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Is Gout Caused By Diabetes?

Startling Research Findings: A Newly Discovered Cause Of High Blood Pressure And Obesity?

Startling Research Findings: A Newly Discovered Cause Of High Blood Pressure And Obesity?

If you have been reading my recent articles about fructose you will probably recognize Dr. Richard Johnson. Dr. Johnson is one of the physicians on the cutting edge of sugar metabolism research today, his focus being on how the overabundance of sugar in the American diet -- particularly fructose -- is causing obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and a number of other health problems in staggering numbers. In this lecture, Dr. Johnson takes a more historical approach to obesity and cardiovascular disease, reviewing the important uric acid connection and some interesting evolutionary findings related to the way humans metabolize sugar. Cardiology is a Relatively NEW Field Obesity rates have paralleled sugar consumption trends in Western civilization. Although the obesity epidemic is relatively recent, obesity is not a new phenomenon. In 1860, the prevalence of a BMI (body mass index) of 30 or higher (which defines obesity) was 1.6 percent among 50 year-old men. By 1900, it had tripled, and it has sharply increased over the past century. Like obesity, hypertension was also rare prior to the twentieth century: In 1900, only 5 percent of the population had a blood pressure of 140/90 or higher. By 1939, 10 percent of adults had blood pressures above 140/90. Today, 31 percent of adults are hypertensive. Prior to 1940, there was no such thing as a cardiologist because there was no need for them. That was only 70 years ago! The first reported angina was in 1929. In 1950, there were 500 cardiologists in the United States. Now there are 35,000 -- and they perform more than one million heart surgeries annually. What is driving this eruption of cardiovascular disease? One key factor: the explosion of sugar in the Western diet. Sugar used to be quite expensive. It was a nonessential food Continue reading >>

How Fat Affects Gout

How Fat Affects Gout

Adding pounds raises uric acid levels and increases risk for flares. Painful gout attacks are caused by an excess of uric acid in the body that leads to the buildup of flare-triggering uric acid crystals around joints. The more you weigh, the less efficient your body is at removing uric acid, says Hyon Choi, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the Gout and Crystal Arthropathy Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Carrying extra weight slows down the removal of uric acid by the kidneys. Elevated levels of this acid are the primary culprit in the development of gout and its disabling attacks. “There’s a very tight association between excess weight and the risk of developing gout and gout flares. It’s a dose-response relationship, meaning the more you weigh, the higher your risk, and the more likely you are to have recurrent attacks,” Dr. Choi says. Insulin resistance, a state in which insulin levels remain abnormally high because the body has reduced sensitivity to the hormone, is likely the major player in the increased risk of gout linked to body fat. More Fat, More Uric Acid When people are overweight or obese, their bodies produce more insulin. “Higher levels of insulin circulating throughout the body inhibit uric acid elimination by the kidneys. This excess uric acid can lead to gout and gout attacks,” says Dr. Choi. Because uric acid level is dynamic, like blood pressure, many factors can move it up or down, says rheumatologist Puja Khanna, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “Stress, dehydration and certain medications, such as diuretics, can cause a jump in uric acid, as can weight gain,” she says. “One study found that just gaining 10 pounds over four months was associated with an Continue reading >>

Bidirectional Association Between Diabetes And Gout: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

Bidirectional Association Between Diabetes And Gout: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

We aimed to prospectively investigate the bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gout. We analyzed follow-up data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, when self-reports of diagnosed diabetes and gout were enquired at follow-ups I and II. Individuals who participated in both follow-ups and were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer at follow-up I were included. For T2D to gout (analysis I), prevalent gout were further excluded (final n = 31,137). For gout to T2D (analysis II), prevalent diabetes were excluded (final n = 28,668). Cox regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs). In the analysis I, the RR of diabetes to incident gout (682 cases) was 0.77 (95% CI 0.60–0.97). In the analysis II, the RR of gout to incident diabetes (2223 cases) was 1.36 (1.12–1.63), but became insignificant after adjustment for hypertension and BMI (1.00; 0.83–1.21). The gout to diabetes association was modified by BMI (Pinteraction = 0.04) and hypertension (Pinteraction = 0.007), and it was marginally significant in adults with BMI<24 while significant among non-hypertensive participants, but not in their counterparts. In conclusion, our results suggest that diabetes is associated with a lower risk of incident gout, while gout is positively related to diabetes among normal weight and non-hypertensive adults. Diabetes is a leading risk factor for global disease burden1, and it has been estimated that 387 million people had diabetes in 2014, and the number will rise to 592 million by 20352. The prevalence of diabetes in the developing countries has increased dramatically and is fast approaching that in the developed countries. For example, a recent national survey in China has reported a prevalence of diabetes as 11.6% in Chinese adults3. Meanw Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gout

