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Is Grapes Good For Diabetics?

Type 2 Diabetes And Glycemic Response To Grapes Or Grape Products.

Type 2 Diabetes And Glycemic Response To Grapes Or Grape Products.

Abstract Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 7% of the population in the United States and is characterized by decreased disposal of glucose in peripheral tissues due to insulin resistance and overproduction of glucose by the liver, defects in pancreatic beta-cell function, and decreased beta-cell mass. Obesity, decreased physical exercise, and consumption of foods with a high glycemic index (GI) and load are major predisposing factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. The GI is used to evaluate the rise in blood glucose levels in response to food. The GI provides an indication of the quality of carbohydrate in a food. The glycemic load (GL) is used to provide information about the quantity of carbohydrates in a food and the insulin demand. Individuals with diabetes are advised to maintain a diet of low-GL foods, because low-GL diets improve diabetes symptoms. Grapes have a mean GI and GL in the low range. Little research has been performed with grapes and/or grape products to determine the glycemic response either alone or with a meal. Grapes and other fruits contain numerous polyphenols, including the stilbene resveratrol, the flavanol quercetin, catechins, and anthocyanins that have shown potential for reducing hyperglycemia, improving beta-cell function, and protecting against beta-cell loss. Therefore, with a low mean GI and GL, grapes or grape products may provide health benefits to type 2 diabetics. Continue reading >>

Grapes For Diabetes

Grapes For Diabetes

Grapes are an ancient fruit that have been with us since the dawn of mankind. The fruit originates from Western Asia and Central Europe. Various types of grapevines have traversed the whole world and have easily been assimilated into many civilizations’ diet due to the fruits sweet taste and incredible health benefits. Even the most practiced religion, Christianity has included the grape (wine) into their most sacred practices and has played a role in a myriad of biblical stories. The grape is currently cultivated on every continent on earth excluding Antarctica. Unfortunately only recently have scientists been researching the sweet berry for more health benefits other than the common ones that are present in most fruits. Grapes have a low glycemic index (GI), low calories (1 cup has 104), and a plethora of health benefits. While most diabetics still avoid any sugary fruits, many experts recommend you eat them regularly and in moderation. Grapes have an abundant amount of phytochemicals that contain antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. These can help reduce the risk cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cellular damage caused by free radicals. Numerous studies on the effects of grapes on diabetes have proved conclusive. The experiments have shown that the delicious fruit is exceptionally well at regulating blood sugar levels, lower triglyceride levels, LDL (bad) cholesterol, and increases insulin sensitivity. Recent research on a new phytonutrient called resveratrol which is mainly found in the skin of the grape may be linked to increased longevity. A new study has shown that in animals introduced regularly with this compound help activate proteins that promote optimal health and anti-aging properties. The resveratrol in red wine might be linked to the Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Red Grapes As A Diabetic?

Can I Eat Red Grapes As A Diabetic?

In the past, diabetics were advised to avoid fruit due to the sugar content, but modern diabetes diets allow fruit as a part of an overall healthy and balanced meal plan. Diabetics need to maintain strict control over blood sugar levels and try not to consume unhealthy foods that can lead to diabetes complications. Video of the Day A diabetes diet should focus on controlling diabetes symptoms as well as preventing complications common to the disease. For most diabetics, this means eating a high-fiber diet that is low in fat, especially saturated fat. Saturated fat can contribute to arterial plaques, a common complication for diabetics. Diabetics need to limit carbohydrates, especially sweet foods that raise blood sugar. Eating carbohydrates in moderation and along with something containing protein is a good way to keep blood sugar under control. In general, two to three handfuls of fruit a day should be fine for most diabetics and grapes can be included in this fruit allotment. Red Grapes and Carbohydrates For a diabetic, eating foods with a lot of carbohydrates can send blood sugar soaring. Fortunately, fiber, protein and fat can mitigate this response. In one method of diabetic dieting, the diabetic limits carbohydrates at each meal to a specific amount based on his own typical blood sugar responses and any medication and insulin he might be taking. According to the American Diabetes Association, most diabetics can start off with around 45 to 60 g of carbohydrates per meal and adjust as necessary. In 10 grapes, there are about 8.8 g of carbohydrates. About 0.4 g is fiber and 7.6 g is made up of sugars. Some diabetics use the glycemic index to decide what they should eat. The glycemic index indicates how fast and high blood sugar rises in response to a particular carbo Continue reading >>

