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Is Humulin A Fast Acting Insulin?

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

For people who need to take external or supplemental insulin (insulin your body did not produce but that was instead made by a pharmaceutical company), there are several different types and kinds of insulin. The insulin you take will depend on your personal needs. Different types of insulin work differently in different people. The University of California, San Francisco explains that insulin “was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin.” Here’s a chart of how the types of insulin work to replicate the normal pancreatic delivery of insulin and how they are typically used. Type of Insulin Brand (Generic) Onset Peak Duration Rapid-Acting Apidra (glulisine), Humalog (lispro), Novolog (aspart) 15 minutes 1 or 2 hours 2 to 4 hours Regular- or Short-Acting Humulin R, Novolin R (human recombinant) 30 minutes 2 to 3 hours 3 to 6 hours Intermediate-Acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin isophane)) 2 to 4 hours 4 to 12 hours 12 to 18 hours Long-Acting or Basal Insulin Lantus (glargine), Levemir (detemir), Basaglar (glargine) 2 to 4 hours lower peak 24 hours Ultra Long-Acting Toujeo (glargine), Tresiba (degludec) 6 hours small peak 36 hours Inhaled Insulin Afrezza (insulin human) 15 minutes 30 minutes 3 hours Rapid-acting insulin analogs (Insulin Aspart, insulin Lyspro, Insulin Glulisine): Usually taken as a bolus before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating or to correct for high blood glucose. This type of insulin is often used with longer-acting insulin, which is used to cover the body’s metabolic need for insulin. Short-acting synth Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

Generic Name: insulin isophane (IN soo lin EYE soe fane) Brand Names: HumuLIN N, HumuLIN N KwikPen, NovoLIN N, Relion NovoLIN N What is Humulin N? Humulin N (insulin isophane) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is an intermediate-acting insulin that starts to work within 2 to 4 hours after injection, peaks in 4 to 12 hours, and keeps working for 12 to 18 hours. Humulin N is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humulin N may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use Humulin N if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Humulin N. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humulin N if you are allergic to insulin isophane, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Do not give Humulin N to a child without a doctor's advice. To make sure Humulin N is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using Continue reading >>

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Left untreated, high blood sugar levels can cause many problems, such as heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin R and Humalog are two different types of insulin that can help lower your blood sugar level. These drugs work in slightly different ways. In general, insulin lowers your blood sugar level by signaling to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also signals your liver to stop making sugar. Depending on the type and severity of your diabetes, you may need to take insulin. We’ll compare and contrast Humulin R and Humalog to help you decide if one may be a good choice to treat your diabetes. Humulin R is a brand name for regular insulin. It is a short-acting insulin. That means that it takes about 30 minutes to reach your bloodstream and works for about three to six hours. Humalog is a brand name for insulin lispro, which is a fast-acting insulin. It takes about 15 minutes to start working, but it only lasts two to four hours. The following table compares more features of these two drugs. Humulin R Humalog What drug is it? Regular insulin (short-acting insulin) Insulin lispro (fast-acting insulin) What’s it used for? Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No Yes Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe. Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen How much do I take? Your doctor will tell you what dose to inject. This depends on your blood sugar readings and the Continue reading >>

Injected Insulin

Injected Insulin

How it works: Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that stimulates cells in the body to remove glucose from the blood for storage or usage. Normally, insulin is released when the body has high amounts of sugar in the blood, such as after a meal, to bring levels back into a normal range. Who uses it: People with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes use insulin. In-Depth Article: Insulins Unplugged – an overview of the different varieties of insulin available today. Other articles: FDA Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar - First "Biosimilar" Insulin in the US Basal vs. Prandial: Insulins can be divided into two categories based on function: basal (long-acting insulin) and prandial (rapid-acting or “mealtime” insulin). Basal insulin is designed to be injected once or twice daily to provide a constant level of insulin action throughout the day. Basal insulin helps keep blood sugars at a consistent level when you are not eating, but it is not enough to cover glucose spikes after mealtime. Prandial insulins, on the other hand, are taken at mealtime and act rapidly on the body, serving to bring down the high sugar levels following meals. Analog vs. Human Insulin: There are also two types of insulin structures: human insulin and analog insulin. Human insulins were developed first and are essentially identical in structure to the insulin produced in the body. Analog insulins are similar in structure but have minor biological modifications to give them desirable properties. While analog insulins cost more, they generally lead to less hypoglycemia and weight gain. Prandial insulin analogs tend to act faster than human insulin. Approved Insulins: Basal/Long-Acting: Analog Lantus and Toujeo (insulin glargine) Levemir (insulin detemir) Tresiba (insul Continue reading >>

Humulin 70/30

Humulin 70/30

Generic Name: insulin isophane and insulin regular (IN su lin EYE soe fane and IN su lin REG ue lar) Brand Names: HumuLIN 70/30, HumuLIN 70/30 KwikPen, NovoLIN 70/30, ReliOn/NovoLIN 70/30 What is Humulin 70/30? Humulin 70/30 contains a combination of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a intermediate-acting insulin. Insulin regular is an short-acting insulin. This combination insulin starts to work within 10 to 20 minutes after injection, peaks in 2 hours, and keeps working for up to 24 hours. Humulin 70/30 is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Humulin 70/30 may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important information Do not use Humulin 70/30 if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Humulin 70/30. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humulin 70/30 if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humulin 70/30 is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazo Continue reading >>

Humulin R (concentrated) (u-500)

Humulin R (concentrated) (u-500)

Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Concentrated (U-500) insulin is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. U-500 insulin is five times more concentrated than regular U-100 insulin. U-500 insulin is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus who have significant daily insulin needs (more than 200 units per day). U-500 insulin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. It's In The Genes - Record Your Family Health History Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia ( low blood sugar ). To make sure U-500 insulin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: low levels of potassium in your blood ( hypokalemia ). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin ). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be different while you are breast-feeding. U-500 insulin is concentrated and contains 500 units of insulin in each milliliter (mL). This is five times more concentrated than regular U-100 insulin, which contains 100 units per mL. Measure each dose of U-500 insulin carefully. Using too much insulin can lead to ins Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Humulin-n

Humulin-n

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. May contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. Cartridge/KwikPen Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, Continue reading >>

Humulin 70-30

Humulin 70-30

HUMULIN® 70/30 (70% human insulin isophane) Suspension and (30% human insulin) Injection, [rDNA origin] DESCRIPTION HUMULIN 70/30 (70% human insulin isophane suspension and 30% human insulin injection [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN 70/30 is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation and mixing with human insulin injection. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN 70/30 is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN 70/30 is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN 70/30 contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.24 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.8. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. For Consumers What are the possible side effects of insulin isophane and insulin regular? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin isophane and insulin regular. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of l Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro: A Fast-acting Insulin Analog

Insulin Lispro: A Fast-acting Insulin Analog

Research has established the importance of maintaining blood glucose levels near normal in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Short-acting insulin analogs are designed to overcome the limitations of regular short-acting insulins. Compared with regular human insulin, the analog insulin lispro offers faster subcutaneous absorption, an earlier and greater insulin peak and a more rapid post-peak decrease. Insulin lispro begins to exert its effects within 15 minutes of subcutaneous administration, and peak levels occur 30 to 90 minutes after administration. Duration of activity is less than five hours. Rates of insulin allergy, lipodystrophy, hypoglycemia and abnormal laboratory test results are essentially the same in patients using insulin lispro and in those using regular human insulin. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)1 established the importance of maintaining near-normal blood glucose levels in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. In these patients, intensive therapeutic regimens have been found to delay the onset and reduce the progression of microvascular complications by 50 to 75 percent as compared with conventional regimens. Although no large-scale investigations have been completed, smaller studies have reported similar benefits for intensive therapeutic regimens in patients with type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes.2 Primary care physicians provide medical care for 75 percent of children and 90 to 95 percent of adults with diabetes.3 Regardless of the type of diabetes, improved glycemic control often can be achieved with individualized tools for patient self-management, carefully formulated nutrition plans and the use of alternative insulin regimens.4 Overview of Insulin Insulin is necessary Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-60 minutes 3-5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 3-5 hours NovoLog (insulin aspart) Clear 5-15 minutes 40-50 minutes 3-5 hours Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 1½-2 hours 6-8 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin NPH) Cloudy 1-4 hours 4-12 hours 14-24 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1-2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly Continue reading >>

Humulin-n

Humulin-n

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. May contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. Cartridge/KwikPen Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, Continue reading >>

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Diabetes & Insulin In diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or use it properly. This causes your blood sugar to go too high. Oral medications, like metformin, may help your body to use insulin more efficiently. Other oral medications can help your body make more insulin. However, these medicines often work for only a few years. When the oral medications stop working, you will need to give yourself background and/or mealtime insulin shots to help control your blood sugar. If you need insulin, it does not mean that you have failed. It is just a part of diabetes. Background insulin can help control your blood sugar when you are not eating. However, it does not cover the carbs that you eat at meals. If the dose of background insulin is raised to cover spikes in blood sugars that happen after you eat, your body will have too much insulin in between your meals and while you sleep. This can cause your blood sugar to go too low. This is called hypoglycemia. If you have high blood sugars after meals, this can cause tiredness, irritability, blurry vision, more frequent urination and thirst. Over time, high blood sugars can damage your feet, hands, and eyes. By adding mealtime insulin you can better match the insulin to what your body would produce if you did not have diabetes. This will help prevent both low and high blood sugars so that you feel better and get less damage from the diabetes. What is Insulin? Natural insulin is made from the pancreas to match what the body needs so your blood sugar stays in a normal range. The pancreas makes some amount of insulin all the time, called background or basal insulin. Background insulin helps to supply fuel to your muscles and controls the glucose that is released from your liver. Every time you eat, the pancreas releases a Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Short-acting Insulins

Short-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Onset: 30 minutes Peak: 2.5 - 5 hours Duration: 4 - 12 hours Solution: Clear Comments: Best if administered 30 minutes before a meal. Mixing NPH: If Regular insulin is mixed with NPH human insulin, the Regular insulin should be drawn into the syringe first. Aspart - Novolog ®: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Novolog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Lispro - Humalog ®: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Humalog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Mixtures should not be administered intravenously. When mixing insulin in a syringe, draw up the quickest acting insulin first (e.g. draw up Humalog or Novolog before drawing up Regular Insulin, or draw up Regular insulin before Novolin N (NPH) or Lente insulin. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Insulin is a polypeptide hormone that controls the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. This activity occurs primarily in the liver, in muscle, and in adipose tissues after binding of the insulin molecules to receptor sites on cellular plasma membranes. Insulin promotes uptake of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in most tissues. Also, insulin influences carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism by stimulating protein and free fatty acid synthesis, and by inhibiting release of free fatty acid from adipose cells. Insulin increases active glucose transport through muscle and adipose cellular membranes, and promotes conversion of intracellular glucose and free fatty acid to the appropriate storage forms (glycogen and triglyceride, respectively). Although the liver does not require active glucose transport, insulin increases hepatic gl Continue reading >>

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