single syringe ​People with diabetes may be prescribed two types of insulin to be taken at the same time. To reduce the number of insulin injections, it is common to combine two types of insulin in a single syringe using r​apid-acting (clear) insulin with either an intermediate or a long-acting (​​cloudy) insulin.​ ​ ​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Follow These Steps to Prepare the Injection: Prepare your supplies and remove the insulin vials from the fridge half an hour before your injection. Check their expiry dates. Discard the vial six weeks after opening or as per the manufacturer’s guide. Roll the vial of cloudy insulin (intermediate or long-acting insulin) until the white powder has dissolved. Do NOT shake the vial. Clean the rubber stopper of the insulin vials with an alcohol wipe or a cotton ball dipped in alcohol. Draw air into the syringe by pulling the plunger down. The amount of air drawn should be equal to the dose of cloudy insulin that you require. With the vial standing upright, insert the needle into the vial containing the cloudy insulin. Inject air into the vial and remove the needle. Repeat the steps with clear insulin. Draw air into the syringe that is equal to the dose of clear insulin you require. Insert the needle into the vial containing the clear insulin and inject air into the vial. Do NOT remove the needle. With the needle in the vial, turn the syringe and insulin vial upside down, and draw out your dose of clear insulin. Read the line markings on the syringe to make sure you have drawn the correct amount of insulin. Insert the needle back into the vial containing the cloudy insulin. Do NOT push the plunger. Turn the syringe and insulin vial upside down, and draw out y Continue reading >>

Nph Insulin

Nph Insulin

NPH insulin, also known as isophane insulin, is an intermediate–acting insulin given to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.[3] It is used by injection under the skin once to twice a day.[1] Onset of effects is typically in 90 minutes and they last for 24 hours.[3] Versions are available that come premixed with a short–acting insulin, such as regular insulin.[2] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] NPH insulin is made by mixing regular insulin and protamine in exact proportions with zinc and phenol such that a neutral-pH is maintained and crystals form.[1] There are human and pig insulin based versions.[1] Protamine insulin was first created in 1936 and NPH insulin in 1946.[1] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.[4] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 2.23 to 10.35 USD per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[5] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds while in the United States this amount costs about 134.00 USD.[2][6] Chemistry[edit] NPH insulin is cloudy and has an onset of 1–4 hours. Its peak is 6–10 hours and its duration is about 10–16 hours. History[edit] Hans Christian Hagedorn (1888–1971) and August Krogh (1874–1949) obtained the rights for insulin from Banting and Best in Toronto, Canada. In 1923 they formed Nordisk Insulin laboratorium, and in 1926 with August Kongsted he obtained a Danish Royal Charter as a non-profit foundation. In 1936, Hagedorn and B. Norman Jensen discovered that the effects of injecte Continue reading >>

Humulin R (vial) Solution For Injection - Mydr.com.au

Humulin R (vial) Solution For Injection - Mydr.com.au

This leaflet answers some common questions about HUMULIN. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking with your doctor or pharmacist. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date shown on the final page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. Make sure you speak to your pharmacist, nurse or doctor to obtain the most up to date information on this medicine. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.lilly.com.au. The updated leaflet may contain important information about HUMULIN and its use that you should be aware of. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking HUMULIN against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with this medicine. You may need to read it again. HUMULIN is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin to control your blood sugar level. Extra insulin is therefore needed. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type 1 diabetes - also called juvenile onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes - also called maturity onset diabetes. Patients with type 1 diabetes always require insulin to control their blood sugar levels. Some patients with type 2 diabetes may also require insulin after initial treatment with diet, exercise and tablets. HUMULIN is identical to the insulin produced by the pancreas. There are 3 different types of HUMULIN vials: Your doctor will tell you the type of HUMULIN that is best suited to you. The duration of action of the insulin you inject will vary according to the type Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Insulin Type

