diabetestalk.net

Is Honey Safe For Diabetics?

Is Honey Bad For Diabetes?

Is Honey Bad For Diabetes?

Tina M. St. John runs a health communications and consulting firm. She is also an author and editor, and was formerly a senior medical officer with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. St. John holds an M.D. from Emory University School of Medicine. Honey may be considered an occasional treat on a diabetic diet.Photo Credit: Jupiterimages/Creatas/Getty Images Honey is not completely forbidden to those on a diabetes nutrition plan. Honey contains a high concentration of sugars and more calories per teaspoon than table sugar. Small amounts of honey are permitted on a diabetic diet, although you need to monitor the total carbohydrates in your nutrition plan to be sure you do not exceed your daily target. Avoid consuming a large amount of honey to prevent a steep rise in your blood sugar level. Honey contains the sugars glucose and fructose. Fructose predominates in most honey varieties; the higher the fructose concentration, the sweeter the honey tastes. A tablespoon of honey contains approximately 17.3 g of sugars. Because glucose and fructose are single sugar molecules, they are directly absorbed from your small intestine. The rapid absorption of the sugars in honey may cause an increase in your blood glucose level. You can dampen this effect by eating food that contains protein, fiber or fat when you consume honey. Many people are surprised to learn that honey contains more calories than table sugar. A tablespoon of honey contains 64 calories compared to 47 calories for a tablespoon of granulated sugar. Although honey has more calories than table sugar, you may use less of it in your tea or coffee because it is slightly sweeter than table sugar. Frequent consumption of honey can contribute to weight gain, which may exacerbate your diabetes. Limiting you Continue reading >>

Honey & Lemon | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Honey & Lemon | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Not very well at the moment guys, have a really bad cough that is keeping me and my other half awake at night, causing arguments between us, my back and chest aches and I'm missing time off work. Obviously, cough medicine isn't meant to be used by diabetics because of the glucose but is honey and lemon okay? If I put a tablespoon of each in with some hot water? Something has to give, I've had it for over a week now So sorry to hear that you are unwell, do you think your GP would give you some antibiotics..... I would drink hot water and lemon , not sure about the honey , I would take hot infussed ginger as well.. Sending you hugs to get well soon....Kat x The more I hear about NHS advice, the more gobsmacked I become. This isn't a criticism of you, Indiana, but how on earth does a water soluble substance "line the throat"? Two more swallows and it will be gone. At best a residue will be left round your teeth, leading to decay. I have no experience of T1, but, from what I have read on here over the past year, it wouldn't surprise me if you could measure your honey and bolus for it. If so, do have a really big spoonful on me. Sounds like you need a treat! Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Is honey bad for diabetics? I hear this question a lot. And for good reasons! Diabetics are advised a low-sugar diet. Its simple science actually — the less sugar you put into your body, the more stable your blood sugar levels. And since honey is nature’s sweetener, by default, many diabetics avoid it. But is raw, organic, all-natural honey actually bad for diabetics? Can diabetics eat honey, if they take extreme care to purchase only the highest quality raw honey? Let’s find out. Is Honey Bad for Diabetics? The answer to that question is – it depends. On what, you ask? On what kind of honey you eat, if it’s organic and all-natural or not, and how much of it you add to your diet. Let’s first understand how honey differs from sugar. 100 grams of honey contains about 82% sugar by weight, while 100gm of sugar contains 99.9% sugar. While pure honey has a glycemic index of 58, sugar’s glycemic index is 60. But where honey trumps over sugar is in its vitamin and mineral content. It contains nearly 200 different substances, especially antioxidants, which may protect against several diseases. Additionally, honey and sugar have different impacts on blood sugar levels. A study conducted at Dubai Specialized Medical Center and Medical Research Laboratories proved that natural honey lowers plasma glucose, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and blood lipids in healthy, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic subjects. Researchers found that while 75g of honey did raise blood sugar and insulin levels in the first two hours, 75g of pure glucose raised them both significantly more. The initial blood sugar spike measured at 30 minutes was greater from honey than from glucose. However, blood sugar levels in the honey group then dropped lower than sugar, and remained lower for the next Continue reading >>

How Safe Is It For Diabetics To Eat Honey?