Diabetes And Gout

diabetes and gout a troublesome combination Diabetes and Gout; Of the millions of people world wide suffering Gout , there is a large proportion of sufferers who also have Diabetes. Diabetes and Gout. This association is quite obvious for the following reasons: Gout is associated with Obesity. Gout is also associated with Hypertension or high blood pressure. Diabetes is associated with : High blood pressure , Obesity ( obviously high blood sugar - but I am relating this to gout at this stage) Both are a Metabolic Disorder . Both have a potential genetic inheritance . Both can be partially treated by keeping your weight under control, eating low fat foods, keeping your intake of vegetables and whole grain foods up, and exercising. Both require a reduction of fats and oils, sugars, meat, eggs, full cream milk and poultry. Diabetes and Gout ; Both Afflictions have different levels : Gout : Asymptomatic Acute Interval Chronic Tophaceous Diabetes: So what is Diabetes Like gout Diabetes is a chronic condition, ( persistent or long lasting in all of its effects) Insulin is needed to convert glucose or sugar from the food we eat into energy. People with diabetic issues generally have no production of low production of insulin causing the sugar or glucose levels to stay in our blood stream. the glucose in our blood is called glycaemia. Pre - diabetes This is where the fasting blood glucose os elevated higher than is considered normal levels but not high enough to be classified as Type 2 Diabetes, but can process to type 2 diabetes easily if not monitored. Type 1 diabetes - 10 - 15% of all diabetic cases are Type 1. Generally Type 1 diabetes can be linked to genetic inheritance. A healthy lifestyle is required to help maintain this disease. Typical symptoms are excessive thirst, Continue reading >>

How To Eat When You Have Gout & Diabetes

How To Eat When You Have Gout & Diabetes

Gout is a form of arthritis that is often characterized by severe and sudden pain. Most commonly, symptoms of gout are felt in the big toe but can also affect other joints. According to the Purine Research Society, gout is one of the oldest known metabolic diseases and is caused by an overproduction of uric acid. A study published in the "New Zealand Medical Journal" found that patients with type-2 diabetes have a greater chance of developing gout. Eating foods lower in uric acid may help to reduce the chances of another painful gout attack. Video of the Day Limit animal proteins in your diet. According to the Mayo Clinic, all animal products contain purines which can cause higher uric acid. Animal proteins with the most purines include organ meats, red meat and fatty fish. Add more vegetables, fruits and whole wheat grains to your diet. These foods provide vitamins and minerals and help to maintain a healthy balance in your body. Increase your water intake. Water can help to remove any uric acid buildup in your body. Drink at least eight glasses of water a day. Avoid drinking alcohol. Alcohol interferes with the uric acid removal in your body. Eat nonfat dairy products to reduce your chances of a gout flare-up. According to the Mayo Clinic, some research has linked lower fat dairy products to a lower risk of gout. Avoid sugar. If you have diabetes, limiting your sugar intake is important for your health. Staying away from sugar is also important if you have had gout in the past. Although it is not known if sugar has an effect on uric acids in your body, eating sugar leads to obesity which is a risk factor for gout. Continue reading >>

What Is Gout?

What Is Gout?

What Is Gout? The human body is a marvel of balance and equilibrium. When something is thrown off-kilter, disease or illness usually occurs. That’s exactly the case with gout, a painful arthritic condition that usually affects the big toe. What Causes Gout? Gout is caused by an imbalance of uric acid. All people process uric acid as a result of breaking down internal tissues and certain foods (animal proteins, asparagus, mushrooms, and others). During normal functioning, the kidneys excrete uric acid into the urine. However, some individuals have so much uric acid that it cannot all be excreted or the kidneys cannot function well enough to process normal amounts of uric acid. In either case, the extra uric acid builds up in the body and forms needle-like crystal deposits around joints. This buildup quickly leads to painful gout attacks. The most common location for flare-ups is the big toe. Other gout sites include the ankles, knees, elbows, and fingers. What Are The Symptoms of Gout? An individual suffering from a gout flare up will have a sudden onset of pain, inflammation, stiffness, and redness at the affected joint. Patients usually experience the most severe pain within the first 24 hours of the attack. After that, symptoms may linger for three to ten days. Individuals may not experience another attack for several months. However, subsequent attacks are likely to be more severe. How Is Gout Diagnosed? Doctors may use one or two methods to diagnose gout. One option is to draw fluid from the affected joint. A lab tech will examine the fluid under a microscope and specifically look for uric acid crystals. The lab may also look for signs of infection, which could cause gout-like symptoms. Another diagnostic option is a simple blood test. If the results show a high l Continue reading >>

