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Is Grand Nut Good For Diabetes

Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts?

Peanuts are a popular American snack food, and if you have diabetes you may wonder if you can also enjoy this nutritious favorite. While concerns about the impact of nuts on your weight and blood sugars may stop you in your tracks, there is good news. Peanuts, a groundnut from the legume family, and other tree nuts are linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, a common complication of diabetes. In addition, peanuts have properties that can actually help with appetite control and weight management, and peanuts in moderation do not worsen blood glucose control. Video of the Day A handful of nuts -- about 1 ounce -- contains 160 calories and has the same amount of protein as an ounce of meat or chicken, while also providing 2 grams of fiber and only 5 grams of carbohydrates. Peanuts have a glycemic index of 13 and a glycemic load of 1 -- both very low -- which means the carbohydrates in peanuts trigger less of a blood sugar spike compared to other foods with the same amount of carbohydrates. Peanuts are also nutrient-rich, as they contain heart healthy unsaturated fats, and are a good source of vitamin E, folate, niacin and the minerals phosphorus, magnesium, manganese and copper. Peanuts are also rich in phytochemicals -- substances with properties known to promote health and offer protection from chronic disease. According to the American Heart Association, adults with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke compared to adults without diabetes. Consuming peanuts may help lower this risk. Research featured in the May 2015 issue of "JAMA Internal Medicine" followed over 200,000 people for at least 5 years, comparing peanut and tree nut consumption in adults to death rates. Researchers found that U.S. study participants eating peanut Continue reading >>

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Consuming peanut butter or peanuts for breakfast can control blood sugar throughout most of the day, even after eating a high carbohydrate lunch… In addition to this “Second Meal Effect,” peanuts and peanut butter caused a significant reduction in the desire to eat for up to 12 hours and a significant increase in the secretion of the hormone PYY that promotes satiety and feelings of fullness. The study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. The principal investigator, Dr. Richard Mattes of Purdue University explained, “If you include peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast, you not only diminish the rise in blood sugar at breakfast but also again after lunch, helping to reduce blood sugar over a very large portion of the day.” During three phases of the study, 1.5 ounces of peanuts, 3 tablespoons of peanut butter, or no peanuts or peanut butter were consumed with a breakfast consisting of orange juice and cream of wheat followed by a lunch consisting of white bread and strawberry jam. Blood samples and appetite ratings were taken over a series of three hours following breakfast and again after lunch to assess glucose control and satiety; participants were also asked to keep a food diary for the remainder of the day after leaving the testing site. Results showed that peanut butter or peanuts included with breakfast promotes secretion of the appetite-suppressing hormone peptide YY (PYY). In addition, participants who consumed peanut butter or peanuts with breakfast reported a lower desire to eat for up to 8 to 12 hours later and maintained lower blood Continue reading >>

Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes? Effect On Disease Risk

Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes? Effect On Disease Risk

Peanuts are common in the average American diet in the form of peanut butter, candy bars, and roasted and salted peanuts. But how may eating peanuts affect people with diabetes? People with diabetes have to carefully consider their diet. As a result, many of those with the disease wonder if peanuts are fine to eat. This article explores a few things that people with diabetes should be aware of before making the decision to eat peanuts. Are nuts good for people with diabetes? There is a lot of evidence that suggests nuts, on the whole, are good for the health. According to a study posted in Nutrients, nuts and peanuts are full of nutrients. They are often also rich in healthful substances such as: Studies have linked eating nuts to a lower risk of certain heart diseases and gallstones. They may even help with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation. While nuts are high in fat and calories, the research suggests that they may even help with weight loss. From this point of view, they are a much healthier option than other snacks, such as a bag of chips. There are some other factors to consider as well, with peanuts specifically. Glycemic index of peanuts The glycemic index (GI) is used to rate foods based on how slow or fast they cause an increase in blood sugar. Foods lower on the GI scale tend to be converted to sugar slowly and steadily. High GI foods release glucose quickly into the bloodstream. People with diabetes are usually more aware of these numbers. They can inform the person if and when they need to take insulin, and what and when they can eat. The GI scale goes from 0-100. Something with a score of 0 would be anything which has no effect on blood sugar, such as water. A score of 100 is pure glucose. The other common measurement is the glycemic load, Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

