diabetestalk.net

Is Honey Mustard Bad For Diabetics

Can A Diabetic Eat Honey?

Can A Diabetic Eat Honey?

Diabetics used to be told that they shouldn't eat any sugar, sweets or desserts. However, it is not the amount of sugar you eat that matters the most, but your total carbohydrate intake, according to the American Diabetes Association. Carbohydrates are not only found in sugar, such as in honey, maple syrup, white sugar, brown sugar and agave syrup, but are also present in large quantities in grains, starchy vegetables and fruits. You should restrict your carbohydrate intake to 45 g to 60 g per meal for best blood sugar control, according to the American Diabetes Association. Video of the Day Honey, like all other sugar, is a concentrated source of carbohydrates. A tablespoon of honey provides 17.3 g of carbohydrates, while a teaspoon has 5.8 g of carbohydrates, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database. Although these amounts may appear small, it can add up quickly depending on how much you use at one time. It is a good idea to track your carbohydrate intake. Write down the food you eat, with the corresponding serving size, and estimate the carbohydrate content of each of these foods using food labels or food composition tables. Add it up and make sure that each of your meals provide no more than 45 g to 60 g of carbohydrates. If honey can fit within your carbohydrate budget, your blood sugar control should not be impaired. Honey is often considered a healthy sweetener when compared to white sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. Although it is more natural and less processed, it still contains about the same amount of sugar as any other type of nutritive sweeteners. For example, 1 tsp. of granulated sugar has 4.8 g of carbohydrates, 1 tsp. of brown sugar has 4.5 g of carbohydrates, 1 tsp. of corn syrup has 5.6 g of carbohydrates and 1 tsp. of maple syrup has 4.5 g o Continue reading >>

Where Sugar Lurks

Where Sugar Lurks

Mention the word “sugar” to someone who has diabetes, and chances are he’ll tell you that he either avoids it like the plague or at least makes some effort to limit his intake. Years ago, nutrition recommendations for people with diabetes were essentially to avoid sugar as much as possible, based on the thinking that sugar would send blood glucose levels through the roof. Well, that notion was pretty much disproven, thanks to research that showed that sugar doesn’t act a whole lot differently than many other types of carbohydrate foods (like bread) when it comes to blood glucose control. The consensus became that it’s more the amount of carbohydrate than the type of carbohydrate that has the most impact on blood glucose. And with that, guidelines were changed, guardedly stating that sugar, in moderation, could be part of a diabetes eating plan provided that it was used in place of other carbohydrate foods. As a dietitian, I spent a lot of time talking to my patients about how to fit sugar or sugary foods into a meal plan and was often met with skepticism and doubt. “Me, eat sugar?” tended to be the response. I also encountered (and still do) people who mistakenly believe that eating something sweet “caused” them to get diabetes. Diabetes aside, we know that sugar isn’t exactly a paragon of nutrition. Most dietitians I know don’t advise their patients to eat more sugar. In fact, Americans, as a whole, tend to overdo it on the sugar: We tend to consume, on average, 22 teaspoons of sugar every day. That adds up to 350 calories. Much of the sugar that Americans take in comes from sugar-sweetened drinks, by the way. One teaspoon of sugar contains 4 grams of carbohydrate and 16 calories Downsides of sugar Sugar is sweet but its effects on health, well, n Continue reading >>

Low Carb Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

Low Carb Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

D.D. Family T2 for a few years-diet, exercise, Metformin I got this off allrecipes.com but I made it low-carb. I first made the regular dressing. It was delicious, but too high in carbs. The second time I doubled the recipe and substituted agave syrup for most of the honey. It still is really good, and the little bit of honey gives it the honey flavor that it needs without having all that stuff that makes your blood sugar rise so fast Here is the unedited one so remember to substitute the agave. Also, I always use the low-fat mayo. In a small bowl, whisk together all ingredients. Pour atop salad and serve. (NOTE that this would be for a large salad or else you will really drown the salad in dressing) Check your ingredients to see if there are more carbs than you want. My rice wine vinegar says 5 grams per 1 Tablespoon, and the sesame oil says 1 gram per teaspoon. To me, this is not much, but YMMV. Make sure you use the real Asian sesame oil that comes in a little bottle, not the large bottle that is not Asian because that has a very different taste. It should really smell like sesame when you open it. I think the agave syrup has the same carbs as honey. I use honey mustard all the time and don't worry about the carbs. I think it is 2 D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 2 tbs of honey is 35 g of carbs. That is too much for me. Perhaps you could substitute a sugar free honey ([ame="Hollow "Tastes Like Honey" Sugar Free Honey Substitute 10 oz.: Amazon.com: Grocery[/ame]). Looked at the site for Nature's Hollow but it does not give the nutrional facts - what is it made of ? D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 Looked at the site for Nature's Hollow but it does not give the nutrional facts - what is it made of ? Xylitol, spring water, xantham gum, natural h Continue reading >>