5 Foods You Shouldn't Eat If You Have Gout

5 Foods You Shouldn't Eat If You Have Gout

All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. © 2017 Health Media Ventures, Inc. Health.com is part of the Time Inc. Food Collection and the MyRecipes Network. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. See the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy (Your California Rights)for more information. Ad Choices Continue reading >>

Professional Opinion: What Is 'gout' And Why Is It Called 'the Rich Man's Disease'? | Island Packet

Professional Opinion: What Is 'gout' And Why Is It Called 'the Rich Man's Disease'? | Island Packet

This week, Dr. Christopher Madison, a family medicine physician with Coastal Carolina Hospital who practices at Bluffton-Okatie Primary Care, discusses gout. Question: A friend of mine complains about his "big toe disease" or gout. I thought this was some old-fashioned disease or a made up thing. Is this a real condition? If so, what is gout and what causes it? Answer: Gout is a painful type of arthritis. References to gout have been recorded as far back as ancient Egypt. It has been called "the rich man's disease" especially during the depression, because it was thought to be caused by a "rich" diet, heavy in meat. We all have a chemical, uric acid, in our blood as a byproduct of normal metabolism. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for unlimited digital access to our website, apps, the digital newspaper and more. SUBSCRIBE NOW Uric acid is eliminated in our urine, and some people cannot eliminate as well as others. Too much remains in the blood and, in some of these people, the uric acid will form sharp crystals which deposit in the joints. The most common joint is between the foot and big toe, which is called podagra. With these crystals now in the joint, the body quickly reacts, and the joint will become swollen, red and very painful. The diagnosis of gout is usually clinical, based on the history and examination. Fluid from the joint may be obtained to look for uric acid crystals to confirm the diagnosis. Lab tests to check the uric acid level in the blood will be needed. I would compare the gout attack to opening a joint and pouring in ground-up glass. Ouch! Gout attacks can be frequent or years apart. Risk factors for gout include obesity, diabetes, hypertension and renal failure. Diet also plays a role. Alcohol, meat and seafood can increase the frequency o Continue reading >>

Gout And Diabetes – The Connection

Gout And Diabetes – The Connection

Gout is a form of chronic arthritis that can lead to pain, swelling and ultimately joint destruction and kidney problems. Gout and diabetes have some of the same risk factors. Learn more about the connection between gout and diabetes and what you can do about it. Gout occurs when high levels of uric acid crystallize and are deposited around the joints and in soft tissue. This can lead to a type of inflammatory arthritis, causing pain, swelling and itchiness in areas such as the big toe, ankles, wrists, fingers, knees, heels and elbows. If gout is untreated, the uric acid crystals can become hardened lumps that can lead to compromised joints and kidney problems. Gout has been linked with diabetes for years. Diabetes and gout share a few common risk factors. Being overweight or obese can make people more prone to developing diabetes type 2 and/or gout. Other factors include insulin resistance, decreased circulation, elevated uric acid levels, a diet high in saturated fats and a lack of exercise. Gout occurs when too much uric acid is formed and the kidneys cannot process it. Risks for gout can include excessive alcohol use, genetic tendencies, illness or surgery, taking diuretics, joint injury and high blood fat levels as well as radiation, chemotherapy, certain medications, fad dieting, consuming excessive fructose (such as the type found in sweetened sodas) and eating a lot of shellfish, red meat and/or liver. A simple blood test can be done to determine your level of uric acid and whether you are prone to developing gout. People with elevated levels of uric acid are also more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease. To reduce the chance of developing gout, eat a well-balanced diet with limited animal protein. Minimize your intake of red meat, shellfish and organ m Continue reading >>