7 Surprising Things That Make Blood Sugar Control Easier

Being asleep. Being awake. Hot weather. Cold weather. Seems there’s no end to the number of things that can raise your blood glucose levels. No wonder diabetes management can be such an obstacle course. But it’s not all doom and gloom. For every factor that unexpectedly sends your blood sugars spiralling out of control, there’s an equally unexpected – and often enjoyable – way to keep them under control. 1. Peanut butter We know that peanuts are great for people with diabetes. But one group of researchers from Brazil were more interested in peanut butter (and why wouldn’t they be). The team split participants into three groups: the first ate 1.5 ounces of peanuts; the second had three tablespoons of peanut butter with breakfast; and the third had no peanut butter or peanuts. They all ate the same lunch of white bread and strawberry jam. Interestingly, the researchers found that the peanut butter was better for blood glucose levels than the peanuts. The second group felt fuller for long, and had lower blood sugars when they were tested after lunch. Not all peanut butter is as good for you, of course. But the researchers found that the healthier brands can do you a lot of good. Turns out that peanut butter has a lovely combination of high protein, fibre and healthy oils. So you no longer have to feel ashamed for eating it straight from the jar with a tablespoon. I certainly won’t. 2. Red wine Red wine lowers blood sugars by stopping the intestines absorbing glucose. Recently, plenty of researchers have become very interested in the effects of red wine on weight loss and blood glucose levels. A number of studies reckon it could be beneficial. That said, drinking too much of it can cause problems (such as a build-up of fat around the liver), so everything in m Continue reading >>

Eating Nuts Such As Peanuts Improves Diabetes Control Without Weight Gain

Eating Nuts Such As Peanuts Improves Diabetes Control Without Weight Gain

ALBANY, Ga., Aug. 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- An important new study released in the August issue of Diabetes Care shows that replacing carbohydrates with two ounces of nuts, such as peanuts, everyday improves blood glucose control and blood lipids in people with type 2 diabetes. David Jenkins, MD, PhD, DSc, Principal Investigator and a pioneer in the area of glycemic control for diabetics said, "Nuts, including peanuts, can make a valuable contribution to the diabetic diet by displacing high glycemic index carbohydrates and replacing them with vegetable fats and vegetable proteins which have been shown in the long term to be associated with better cardiovascular health and diabetes prevention." Peanuts have more protein than any other nut and are a source of mono and polyunsaturated oils. The paper reports that, "increased proportions of fat and protein, especially of plant origin, may confer metabolic benefits and reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease and diabetes." The study, "Nuts as a Replacement for Carbohydrates in the Diabetic Diet", was conducted at the University of Toronto. During the study, 117 men and women with type 2 diabetes were randomized into three groups where they received either a full portion of mixed nuts including peanuts, a half portion of both nuts and muffins, or a full portion of muffins. The muffins were made of healthy whole wheat with protein from egg and skim milk powder. Participants' fasting blood glucose were tested every other week. After three months, participants receiving the full portion of nuts showed the biggest decrease in glycated hemoglobin (HgA1c), a measure of blood glucose control. The difference was significantly more than the decrease shown in the participants receiving the half portion of nuts and muffins, a Continue reading >>

Is Eating Groundnuts Safe For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Eating Groundnuts Safe For People With Type 2 Diabetes?

Peanuts аrе packed with a variety оf nutritious properties thаt mау benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Aftеr digestion, thе bоdу turns carbohydrates intо glucose оr sugar, sending thiѕ sugar intо thе blood ѕо insulin саn hеlр turn it intо energy. However, people with diabetes еithеr hаvе sluggish insulin, оr don’t make еnоugh insulin, аnd аѕ a result, tеnd tо experience high blood sugar levels. Eating moderate portions оf carbohydrate-containing foods аnd spreading thеѕе foods thrоughоut thе day helps manage blood sugars. Peanuts аrе a lоw carbohydrate food, аnd small portions -- ѕuсh аѕ a handful a day -- will nоt likеlу саuѕе a significant impact оn blood sugars. Researchers found thаt thоѕе consuming peanut butter, аnd tо a lesser extent, whоlе peanuts, hаd muted blood sugar spikes аftеr bоth thе breakfast аnd thе lunch meal -- suggesting thаt peanuts mау play a role in management оf post-meal blood sugar levels. My doctor told me that I am no longer a diabetic and I can leave all the drugs. "After running the program available at Control Your Blood Sugar Level for about 5 weeks, I became a regular medical examination and laboratory results were surprising. My blood sugar is within normal limits and have more energy than ever! I also lost weight, and I'm excited. Continue reading >>