Salad Dressing For Diabetics

Salad Dressing For Diabetics

If you have diabetes, choosing the right foods in the right amounts and eating them at the right time can become challenging and even overwhelming. Although salads are a healthy way to increase your vegetable intake, what you put on your salad can make the difference between a healthy meal and a high-calorie and fat-loaded meal. Salad dressings add a lot of flavor to salads, but it is important to know how to choose a healthy salad dressing to stay healthy with diabetes. Video of the Day To keep your blood sugar levels under control with diabetes, carbohydrate intake is your main concern. Mainly found in grains, sugar, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar and cause your blood sugar levels to rise after being absorbed. Although salad dressings usually provide few carbohydrates, commercially prepared salad dressings, especially low-fat and low-calorie versions, may contain added sugar. Some "light" salad dressings can contain up to 5 g of carbohydrates per tablespoon, which can quickly add up, depending on the amount you use. When choosing a salad dressing, have a look at the carbohydrate content and avoid the ones containing added sugar. Type of Fat The type of fat used to make a salad dressing have a big influence on how it impacts your blood cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk. Prioritize salad dressings made with monounsaturated fat-rich fats, because of their ability to lower LDL cholesterol levels. Olive oil, macadamia oil, avocado oil and canola oil are examples of oils rich in monounsaturated fats. Look at the label to know what type of fats are present in your salad dressing. The amount of salad dressing you drizzle on your salad is also an important factor to consider. Salad dressing are dense in calories and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

1 / 11 Use Portion Control Enhancing your food's flavors through condiments and spices is key to enjoying a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. But before you reach for the ketchup and mayo, know that some choices are a lot better for you than others. You'll also benefit from learning how to read nutrition labels and measuring servings carefully. "Most important is portion control," says Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes. "Condiments should be used to enhance the flavor of food and not serve as the main course." Here are the facts on the most popular condiments and spices to help you choose. Continue reading >>

Foods You Think Are Healthy But Aren T | Diabetic Connect

Foods You Think Are Healthy But Aren T | Diabetic Connect

No food is all or nothing even sugar can be okay to eat in small quantities. However, there are some common dishes many of us think are wholesome, but arent good for you in their typical serving sizes and with the typical ingredients. Here are 10 dishes many think are healthy but arent and how to modify them for better health. With the combination of croutons, heavy dressing, and loads of Parmesan cheese, even a small Caesar salad can deliver a whopping 470 calories with 40 grams of fat and more sodium than a bag of potato chips. Dont let the healthy label salad fool you. For a healthier option, get rid of those croutons, put less cheese on it and go for a lighter salad dressing. The unfortunate thing about taco salads is youre likely to add on a plethora of toppings from sour cream to Mexican blend shredded cheese to piles of guacamole that just arent good for you. Some sources say that a whole fast food taco salad can have 906 calories and 49 grams of fat. Consider foregoing the added cheese, taco sauce, crispy taco shell and guacamole and make a modified taco salad with the meat, beans and lettuce. A Cobb salad may be a lunch favorite, but our bodies certainly could do without it. Many Cobb salads come with supersized portions of bacon, hard-boiled eggs and blue cheese, not to mention dressing on top. The finished product is heaping amounts of fatty meats and cheeses and little lettuce and vegetables. You may want to omit the blue cheese and bacon and instead add more vegetables like peppers and cucumbers. You may think that fresh smoothies you get on your way to work may be jam-packed with nutrients. However, many of the most popular smoothies are filled with sherbet, ice cream, and fruit concentrates all high-sugar products with little to no nutritional value. Mak Continue reading >>

What Are The Free Foods For Diabetics?

What Are The Free Foods For Diabetics?

Are you trying to plan food chart for someone having diabetes? If you are, then your primary concern must be the level of carbohydrate intake that may happen due to having a particular nature of food. While doing such planning, you may have come across the term Free Food. What exactly are such foods? They are foods which have very less carbohydrate and also have fewer calories. There are usually two types of such free food. Let us know about those. There are two types of such foods. Let us see those types. Category 1: Though these types of foods are called free diabetic persons cannot have them in abundance. They have an amount of carbohydrate, but that will not affect the sugar level much. So, they can be taken in small proportion if wished. Foods that are included in this category have less than 5 grams of carbohydrate and less than 20 calories per serving. They must not be consumed more than three times daily. Pickles (sweet, gherkin, bread and butter) Rhubarb (fresh, unsweetened, or with sugar rub) Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Pretzels Pretzels have a healthy image, but a glance at the ingredients list reveals that their wholesome reputation is grossly undeserved. Nearly every brand is made from the same basic ingredients: white flour (wheat flour that’s been stripped of its nutrients and fiber), yeast, salt, and maybe some vegetable oil or corn syrup. It’s obvious from its subpar ingredient list that this popular snack is pretty much devoid of nutrition. Pretzels are baked, not fried like potato chips, which saves you a few calories, but the white, refined carbs do a number on your blood sugar and do little to satisfy your appetite. Skip the carb-fest and opt for a more balanced and filling snack that includes some protein to help steady your sugars. Great choices include a rice cake with reduced-fat cheese, a handful of pistachio nuts in the shell, or a nonfat Greek yogurt. Looking for tips on how to manage diabetes? Give these lifestyle changes a shot. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe

Diabetes-friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe

Diabetes-Friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe Diabetes-Friendly Lemony Salad Dressing Recipe *The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calorie a day is used for general nutrition advice. Instead of stressing out over ruining a healthy salad with an unhealthy dressing, make this diabetes-friendly salad dressing recipe to pour over those greens. It's also vegetarian and vegan. It's a simpledressing recipe with ingredients that have been found to be beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes. I love salads and eat them a lot. I even have salads for breakfast. I use this go-to lemony healthy salad dressing recipe most of the time. It's fast, easy, and flavorful. I can quickly mix it up in a cup and pour it over a large salad.SeeWhy This Salad Dressing Is a Healthy Choice, below, after the instructions to this recipe. Juice of 1/2 to 1 lemon, according to taste, including pulp 1 garlic clove (or more to taste) smashed with a garlic press (seeNote, below) In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the juice and pulp of 1/2 to 1 whole lemon, according to taste, 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, 1 smashed garlic clove, and salt and pepper to taste. Taste the salad dressing. If the taste is too strong, add a tablespoon of water. Repeat until you get the flavor you desire. Remember, you want it to be a bit strong since it will be poured over the greens and tossed Note:If you do not have a garlic press, you can chop up the garlic, sprinkle with a pinch of salt, and smash with a fork. To maximize the health properties of garlic, crush or smash it at room temperature and allow it to sit for 15 minutes. Try this recipe with lime juice, add a pinch of chili powder or a chili powder spice mixture. My favo Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Frustration...

Gestational Diabetes Frustration...

My dr wants me to keep my glucose level under 120 one hour after I eat a meal. It's basically taken me down to about 20-30 carbs per meal. My frustration is that I have eaten the same exact meal four days in a row....2x my sugar was good....2x it was bad. Anyone else experiencing this?!? @Nikiel 120 an hour after? Even with a high risk doctor and my educator... mine is supposed to be 120 or less... 2 hours after... I had the same issue, been battling the same thing. I have found several foods you can eat and even blogged about them. There is also a thread under "Complications" You may want to check some of the other threads as well. There are a ton here on GD. @Nikiel No way. 120 after 1 hour is off. It should be after *2* hours. That's what I thought! My dad has Type 2 diabetes and he thought the dr messed up. He told me it should be after 2 hours as well. I have an appt tomorrow, so I'm definitely following up on this! Thanks Ladies :) @Nikiel Hey girls! Nikiel, two friends of mine also had a 120 limit one hour after eating. I couldn't believe it! Mine is 130 on hour post-meal, so I have a little more leeway. The only advice I can give is that I know our body uses the sugar differently everyday. Unfortunately, that doesn't help your/our situation any. My breakfast and lunch has fluctuated a few times even though I also eat basically the same thing everyday. Although, I found that happened after my supper level was a little higher the night before. Might this be part of your problem? Sorry I can't help any more. I know it's frustrating! Hang in there! Not that much longer! On another note, do any of you carb counting girls know how many carbs are in fried chicken wings with sauce? My husband and I used to do wing night twice-three times a month. I haven't tried it sin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

I have diabetes, and I'm wondering if I can substitute honey for sugar in my diet? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Generally, there's no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level. Honey is sweeter than granulated sugar, so you might use a smaller amount of honey for sugar in some recipes. But honey actually has slightly more carbohydrates and more calories per teaspoon than does granulated sugar — so any calories and carbohydrates you save will be minimal. If you prefer the taste of honey, go ahead and use it — but only in moderation. Be sure to count the carbohydrates in honey as part of your diabetes eating plan. Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Honey?

You don't have to avoid this sweet nectar even if you have diabetes. Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Honey is a safer sweetener than sugar because it has a lower glycemic index. However, honey still contains carbohydrate, so it is important for diabetics to track the intake of honey just like sugar. Shes as sweet as Tupelo honey, a line from Van Morrisons song is one of many that refers to the sweet nectar that is honey. Some call honey a miracle food because of the many other properties it has besides just being a sweetener. Honey has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (the darker the honey, the more antioxidants), as well as trace minerals of B-vitamins and Vitamin C. And for centuries, honey has been used as an anti-microbial agent to treat cuts, wounds, acne, and other skin ailments. Honey is a sweetener , somewhat comparable to table sugar. Both honey and sugar contain carbohydrate. It is the arrangement of the carbohydrate molecules glucose and fructose that make sugar and honey a little different from each other, however. Honey has a lower glycemic index than sugar (55 compared to 65, respectively), so eating honey may result in a more modest increase in blood glucose than when consuming sugar. When counting carbohydrates, it is important to know that 1 tablespoon of honey is considered one serving of honey, or 15 grams of carbohydrate. It is also important to note that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the American Heart Association have both issued the recommendation to reduce intake of added sugars, which would include both sugar and honey. But reducing intake does n Continue reading >>

More in diabetes