Help For Diabetes, Gout And More

Help For Diabetes, Gout And More

Overview of Gout Gout is a systemic disease caused by the buildup of uric acid in the joints, leading to inflammation, swelling, and pain. This condition can develop for two reasons. The liver may well produce more uric acid than the body can excrete in the urine, or even a diet of rich meals (e.g., red meat, lotion sauces, red wine) puts a lot more uric acid into the system than the kidneys can filter. In both cases, a condition called hyperuricemia results. As time passes, the uric acid crystallizes and forms in the shared spaces, most commonly in the very first metatarsal phalangeal joint of the big toe or even in the ankle joint. Signs and Symptoms The most common symptoms of gout are inflammation, swelling, and tenderness in the joint of the first toe. Coming in contact with or moving it is intensely painful and patients often say it hurts to have as much as a bedsheet over the bottom. Gout develops quickly as well as typically occurs in only one joint at any given time. Symptoms May Develop in Two or Three Joints At the Same Time, but this is Rare If widespread symptoms occur, the condition is probably not gout. Diagnosis The most reliable way to diagnose gout is to examine the joint fluid for uric acid crystals. This is done by drawing fluid from the joint with a needle and examining it under a polarized light microscope. Although the test is actually invasive, the results are defined, and also a positive result facilitates proper treatment and also quick relief. Treatment Therapy for Gout Involves Decreasing the Amount of Uric Acid in the Combined In the event that dietary habits are the main cause, the person's lifestyle should be changed to avoid the condition. Gout is readily corrected with patient cooperation, and it is usually not taken care of unless it oc Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Have A Gout Attack

What To Do If You Have A Gout Attack

This information is for people who have gout and their whānau/family. It explains the things that you and your whānau/family can do to prevent and treat gout. How to prevent gout attacks How to treat gout attacks Take gout medicine every day, if your doctor has prescribed it Keep to a healthy weight Eat three meals each day Choose small servings of meat, chicken and seafood Enjoy low-fat dairy foods each day Drink less alcohol Drink plenty of water Go to your doctor for some pain-relieving medicine as soon as you can Protect the part of your body that hurts Rest, put an ice pack on the sore joint, and raise it Keep taking gout medicine every day See your doctor again if you don’t get any better after 24 hours Following the advice will help you to get on top of gout so that: the pain of gout goes away if you get gout attacks they won’t be as painful damage to your joints and kidneys stops gout won’t get in the way of you working, being active or enjoying your favourite foods. Your doctor will help you to make a plan to manage your gout well. Go back to the doctor for regular check-ups to talk about how your gout plan is working. You might find it helpful to write down what you talk about with the doctor so that you and your whānau/family know what to do. Ask your doctor or nurse to explain anything you are not sure about. Talk with your whānau/family about how they can support you to get enough exercise and eat foods that will help to prevent gout. Encourage them to get treatment if they have signs of gout because it may run in your family. The most important things to remember are: Gout can damage your joints and your kidneys if it is not treated. If you are prescribed a medicine to prevent gout attacks, you must take it every day. Watching what you eat and dr Continue reading >>

Gout-friendly Eating: Nutrition Guidelines & Diet Restrictions

Gout-friendly Eating: Nutrition Guidelines & Diet Restrictions

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by too much uric acid in the blood. Excess uric acid can lead to a buildup of fluid surrounding the joints, which can result in uric acid crystals. The formation of these crystals causes the joints to swell, become inflamed, and cause intense pain. The good news is that you can control gout. In addition to taking medications, dietary and lifestyle changes can help prevent painful attacks. A gout-friendly diet involves a specific plan, which is designed to avoid painful gout attacks. Learn more about which foods to include — and those to avoid — to help prevent symptoms. What Causes Gout? Gout develops when there is too much uric acid in the blood. This over-abundance of uric acid may be the result a diet high in purines. Or, your body may produce too much uric acid. In some cases, blood uric acid levels may remain normal, yet gout is still the correct diagnosis. This is due to the body excreting excess uric acid in the urine and inflammatory factors. What Are Purines Anyway? Purines are chemical compounds that, when metabolized, are broken down into uric acid. Purines are either made by your body, or taken into your body through foods you eat. In a normal process, purines break down into uric acid. The uric acid is then dissolved in the blood, passed through the kidneys into the urine, and eliminated from the body. However, this isn’t usually the case in gout. Complications occur when the kidneys don’t get rid of uric acid fast enough, or if there is an increased amount of uric acid production. These high levels build up in the blood, leading to what is known as hyperuricemia. Though not classified as a disease, hyperuricemia can be dangerous if it leads to the formation of uric acid crystals. Gout can develop when these crysta Continue reading >>

What Foods Are Best For Someone With Type 2 Diabetes And Gout?

