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Is Hummus Ok For A Diabetic To Eat?

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Make It Healthier: Hummus

Make It Healthier: Hummus

Hummus is a blend of chickpeas, garlic, lemon juice and sesame seed paste (tahini). It is now viewed by many of us as a grocery staple, with a recent survey showing that 41 per cent of us have a tub in the fridge – almost twice as many as any of our European counterparts. In fact, we chomp our way through a staggering £60m worth every year but few of us are aware of how calorific and high in fat it can be. According to research by the World Cancer Research Fund, a study of 2,000 people showed most of us have a lack of understanding about the calorie content of everyday foods. Hummus was one of those foods whose calorie content was underestimated. 100g of hummus contains: 320Kcal – 7.7g protein – 8.8g carbs 0.6g sugars – 27.2g fat 2.6g saturates – 1.1g salt If you think how moreish it is and the fact the label says ‘eat within two days’, you can see how easily it is to take in far more calories and fat than you realise. Even the reduced-fat hummus, which contains at least 30 per cent less fat than the standard product, still contains a lot of fat and is only 1.1g of fat away from being labelled ‘red’, ie high in fat. 100g of reduced-fat hummus contains: 239Kcal – 9.3g protein – 11.3g carbs 0.7g sugars – 16.4g fat 1.9g saturates – 1.0 g salt Find out more about traffic light labelling. Make your own The good news is that you can easily make your own low-fat hummus. Cut the fat and calories by using more chickpeas and replacing the oil and sesame seed paste with natural yogurt, garlic cloves, lemon and pepper, and you’ll still have a delicious dip. This works well as a sandwich filler. To make it go further you can add grated carrot or cucumber. It is also important to think about what you are dipping in the hummus. Good choices include carrot Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Hummus?

Can Diabetics Eat Hummus?

If you have diabetes, you know the importance of maintaining stable blood glucose levels -- and that certain foods can trigger spikes or help keep them stable. The main ingredient in hummus is chickpea, also called garbanzo bean. Beans and other legumes, though high in carbs, have enough fiber and protein to help keep your blood sugar at a steady level. Video of the Day In 2012, a study published in the "Archives of Internal Medicine" found that diabetics who ate at least 1 cup per day of legumes for 3 months as part of a low glycemic index diet improved their glucose tolerance, with an associated reduction in their risk for coronary heart disease. Because hummus is mostly beans, it's an easy way to add legumes to your diet. One-third of a cup is a serving of hummus, according to the American Diabetes Association's "Choose Your Foods: Exchange Lists for Diabetes." Each serving contains around 15 grams of carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat. You can eat hummus as a dip for vegetables, on top of a salad or spread on sandwiches or wraps in place of mayonnaise. Continue reading >>

13 Snacks For Type Ii Diabetics

13 Snacks For Type Ii Diabetics

Do you or a loved one have type II diabetes? If so, finding healthy snacks can be difficult, especially when trying to control blood sugar. Most snacks are packed with carbs and will send insulin levels through the roof. Not good. The key is creating delicious snacks that won’t cause blood sugar spikes, taste good, and will fill you up. That’s exactly what we did in this short list. P.S. If you’re into healthy eating tools, check out our awesome Healthy Salad Dressing Recipes Magnet and Gluten-Free and Dairy Free Conversion Magnets at the end of this article! . 13 Snacks for Type II Diabetics Popcorn made in Coconut Oil Air popped popcorn made with coconut oil is one of the best healthy snacks for diabetics. It’s high in fiber and can easily be made in about 5 minutes on the stove. Sprinkle a little sea salt on top, and enjoy! Albacore Tuna It depends on your personal taste buds, but for those who like tuna, it makes a truly great snack. The high amounts of protein will also help curb cravings, and the omega-3 fatty acids help to level blood sugar. Make sure the tuna is albacore, and get the organic brand if it’s in the budget. Baby Carrots Simple, easy, and basic is sometimes the best. The beta-carotene, fiber, and antioxidants will help to level blood sugar and keep you feeling full. 8-12 carrots is a good amount and is less than 25 grams total of carbohydrates. Hummus with Raw Veggies This is another delicious snack diabetics can enjoy without any guilt. Hummus is high in fiber and healthy fats and low in carbs. Take around 1/3 of a cup of hummus and dip with bell peppers, carrots, cucumber, celery, or broccoli. Nuts Nuts like almonds, cashews, and pecans make for a great healthy snack. They are full of high quality fats, have virtually 0 carbs, and contain Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