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

People with type 2 diabetes know that they need to pay attention to their carbohydrate intake. Of the three main macronutrients in food — protein, fat, and carbohydrates — it's the carbohydrates that directly affect blood sugar levels, and this includes the carbohydrates in fruit. But a study published in August 2013 in the British Medical Journal looked at the association between fruit and type 2 diabetes and found that fruit can still be a crucial part of a good diabetes diet. The study, which followed nearly 190,000 people over a number of years, found that eating whole fruits — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — significantly reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, drinking more fruit juices actually increases the risk for diabetes. “If you have type 2 diabetes, you do need to watch your sugar," says Katie Barbera, RD, CDE, of Northwell Health Systems in New Hyde Park, New York. She explains that while both whole fruit and fruit juice have carbohydrates, a small piece of whole fruit is equal to about 4 ounces (oz) of fruit juice. So if you drink 12 oz of fruit juice, you could be getting more than you need. “And whole fruits have a lot of other advantages for a diabetes diet," Barbera adds. Understanding the Carbohydrates in Fruit Like vegetables and grains, fruits contain carbs. You need the fruits for a healthy diet, but with type 2 diabetes you also need to keep track of the carbs. Still, figuring out which fruits are best for diabetes is about more than counting carbs — it's also important to take into account the beneficial nutrients certain fruits provide. “Whole fruits are an excellent source of antioxidants," Barbera says. "They have a lot of fiber, so they make you feel fuller and satisfy your hunger. They also add Continue reading >>

My Father Has Diabetes – Can He Eat Grapes?

My Father Has Diabetes – Can He Eat Grapes?

My father was recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes). He has always loved grapes, but my mother, who is in charge of his diet, now claims he can't eat them. Is this correct? Are they bad for his diabetes? Everyone with diabetes should follow a low-fat, high-fibre diet including plenty of green vegetables. Until fairly recently, sugar was banned altogether, and fruit was also forbidden because it contains a lot of sugar. Nowadays, however, we know that fat is probably even more harmful than sugar. Fats in the blood cause hardening of the arteries, which people with diabetes are prone to anyway. It is therefore especially important for people with diabetes to avoid eating too much fatty foods. To return to your question, as a general rule, people with diabetes should not eat more than two or three pieces of fruit a day. One portion of fruit can be measured as the amount you can hold easily in one hand. In other words, your father can eat two or three handfuls of fruit a day – and some of this amount – or all of it – can be grapes. Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Other Qs & As Last updated 03.04.2011 Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Are Grapes And/or Grape Juice Bad For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

Are Grapes And/or Grape Juice Bad For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

A: No, grapes and grape juice are not “bad” for people with diabetes. Grapes are actually rich in phytonutrients, nutrients that are thought to play a role in disease prevention, cognitive function and immunity. However, it’s important to keep in mind that all fruit and fruit juices contain carbohydrate. People with diabetes need to control their carbohydrate intake. A “serving” of grapes is about 17; a serving of grape juice is 1/3 of a cup. Depending on your carbohydrate goals for your meals and snacks, you should be able to fit grapes and/or grape juice into your eating plan, but you’ll need to keep an eye on your portion. Also, it’s generally recommended that one eat whole fruit instead of drinking juice. Drinking juice is less satisfying than eating fruit, and some people find that it raises blood glucose levels rather quickly. Continue reading >>