What Foods Are Best For Someone With Type 2 Diabetes And Gout?

Because gout is an inflammatory condition caused by elevated blood levels of uric acid, dietary management includes limiting high-purine foods that tend to increase uric acid levels. However, research has shown that unlike high-purine animal foods like organ meats and most seafood, vegetables high in purines do not raise uric acid levels, so they can be included in your diet regularly. Here is a list of lower-carb foods that are also gout-friendly: Non-starchy vegetables, including high-purine types like asparagus, cauliflower, mushrooms, and spinach Berries, melon (up to 2 one-cup servings per day) Salmon, chicken, turkey, beef, and pork (4-6 ounces per day) Eggs Cheese, cottage cheese, and yogurt Nuts and seeds Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. dLife does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Reliance on any information provided by dLife, its employees and other contributors or visitors to this site is done solely at your own ris Continue reading >>

I Have Been Diagnosed With Gout And Have Type 1 Diabetes. Any Suggestions About Diet?

I Have Been Diagnosed With Gout And Have Type 1 Diabetes. Any Suggestions About Diet?

A: Gout is a type of arthritis caused by high blood uric acid levels. Gout “attacks” joints, often resulting in extreme pain due to a build-up of uric acid crystals. In the past, people with gout used to manage it by making changes in their diet. Today, there are effective medicines that can better treat it and reduce the number of flare-ups. However, dietary changes may still be helpful. A diet for gout limits purines, which are found primarily in animal foods (meat, seafood, poultry and organ meats). You don’t have to stop eating these foods, but it’s a good idea to limit your portions of these foods to about 4 to 6 ounces per day. It’s also important to limit your intake of alcoholic beverages (especially beer) to no more than one to two servings per day, as alcohol can hinder the body’s ability to get rid of uric acid. If you have a flare-up, avoid drinking alcohol until it subsides. Drink plenty of water to help flush out uric acid, and consider adding some fat free or low fat dairy foods to your eating plan, such as nonfat or lowfat milk or yogurt, as some studies show that dairy foods may help prevent gout. Finally, being overweight puts you at risk for gout, so losing weight, if you need to, may lower your chances of a flare-up. A “diet” for gout should not greatly affect your diabetes, provided that you’re controlling or counting your carbohydrates and not missing meals. Consider meeting with a dietitian if you need help with carb counting and/or insulin adjustments around your carb intake, and/or if you’d like guidance for weight loss. Continue reading >>

Related Services

Related Services

Gout is a health problem that causes inflamed, painful joints. The symptoms are caused by deposits of urate crystals at the joints. Gout used to be associated with kings who overindulged in rich food and wine. In truth, anyone can get gout. Gout affects more men than women. It is often linked with obesity, high blood pressure, high levels of lipids in the blood (hyperlipidemia), and diabetes. Gout is caused by monosodium urate crystal deposits in the joints. This is due to an excess of uric acid in the body. Too much uric acid may be caused by several things. It may be caused by the body making too much uric acid. Or the kidneys may not get rid of enough uric acid. It may also be caused by eating a lot of foods that are high in purines. Purines turn into uric acid in the body. Foods high in purines include: Alcoholic drinks and sugary drinks high in fructose Certain meats, such as game meats, kidney, brains, and liver Dried beans and dried peas Seafood, such as anchovies, herring, scallops, sardines, and mackerel Gout attacks may be triggered by any of the following: Drinking alcohol Eating a lot of protein-rich foods Emotional stress Fatigue Illness Minor surgery You are at higher risk for gout if you: Are a man Are a postmenopausal woman Have kidney disease Have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes Have family members with gout Gout causes sudden, recurrent attacks of symptoms that often occur without warning. Severe, chronic gout may lead to deformity. Symptoms can occur a bit differently in each person. Common symptoms include: Chills Fever General feeling of illness Hard lumps of urate crystal deposits under the skin (tophi) Severe, sudden pain in one or more joints, most often the joint in the big toe Skin that is red or purple, tight, and shiny over Continue reading >>

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