Snacking can help or hinder your glycemic control…. You are the force behind which occurs. Whether we are addressing snacking between meals or evening and bedtime snacks, some familiar mistakes are described below with some helpful tips to conquer those slip-ups. 1. Too Many Carbs Ask anyone what their favorite snacks are…. They are nearly all high carbohydrate foods. Crackers, pretzels, chips, cookies…. All go-to snacks for kids and adults alike. Carbohydrate content of snacks is typically recommended at 15-30 grams. Just one cup of the thin pretzel sticks contains 36 grams of carbohydrate. An 8-ounce container of lowfat strawberry yogurt contains 43 grams of carbohydrate. Only 15 Triscuit-type crackers contains 45 grams of carbohydrate. It is easy to eat more than you need. Tip: Read labels carefully for serving size and total carbohydrate. 2. Not Enough Carbs On the flip side, many people with diabetes go overboard and avoid carbohydrate at snack time. In reality, you need some carbohydrate continuously through the day for energy. Some common low-carbohydrate snacks: 1 ounce of cheese (contains zero carbohydrate), carrot and celery sticks with ranch dressing (about 8 grams of carbohydrate), or ¼ cup of roasted almonds (7 grams of carbohydrate). Remember that typical recommendations are for 15-30 grams of carbohydrate in a snack. Tip: Don’t be afraid to include some carbs in your snack, just be informed about how much you are eating. 3. Caught Without a Plan You are driving the kids to and from extracurricular activities, or you have a crazy day at work, or you are on a business trip…. Hectic schedules can certainly interfere with your eating plan. The best laid plans may get side tracked. But, having a plan in place in the beginning is the key to success. Continue reading >>

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure. Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks. Foods high in protein High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include: roasted chickpeas apples or celery with almond butter almonds, walnuts, or pistachios trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients hard-boiled eggs plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit diced avocado and cherry tomatoes snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory. For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack. High-fiber snacks Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as well. People with diabetes can try some of these high-fiber snacks: smoothies blended with high-fiber, non-starchy vegetables sprouted, whole-grain breads whole-grain or bean pastas oatmeal, mixed wi Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Pretzels Pretzels have a healthy image, but a glance at the ingredients list reveals that their wholesome reputation is grossly undeserved. Nearly every brand is made from the same basic ingredients: white flour (wheat flour that’s been stripped of its nutrients and fiber), yeast, salt, and maybe some vegetable oil or corn syrup. It’s obvious from its subpar ingredient list that this popular snack is pretty much devoid of nutrition. Pretzels are baked, not fried like potato chips, which saves you a few calories, but the white, refined carbs do a number on your blood sugar and do little to satisfy your appetite. Skip the carb-fest and opt for a more balanced and filling snack that includes some protein to help steady your sugars. Great choices include a rice cake with reduced-fat cheese, a handful of pistachio nuts in the shell, or a nonfat Greek yogurt. Looking for tips on how to manage diabetes? Give these lifestyle changes a shot. Continue reading >>

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living W Continue reading >>

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

They’re a common part of traditional diets in India and Latin America, but in western repasts, legumes or pulses — that’s lentils, dried beans, and chick peas — have generally been a culinary afterthought. That may soon change, however, thanks to new research suggesting legumes alone can improve the health of diabetics. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicines, was funded in part by an association of legume farmers and confirms that simply changing what they eat can help diabetics reduce some of their symptoms, as well as lower their risk of heart disease — in as little as a few months. MORE: Guide: The 31 Healthiest Foods of All Time (With Recipes) Starting in 2010, researchers in Toronto, Canada, enrolled 121 patients with Type II diabetes and tested their blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and more. Roughly half of the study participants were randomly selected to add a cup of legumes per day to their diet. The other half were told to try to eat more whole-wheat products. After three months, the patients were tested again on the same measures. Both the legume-eaters and the whole-wheat-eaters saw a reduction in their hemoglobin A1c values — a marker of average blood sugar, for a period of several weeks. But that reduction was slightly larger among the legume group than among the whole-what group: 0.5% compared to 0.3%. And while those changes may seem small, the study authors say that drops of this magnitude are “therapeutically meaningful,” and can lead to fewer diabetic symptoms as well as lower doses of medication to control blood sugar levels. The legume-eaters also achieved modest reductions in body weight relative to the wheat group, losing an average of 5.9 lbs compared to 4.4 lbs, as well as drops in total choles Continue reading >>