Insulin Type

Insulin Type: Rapid-acting analogue (clear) Humalog (insulin Lispro) NovoRapid (insulin Aspart) Apidra (insulin glulisine) Onset Peak Humalog 1-2 h NovoRapid 1- 1.5 h Apidra 1-1.5 h Duration Humalog 3.5 - 4.75 h Novorapid 3 -5 h Apidra 3 - 5 h Considerations Client should eat within 10–15 minutes of injection. Insulin Compatibility Rapid-acting insulin can be mixed with N, NPH. Mixture should be given within 15 minutes of a meal. Insulin Type: Short-acting analogue (clear) Humulin R Novolin ge Toronto Onset 30 minutes Peak 2 - 3 hours Duration 6.5h Considerations Should be given 30 - 45 minutes prior to meals. Insulin Type: Intermediate-acting (cloudy) Novolin ge NPH Humulin N Onset 1 – 3 hours Peak 5 - 8 hours Duration Up to 18 hours Considerations Must be adequately re-suspended before injecting. Insulin Compatibility N or NPH & short-acting insulin may be mixed & used immediately or stored, refrigerated, for future use. Pre-filled syringes should be stored in the fridge, with needle tips up. They are stable for 1 month. NPH or N cannot be mixed with Lentus or Levemir insulin. Insulin Type: Long - acting analogues (clear) Lantus (insulin glargine) Levemir (insulin detemir) Onset 90 min Peak not applicable Duration Up to 24 h (glargine 24 h, determir 16-24 h) Considerations Lantus is available in vials, catridges & pre-filled disposable pens (SoloStar). Levemir is only available in catridges. Both Lantus and Levemir are clear. Clients must be alerted to the potential danger of confusing Lantus or Levamir with other clear insulin (rapid or short-acting insulins). Use of pre-filled syringes are not recommended Insulin Compatibility Glargine and Levemir cannot be mixed with any other insulin or solution Insulin Type: Premixed (cloudy) A single vial contains a fixed ra Continue reading >>

Humulin N, 100 Units

Humulin N, 100 Units

INFORMATION FOR THE PATIENT WARNINGS THIS LILLY HUMAN INSULIN PRODUCT DIFFERS FROM ANIMAL-SOURCE INSULINS BECAUSE IT IS STRUCTURALLY IDENTICAL TO THE INSULIN PRODUCED BY YOUR BODY'S PANCREAS AND BECAUSE OF ITS UNIQUE MANUFACTURING PROCESS. ANY CHANGE OF INSULIN SHOULD BE MADE CAUTIOUSLY AND ONLY UNDER MEDICAL SUPERVISION. CHANGES IN STRENGTH, MANUFACTURER, TYPE (E.G., REGULAR, NPH, LENTE), SPECIES (BEEF, PORK, BEEF-PORK, HUMAN), OR METHOD OF MANUFACTURE (rDNA VERSUS ANIMAL-SOURCE INSULIN) MAY RESULT IN THE NEED FOR A CHANGE IN DOSAGE. SOME PATIENTS TAKING HUMULIN (HUMAN INSULIN, rDNA ORIGIN) MAY REQUIRE A CHANGE IN DOSAGE FROM THAT USED WITH ANIMAL-SOURCE INSULINS. IF AN ADJUSTMENT IS NEEDED, IT MAY OCCUR WITH THE FIRST DOSE OR DURING THE FIRST SEVERAL WEEKS OR MONTHS. DIABETES Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland that lies near the stomach. This hormone is necessary for the body's correct use of food, especially sugar. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet your body's needs. To control your diabetes, your doctor has prescribed injections of insulin products to keep your blood glucose at a near-normal level. You have been instructed to test your blood and/or your urine regularly for glucose. Studies have shown that some chronic complications of diabetes such as eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve disease can be significantly reduced if the blood sugar is maintained as close to normal as possible. The American Diabetes Association recommends that if your premeal glucose levels are consistently above 140 mg/dL or your hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) is more than 8%, consult your doctor. A change in your diabetes therapy may be needed. If your blood tests consistently show below-normal glucose levels you should also let Continue reading >>

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