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

July 8, 2011 -- Eating about 2 ounces of nuts daily in place of carbohydrates may be beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes by lowering bad cholesterol levels and improving blood sugar control, a new study shows. “There are two important factors in caring for diabetes: blood sugar control and heart health,” study researcher Cyril W.C. Kendall, PhD, of the University of Toronto, says in a news release. The study involved 117 people with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group’s members ate about 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, another a healthy muffin, and the third half nuts and half muffin. Researchers say those whose diet included 2 ounces of nuts showed better results after three months in both blood sugar and LDL "bad" cholesterol levels than participants in the other two groups. The nuts consisted of a mixture of unsalted and mostly raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias. The muffin was concocted to be a healthy whole wheat product, sweetened with apple concentrate but with no sugar added. The muffins had similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg white and skim milk powder. Calories from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the nuts were the same as the carbohydrate calories in the muffin, the researchers write. During the three-month study, participants were asked to maintain their oral diabetes medications. The main outcome researchers looked for was change in a marker of blood sugar control called HbA1c. Kendall described the results of the study as “a very exciting and promising finding about the treatment” of type 2 diabetes. The researchers write that the reduction in the HbA1c level was significantly more in those in the nuts-only group than pa Continue reading >>

Going Nuts For Peanuts

Going Nuts For Peanuts

Good nut news! A new study showed that eating peanuts or peanut butter with breakfast limited the rise in blood glucose after both breakfast and lunch. This “second-meal” effect was completely unexpected and exciting. This study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with high type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. Such a long-distance collaboration couldn’t have happened just a few years ago. It was published in the June 2013 edition of the British Journal of Nutrition. The study not only showed reduced blood glucose levels, but also reduced appetite and food consumption for most of the day in people who ate peanuts or peanut butter. This was based on levels of satiety (fullness) hormones as well as self-reports by the subjects and actual food logs. Not only glucose levels, but nonessential fatty acid levels were lower in the people that ate peanuts or peanut butter. The level of the hormone GLP-1, was higher in the peanut butter group, which is very good news. GLP-1 is the hormone that drugs like exenatide (brand name Byetta) try to mimic. It stimulates insulin production, lowers insulin resistance, and decreases appetite. I knew nuts were good for diabetes, but not this good! On the down side, the subjects did not have diabetes. They were “obese women at high risk for Type 2 diabetes.” So we don’t know yet how much benefit peanuts will give people who already have Type 2. Also, the study was quite small, with only 15 subjects. I’m hoping there will be larger studies, but I’m not holding my breath. There’s not a ton of money in boosting peanuts. The American Peanut Council has some Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

Are Salted Peanuts Allowed?

Are Salted Peanuts Allowed?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community i have type 2 diabetes. i love salted peanuts, but once i start i cannot stop eating them. they lower my blood sugar, are they good for diabetics or not? Well they are a bit high in salt, but I do eat some now and again as a snack. I am careful to put a small potion in a bowl though, as you say they are very more-ish, I'd demolish the whole bag if I sat in front of the TV with it! If they work for you and don't cause any bg issues, stick with them! Still may need not to get too carried away and eat loads If you buy red skin peanuts from the supermarket, you can roast them yourself. 200C for 15 mins. They dont really need salt. Alternatively, take them out after 10-12 mins and mix them in a bowl with some kind of chilli/garlic sauce and whack them back in for 5-10 mins. You have to keep an eye on them as once they are overdone, they are inedible. I;ve been doing that for years. Its much cheaper and healthier than buying the salted ones. Salted peanuts are one of my staple snacks - carbs are fine (0.6g carbs per 50g) Tent. peanuts are very high carb and technally they are not a nut they are a legume which i think is a type of beanI used to think they lowered bloods aswell. check bgs after three hhours u might get a hell of a shock. the reason thry lower bgs first is bcause of the fat con I have never found that to be the case. They dont increase my levels at all. Tent. peanuts are very high carb and technally they are not a nut they are a legume which i think is a type of beanI used to think they lowered bloods aswell. check bgs after three hhours u might get a hell of a shock. the reason thry lower bgs first is bcause of the fat con Peanuts are not adv Continue reading >>