How Safe Is It For Diabetics To Eat Honey?

Honey goes by the name of natures sweetener, and our ancestors have not only been consuming it but using it for versatile medicinal purposes as well, practically since the dawn of time. So since its both sweet-tasting and healthy, surely we should all try to include it into our daily diets right? Well, as healthy as it is, honey is still basically sugar, and we are all aware of the consequences of eating too much sugar, even if its the natural kind. So, the question remains is honey safe to eat or not? Especially when it comes to those with diabetes. And since this question is anything but simple, let us delve into the topic in more detail before making a final conclusion, shall we? We all learned back in school that honey is the product from the nectar of flowers, thanks to the arduous work of the bees. But not many are aware that honeys nutritional properties depend on the nectar which is available around the beehive. Obviously, when compared to regular sugar, honey takes the cake by being much healthier and nutritious. It has many more vitamins and minerals which sugar lacks. Furthermore, honey is only 82% sugar, while sugar is (no shocker) 99.9% sugar. Which, naturally, makes honey less caloric and a far better alternative for sweetening things up! It is also rather high in antioxidants which can stop and treat a vast number of diseases. Its glycemic index , however, is rather unpredictable as it varies from variety to variety. Effects on Insulin and Blood Sugar: Honey versus Sugar The impact which the consumption of honey has on ones blood glucose levels is slightly better than that of sugar. However, the keyword here isslightly. A number of studies conducted on patients with Type II diabetes have concluded that honey indeed has a smaller impact on ones sugar leve Continue reading >>

How Does Honey Help Diabetics?

How Does Honey Help Diabetics?

Honey is popular as a natural sweetener. But, did you know that it can help keep diabetes in control? Given that anything ‘sweet’ is out of bounds for diabetics, this sounds impossible, right? Just because honey is sweet to taste, it does not mean that honey and sugar act in the same fashion. The former is actually good for diabetes. Curious? Read on to know how can diabetics eat honey. Diabetes – A Brief Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar levels. It is a disease where your body fails to either produce insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows the cells to use glucose from the food as energy. When this glucose can no longer reach the cells, it stays in your blood, thus raising the blood sugar levels. The ingested sugars and starches cannot be used up as energy, and hence are eliminated through urine (1). Signs And Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Extreme thirst or hunger Weight loss Fatigue Numbness Infection Types Of Diabetes There are two types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t produce any insulin. On the other hand, people who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin or their cells do not use it properly. As a result, type 2 diabetes patients tend to be overweight and obese due to the high insulin levels. Their bodies are unable to channel glucose into the muscle cells, and end up converting glucose into fat and cholesterol instead. Can Diabetics Eat Honey? is honey good for diabetics? Well, many people are of the opinion that honey should not be consumed by people who have diabetes. But, is it true? Let’s find out. What makes honey better than refined sugar for diabetes? People ar Continue reading >>

Cinnamon & Honey | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Cinnamon & Honey | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am a type 2 Diabetic and my levels have been all over the place and rising. I have spoken with my DN and all the time I get is increase your tablets 3 Glicazde + 2 Metformin a day. I have asked many questions, but same old bloody story eat starchy foods and loose weight. Have lost 1.5 stone in 12 months and increased exercise (14STONE 7 NOW), but still having high BS (10 - 15). Have started reducing carbs, against my DN instructions........... slapped wrists I came across a website called www.diabetesselfmanagement.com, which had quite a few threads about the use of Cinnamon & Honey, which has significantly lowered BS with many of the forum's personnel significantly reducing the amount of medication that they take. I was wondering if anybody on the forum had tried or are using Cinnamon & Honey as part of their daily program. The site looks to be run by a qualified Diabetes Nurse and the advice seems very genuine, sorry not plugging the site, but would like to do something else rather than rattle with tablets, hate taking tablets. I sprinkle about half a teaspoon of cinnamon on my breakfast. I seem to be doing ok with this. Not tried honey, would have thought it had too many carbs to do any good. As you may read in many threads on this forum I would suggest you ignore your DN and keep the carbs down; starchy carbs in practice can be highly refined and quickly turned to glucose. If you haven't already got a meter then do obtain one and see what affects you. I've heard that cinnamon may help but I would avoid honey as it's just sugar in another form. See how it affects you with the meter. I have cinnamon several times a day sprinkled on joghurt as I kn Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why Honey Should Not Be Banned In Diabetic Diet