Everyday Foods You Should Avoid With Type 2 Diabetes

Everyday Foods You Should Avoid With Type 2 Diabetes

One of my least favorite things is telling my patients what not to eat. I like to focus on the positives and educate my patients about the plethora of good foods that you can eat. But, from time to time, I find that some people are grateful when they are told that certain foods are "off limits." The types of foods that I may deem "off limits" might surprise you because what folks think is healthy may not always be the best choice. Some of these foods are obvious because they contain added sugars - for instance, candies, cookies, soda, etc. Other foods of which you should avoid are foods rich in carbohydrate and/or sugar with limited fiber, and those that are lacking in nutrition (vitamins and minerals). Here are some examples: Whole Wheat Bagels Although this type of bagel is whole wheat, that doesn't mean it has fewer carbohydrates than it's white counterpart. One bagel is equivalent to eating about 4-6 slices of bread, which means it is very carbohydrate dense and can raise blood sugars. Bagels are also lacking in filling fiber and protein. Therefore, you are likely to be hungry a few hours after eating one which can negatively impact your blood sugars and weight. To make this a healthier choice, decide to eat 1/2 (scooped out) and top it will a few scrambled egg whites and a vegetable of your choice. My favorite combination is 3 egg whites with 1/3 avocado, and 1/2 cup spinach - this adds protein, fiber, and healthy fat. Some studies suggest a larger, higher protein, higher fat breakfast may help to reduce HgbA1c. Whole Wheat Pretzels Whole wheat pretzels may seem like a good choice because they are whole wheat, but pretzels are rich in sodium and lack nutritional value. One serving of honey wheat pretzels will cost you ~110 calories, 1 g fat, 20 0mg sodium, 24 g car Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Snacks

Diabetes And Snacks

Worried you're headed for diabetes? If you're carrying extra pounds, you're probably already somewhat insulin resistant, says Beth Reardon, director of nutrition at Duke University's Duke Integrative Medicine. That means your body isn't responding optimally to insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that allows glucose (sugar) from food to stay at a healthy level in the blood. Though changing your overall eating style is the best way to improve your blood sugar, snack time often trips up otherwise conscientious eaters who find themselves mindlessly grabbing chips and doughnuts. In general, choose more plants and whole grains, and fewer simple starches and processed foods -- even for snacks. Reardon's choices for five snack foods that won't undermine the rest of your diet: Diabetes-Friendly Snack: Kale Chips They're so good you can't eat just one -- but you don't have to worry about holding back. Dark leafy greens in general provide dozens of flavonoids, substances that have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits. And kale, a cabbage kin, is often called the world's healthiest vegetable, loaded with vitamin A, vitamin C, and almost 50 different flavonoid compounds. To make kale chips, tear kale into bite-sized pieces. Carefully wash and dry. Drizzle with a little olive oil and sea salt, then bake at 350 degrees until the edges start to brown, about 10 to 15 minutes. You're basically dehydrating the kale -- a process that works for many other vegetables, Reardon says. The drizzle of oil that adds crispness and a little flavor is much less than in a similar batch of fried potatoes. You can also bake spinach chips, sweet potato chips, carrot chips, or taro chips. Diabetes-Friendly Snack: Pumpkin Seeds Crunchy pumpkin seeds (also known as pepitas) are high in zinc, magne Continue reading >>

Classic Hummus

Classic Hummus

Share: Email: Print: You can make your own hummus for a snack at home with a few simple ingredients. Prep Time: 5 minutes This Recipe Serves 6 Ingredients 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained 3 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons olive oil 3-4 garlic cloves, chopped Juice of 1 large lemon Kosher salt, to taste Freshly ground black pepper Instructions In a food processor or blender combine all ingredients until smooth, but thick. Add water if necessary to produce a smooth hummus. Store covered for up to 5 days. Featured Cookbook by Robyn Webb, MS This month’s featured recipes will give you a taste of The Diabetes Comfort Food Cookbook by Robyn Webb. Sprinkled with helpful tips and time-saving advice, this cookbook makes classic comfort foods more diabetes-friendly and easy to prepare. Do you often eat so quickly that you end up feeling stuffed? Eating more mindfully could help. It’s important to make sure you are choosing nutritious, healthy foods when you decide to snack. Continue reading >>

50 Best Foods For Diabetes

50 Best Foods For Diabetes

For most of us, dialing back on sugar and simple carbs is an effective way to fast-track weight loss. But for those living with diabetes, it can be a matter of life and death. Diabetics are two to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke, according to the American Heart Association. And for those who don’t properly control their condition, the odds of health issues—which range from cardiovascular trouble to nerve damage and kidney disease—increases exponentially. Luckily there are plenty of delicious foods that are compatible with diabetes. We tapped registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators for their top food picks that are low-carb and low-sugar, but still high in flavor. These superfoods will keep your blood sugar in check without skimping on flavor. Bonus: Most of these foods are also packed with essential vitamins and antioxidants to fight off inflammation and keep your energy levels high. While you’re stocking up your grocery cart with these staples, be sure to avoid the 75 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet. This nutty, trendy whole grain is a good source of fiber and protein, making it a smart pick for a diabetes diet, Sarah Koszyk, RDN tells us. “With the fiber and protein combination found in quinoa, you’ll feel fuller and have better blood sugar control. Protein also helps with the uptake of carbohydrates so the body can process them more easily. I suggest enjoying quinoa in a salad or casserole.” Elizabeth Snyder, RD, CDE says you can still eat carbs if you’re diabetic. You just have to watch out for portion sizes: “The trouble [with eating carbs as a diabetic] lies in eating more carbohydrates than we need, as the body will choose to store any extra energ Continue reading >>

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