Groundnut Health Benefits | Groundnut For Diabetes, Skin, Digestion

Groundnut Health Benefits | Groundnut For Diabetes, Skin, Digestion

Should groundnuts be eaten boiled, roasted or raw? Groundnut is considered to be a healthy food and it is used as a healthy snack the world over. Groundnut was first cultivated in South America; from there it spread to other parts of the world. Groundnut belongs to pea and bean family and it is a legume. The other names for groundnuts are peanuts, pindas, jack nuts, pinders, manila nuts, monkey nuts etc. Groundnuts have a high nutritional value. It is a rich source of energy, high in protein content, vitamins such as A, E, B complex and vitamin C are found abundantly in groundnut. It is a rich source of minerals calcium, copper, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, zinc etc. Groundnut is rich in protein content; it contains more protein than meat, eggs and any other vegetables products except soyabean and yeast. Roasting the groundnut is better as the mineral contents and the essential vitamins are preserved. Digestion of the peanut is better if it is chewed properly and made into paste. Eating fresh roasted groundnuts are valuable if they are mixed with jaggery and milk. This combination is useful in growing children, pregnant women, and lactating mother. Excessive bleeding: It is useful in bleeding disorders, in epistaxis that is bleeding from nose, and in women with excessive menstruation. Diabetes: Eating a handful of groundnuts helps to prevent malnutrition and checks arterial and venous occlusion. Chronic diarrhea: Nicotinic acid deficiency can cause chronic diarrhea, since groundnut is a rich source of nicotinic acid it can be consumed with goats milk. Chewing fresh groundnut helps to restore the strength to the gums and the teeth. Groundnut oil if applied daily on the face, keeps the face fresh and free from acne. Asthmatic person should avoid raw or roasted groun Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

Peanuts are packed with a variety of nutritious properties that may benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Eating peanuts and peanut products may help: promote weight loss lower the risk of cardiovascular disease control blood sugar prevent people from developing diabetes in the first place However, peanuts also carry some potential risks. If you have type 2 diabetes, read on to learn more about the risks and benefits of eating peanuts. Adding peanuts and peanut butter to your diet may be beneficial, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. While not technically nuts, peanuts provide many of the same health benefits as tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, and pecans. Peanuts are also less expensive than most other nuts, which is great if you’re looking to save money but still want the nutritional rewards. Peanuts help control blood sugar If you have diabetes, you need to consider the glycemic content of the foods you eat. Glycemic content is based on how quickly your body converts carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar are given a higher value. Water, which has no effect on blood sugar, has a GI value of 0. Peanuts have a GI value of 13, which makes them a low GI food. According to an article in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating peanuts or peanut butter in the morning may help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Peanuts may also help lessen the insulin spike of higher GI foods when paired together. One reason that peanuts may help control blood sugar is because they contain a large amount of magnesium. A single serving of peanuts (about 28 peanuts) contains 12 percent of the daily recommended amount Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

If you have diabetes, beware of peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut oil. Some people think that because most tree nuts, like almonds, are so healthy, that peanuts should also be good for us. But peanuts aren’t nuts at all. They are a legume, and unlike most nuts we can’t eat them raw because they are sometimes covered with a dangerous fungus. Actually, we can’t eat them at all if we want to avoid some of the side effects that we can get from them. Some of these side effects can be quite serious. I can think of only nine reasons why we have to avoid peanuts or anything made from them. Maybe you can think of more, but these eight might be enough to give anyone pause: 1. Peanuts have a lot of carbohydrates, which raise our blood sugar level. Take a look at the US Department of Agriculture’s [National Nutrient Database](which is the gold standard of nutrient facts. "One tablespoon of natural, unsweetened peanut butter contains 3 grams of carbohydrate and will raise my blood sugar 15 mg/dl," writes Dr. Richard K. Bernstein in the 2011 edition of his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. "Imagine the effect on blood sugar of downing 10 tablespoons!" 2. Peanuts are the source of one of the most common food allergies. "They have the potential to provoke acute allergic reactions (e.g., hives or anaphylaxis) that can be dangerous in the susceptible, even fatal in rare instances," writes Dr. William Davis in his 2011 book, Wheat Belly. Many schools will no longer let children bring peanut butter products to school. 3. Peanuts "contain lectins and other anti-nutrients that can adversely affect your health, particularly if you are suffering from an autoimmune disorder," writes Loren Cordain in his 2002 book, The Paleo Diet. These lectins "are known to increase intestinal Continue reading >>

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