3 Reasons Why Honey Should Not Be Banned In Diabetic Diet

The diabetic diet is strictly controlled in terms of sugar and mineral compounds intake. Hence it's not surprising that "whether honey is allowed for diabetic patients" is a frequently asked question for Benefits of Honey. Diabetes is a deficiency of the pancreas, whereby insulin is not produced sufficiently or utilised properly. It's basically a disorder of metabolism, primarily that of carbohydrates. The ingested sugars and starches cannot be deployed, and hence are eliminated in the urine. Symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, extreme thirst or hunger, weight loss, fatigue, numbness, and infections. There are 2 types of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't produce any insulin, whereas, people with type 2 diabetes either don't produce enough insulin or their cells resist the insulin, and they tend to be overweight, because the high insulin levels, unable to channel glucose into muscle cells, convert glucose into fat and cholesterol instead. This results not only in obesity, but also very often heart disease, poor blood circulation in the legs and eye diseases. While type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injections, which help glucose get into the body cells and maintain blood glucose control, type 2 diabetics commonly use glucose-lowering drugs. Most diabetics are type 2 and are usually in their 40s. 1. Not All Sweeteners are Made Equal You get (99 per cent of the time) a "no-no" answer when you ask doctors if honey is allowed for diabetics. With appropriate control, many diabetics and pre-diabetes (people with blood glucose levels higher than normal person but not high enough to be considered diabetic) are still able to safely enjoy natural honey (Journal of Medicinal Food, September 2007, 10(3): 473-478). Before incorporating honey into their Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

I have diabetes, and I'm wondering if I can substitute honey for sugar in my diet? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Generally, there's no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level. Honey is sweeter than granulated sugar, so you might use a smaller amount of honey for sugar in some recipes. But honey actually has slightly more carbohydrates and more calories per teaspoon than does granulated sugar — so any calories and carbohydrates you save will be minimal. If you prefer the taste of honey, go ahead and use it — but only in moderation. Be sure to count the carbohydrates in honey as part of your diabetes eating plan. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can a fat person eat honey? Can diabetics eat honey? Isn’t the glycemic index too high? Honey is sweet. Really sweet. Even sweeter than sugar. So how come there are people saying that they eat honey even if they have Type 2 Diabetes? All doctors say we should not consume sweet food if we have this condition, and of course, if we are overweight. Yet, clinical studies and practice say it’s good. The mystery lies in the type of the sugar. There are good sugar, bad sugar, and even toxic sugar. To understand this we will begin from the beginning. Food contains carbohydrates. There are all sorts of diets, with carbs, without carbs… Some people use something that works, others use something else and they work too. And some other people cannot find anything to work at all. Perhaps they miss the holistic approach and forget that food is not the only important thing in someone’s life. But that’s another story, in a different post. What’s all the fuss with carbohydrates? Scientists say: food contains carbohydrates. They can be simple or complex. The simple ones contain one or a few sugars, and the complex ones contain many many sugars. In order to digest and assimilate them, our body breaks all of them into simple sugars. After we eat, our digestive system breaks down the carbohydrates, meaning that it turns them into simple sugars, (monosaccharide) so they can be absorbed into the bloodstream. The speed of them entering the blood, leads to a term called glycemic index (GI). When we eat food that contains lots of simple carbs, they don’t need to be digested anymore and enter the blood immediately. We say they have a high GI. When our digestive system takes more time to digest them and the sugars enter the blood slower, we say these are carbs with slow GI. Very simpli Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Those with diabetes may feel like they are doomed to never again taste chocolate, or spoil themselves with a sweet dessert after a meal. The good news is, with a controlled diet, diabetics can still enjoy sweet things… as long as they are careful. Why does sugar affect diabetics? First of all, let's dispel the common myth that eating a lot of sugar can give you diabetes. This is well ‘known’ by most people. In fact, eating sugar has nothing to do with developing Type 1 diabetes. Genetics and other factors trigger the onset of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is slightly more complicated, with being overweight the biggest contributing factor. Of course a high intake of sugar adds to obesity, which can lead to diabetes, but the sugar itself is not directly responsible. Diabetes occurs when glucose levels in the blood are too high. This is a problem because most of the food we eat is turned into glucose for our body to burn as energy. The pancreas produces a hormone called insulin to help this transition from glucose to energy. In diabetics, the body either doesn’t produce insulin at all (Type 1), or can’t regulate the amount it produces (Type 2). Difference between honey and sugar When it comes to carbohydrates, there’s really not much difference between honey and sugar. However, this doesn’t tell the full story. Sugar is basically 100% sucrose, and has no nutritional value whatsoever. Honey on the other hand, contains many different vitamins and minerals, including zinc, iron, magnesium and potassium. Because of this, honey is sweeter than sugar, and so less is needed when cooking. Sugar is made up of fructose and glucose, two molecules which are bonded together to form sucrose. Our body needs to break this sucrose down before turning it into energy, but when i Continue reading >>