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

High in soluble fiber, oats are slower to digest than processed carbs. Eat them and you’ll release glucose into the bloodstream more slowly, which will prevent spikes in your blood-sugar levels. In a 2012 study from Sweden’s Karolinska University, researchers found that eating four servings of whole grains daily reduced the risk for developing prediabetes by 30 percent. Other research shows that if you eat whole grains you experience less inflammation, which could lower the odds of your developing insulin resistance, heart disease, and high blood pressure. These science-backed strategies can work to reverse diabetes. This sweet seasoning contains a compound called hydroxychalcone, which may stimulate insulin receptors on cells and, in turn, improve your body’s ability to absorb blood sugar. Researchers from the University of California-Davis recently reviewed eight different studies on cinnamon and reported that about half to one teaspoon a day lowered fasting blood sugar levels by an average of nine points among people with diabetes. Sprinkle the fragrant spice onto oatmeal or add a dash to a cup of coffee. These myths about diabetes could be damaging your health. From Merrill Lynch Eating more whole fruits, particularly grapes, blueberries, and apples, was significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a Harvard study published in the British Medical Journal in 2013. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23 percent when compared to those who ate less than one serving per month. Eating the whole fruit seems to be key, though; researchers found that fruit juice drinkers faced as much as a 21 percent increased risk of developing diabetes. Make sure to Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes And Apples Linked To Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes And Apples Linked To Lower Risk Of Diabetes

A large cohort study involving researchers from the US, UK and SIngapore, which focused on individual fruit consumption and risk of diabetes, reveals that certain fruits - but not juices - may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in adults. The study, published in BMJ, pulled data from three studies: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS 1984-2008), the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II 1991-2009) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS 1986-2008). In total, there were 187,382 participants, both men and women, who took part in the study, and participants who had diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer at the start were not included. The researchers used food frequency questionnaires every 4 years in order to analyze the participants' diet, and ten fruits were used in the study: Grapes or raisins Peaches, plums or apricots Prunes Cantaloupe Apples or pears Oranges Grapefruit Strawberries Additionally, fruit juice, such as apple, orange and grapefruit juice, was included. Over the course of the study, 6.5% of the participants developed diabetes, but the researchers found that consuming three servings per week of blueberries, grapes, raisins, apples or pears reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 7%. However, the results also showed that the greater amount of fruit juice an individual drank, the more their risk for type 2 diabetes increased. In general, substituting fruit juice with whole fruits decreased this risk, but strawberries and cantaloupe were the exception to this finding. The researchers write in the study: Individual fruits might not be equally associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in that fruits have highly variable contents of fibre, antioxidants, other nutrients, and phytochemicals that jointly may influence the risk." They add that their results support Continue reading >>

Are Grapes A Good Choice For A Diabetic Diet?

Are Grapes A Good Choice For A Diabetic Diet?

People with diabetes аnd thоѕе аt risk оftеn avoid fruits bесаuѕе оf thе sugar content. Thiѕ iѕ a myth thаt I’d likе tо debunk. Grapes аrе асtuаllу a great choice fоr people with diabetes. Contrary tо popular belief, grapes don’t tеnd tо highly elevate blood sugar, nоr dо thеу highly increase insulin levels. Sinсе high insulin levels саuѕе insulin resistance, choosing foods with a lower insulin response rate, likе grapes, саn prevent thе development оf thе insulin resistance characteristic in Type 2 diabetes. In June of 2015, it was discovered that I had type 2 diabetes, By the end of the month, I was given a prescription for Metformin, I stated the ADA diet and followed it completely for several weeks but was unable to get my blood sugar below 140, With no results to how for my hard work, I panicked and called my doctor, His response? Deal with it. I began to feel that something wasn’t right and do my own research and found Control Your Blood Sugar Level. The good news is that sticking to the plan can help people feel healthy and avoid diabetes. Continue reading >>

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

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