4 Powerful Ways To Use Honey For Diabetes

4 Powerful Ways To Use Honey For Diabetes

Diabetes is a complex metabolism disorder which is diagnosed in the majority of people these days. The present article will guide you through the topic of honey for diabetes. It will provide you insight about how you can use honey to cure diabetes. In this condition, the body is unable to use the high levels of sugar or glucose present in the blood. This is mainly because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin which is required to convert the glucose into a source of energy. Diabetes can be a life-threatening disease and it can affect the entire body and impact the quality of life. Although there is no cure for diabetes yet one can live a healthy life by managing the condition effectively by following a right diet. In matters of diabetes, the first thing an endocrinologist suggests is to eliminate the intake of sugars from the diet. Yet, honey, a natural sweetener alternative to sugar is proven to be beneficial for diabetics. Although many studies dont suggest honey for curing diabetes as honey contains more carbohydrates and is sweeter than sugar. Whereas some researchers at the Islamic Establishment for Education in the United Arab Emirates claim that consuming honey can lower the glucose levels. So, honey and diabetes are closely associated with treating diabetes. After discussing the brief about diabetes now lets discuss can diabetics eat honey or not. Honey possesses many medicinal benefits and is a rich source of many vital vitamins and minerals, unlike sugars which are only empty calories. As per clinical trials in diabetics honey requires lower levels of insulin relatively to the regular sugar. It is even noticed that honey does not raise the blood sugar levels instantly like regular sugar does as honey has lower glycemic index. It is also a must to menti Continue reading >>

Can I Have Honey | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Can I Have Honey | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am type 2 diabetic can I have honey or is it off the list. Honey contains sugar but it depends how much you have and how it affects you. The usual advice is to try it once, test before, test 2 hours afterwards and decide based on your findings. Honey is around 82% carbohydrates, nearly all of that is sugar. So it is generally inadvisable for T2s to eat honey, in the same was as it is inadvisable to eat sugar. For non-diabetics honey can be a better option than refined sugar because it isn't processed with loads of chemicals. Because of this it is generally classified as "healthy". However as with most other things "healthy" for non-diabetics doesn't necessarily mean "healthy" for diabetics. I am type 2 diabetic can I have honey or is it off the list. we are all different in our reactions to foods. I will page @daisy1 to give you the basics for people new to diabetes and self testing. Welcome to the forum. I am type 2 diabetic can I have honey or is it off the list. PS Answers to what foods and drinks will be affected by what medication you are on. I notice, from your profile, that you are a man, but havent mentioned any meds yet. May i ask if you are taking medication please? I am type 2 diabetic can I have honey or is it off the list. My husband, upon going for a pre op, had a blood glucose of 19. They asked if he was diabetic, which he isn't. When he came home and told me, I tested his blood and it had gone down to 17. Two hours later it was back down to 5.6. We realised upon testing the next morning that it was the spoonful of honey he put on his porridge because it was normal beforehand, but spiked to 20 within an hour of eating. He no longer ha Continue reading >>

A Taste Of Honey

A Taste Of Honey

I am a diabetic. Can I eat a limited amount of honey when it is called for in recipes? — Jennean, Oregon Yes, absolutely. Cautious consumption of natural unprocessed honey, when factored into your total caloric requirement, will not raise your blood sugar levels. In fact, in some studies, honey has been linked with reduced weight and an improved blood lipid profile (a measurement of fats in your blood). It also has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, fructose is the main sweetener in honey, and eating more than 50 grams of fructose a day can increase your blood sugar levels and result in an unfavorable lipid profile that is bad for your health. This is especially true for high-fructose corn syrup. So, you should first determine your daily caloric requirement. There are many Web-based calorie calculators that you can use to do this, including My Calorie Counter. Then, factor your honey intake into your total daily caloric requirement. One tablespoon of honey has 64 calories and contains 8.1 grams of fructose. Finally, avoid food items that contain high-fructose corn syrup. Learn more in the Everyday Health Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Honey?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Honey?

People with diabetes are often told they should not eat sweets and other foods that contain sugar because they may cause a spike in blood sugar levels. So, could honey be a healthful alternative to sugar-filled sweets and snacks? Blood sugar (glucose) levels are the amounts of sugar found in the blood. Sugar is the body's primary source of energy. Insulin is secreted from the pancreas to maintain blood sugar. The bodies of people with diabetes do not produce enough insulin or use it correctly. Contents of this article: What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates, which are broken down into sugar provide the body with most of its needed energy. Carbohydrates make up half of recommended daily caloric intake. Carbohydrates are present in most foods, including: fruits vegetables milk grains beans honey white sugar brown sugar candy desserts The amount and type of carbohydrates consumed affect blood sugar levels. To keep their blood sugar at a safe level, people with diabetes should limit their total carbohydrate intake to between 45 grams (g) and 60 g per meal or less. As such, it is important to choose healthful, non-processed, high-fiber carbohydrates and control portion sizes. What is honey? Raw honey starts out as flower nectar. After being collected by bees, nectar naturally breaks down into simple sugars and is stored in honeycombs. The honeycombs trigger the nectar to evaporate, which creates a thick, sweet liquid known as honey. Honey, like other sugars, is a condensed source of carbohydrates. One tablespoon of honey contains at least 17 g of carbohydrates. While this amount may seem small, it adds up pretty quickly depending on how many carbohydrates a person consumes at a meal sitting. While honey is made up of sugar, it also contains vitamins, minerals, and antioxidant Continue reading >>

Raw Honey

Raw Honey

by Angela Ysseldyk, Nutritionist and Beekeeper's Daughter A common question I get is whether or not diabetics can consume honey. It has long been thought that honey should be severely limited (along with most sugars) by diabetics. But the science strongly indicates that this is not the case. Below I cover three studies on raw honey in diabetics, all of which show positive health benefits for those who consume honey. In the first study, scientists set out to investigate the effect of consuming honey with one of two common diabetes drugs - metformin or glibenclamide. Diabetic rats were randomized into six groups and administered distilled water, honey, glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin or metformin and honey for four weeks. What the scientists found was that honey significantly increased insulin, decreased hyperglycemia and fructosamine (fructosamine are used to identify blood glucose concentration over time). Although the two drugs alone significantly reduced hyperglycemia, when they were combined with honey they produced significantly much lower blood glucose as compared to the drugs alone. Similarly, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly lower fructosamine levels whereas glibenclamide or metformin alone did not decrease fructosamine. Even more interesting was that glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, triglycerides (blood fats), and VLDL cholesterol (VLDL cholesterol is considered a type of "bad" cholesterol because elevated levels are associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease). Wow. It seems counterintuitive that honey actually lowers blood sugar levels. But the science clearly shows that it does. And furthermore, it appe Continue reading >>

More in diabetes