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Is Gluten Free For Diabetics?

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Managing diabetes means monitoring your carbohydrate intake to help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. An additional diagnosis of celiac disease adds another layer of complexity to eating. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which people cannot tolerate gluten.1 Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—it helps dough rise and keep its shape and texture. Treatment of celiac includes eating a gluten-free diet. Common foods that are made with gluten include:2 pasta; bread; cereal; beverages such as beer; couscous; tortillas; crackers; cookies, cakes, muffins, and pastries; dressings, sauces, and gravies; and wheat-based flours such as white flour, wheat flour, kamut, semolina, spelt, and wheat bran. This list might seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of gluten-free versions of popular foods such as bread, pasta, and crackers that can be found in your local grocery store. For people with celiac and diabetes, however, it is important to consider the carb count—especially because many gluten-free foods are made with flours that contain less fiber and have a higher glycemic index. The golden rule? Get in the habit of checking the labels of anything you put in your mouth or on your skin (for both gluten and carbs). Hide-and-Seek with Gluten Labels can sometimes be deceiving. Just because something is labeled as “wheat-free” does not mean it is gluten-free. Always examine labels for buzz words such as wheat, barley, or rye, and if you have any questions, contact the manufacturer directly before eating. Certain additives in packaged foods contain traces of gluten—ask your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease for a complete list of unsafe ingredients and foods. It is also impo Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diet Could Be Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

Gluten-free Diet Could Be Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

A gluten-free diet has been on the rise as a purportedly healthier way to eat — but research out of Harvard University in the United States suggests it could instead be linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes. While people with coeliac disease or gluten intolerance avoid gluten as a matter of medical necessity, people without those disorders have also turned to a gluten-free diet as a lifestyle choice. But research presented to an American Heart Association conference overnight suggests those people could be doing harm to their health by entirely cutting out foods like bread, cereals and pasta. The study saw researchers estimate the daily gluten intake of over 200,000 participants in different long-term health studies which spanned more than 30 years. Over time, the 20 per cent of participants who ate the highest daily amount of gluten were found to have a 13 per cent lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate the least amount of gluten. Geng Zong from Harvard University's Department of Nutrition said the results suggested eating foods with gluten could lower people's risk of type 2 diabetes. "Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fibre and other micronutrients ... making them less nutritious," he said. "People without coeliac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes." University of Canberra Associate Professor of nutritional science Duane Mellor said decreased diabetes risk may be linked to foods commonly found alongside gluten, rather than the protein itself. "It's unclear whether the gluten is actually the thing that's protecting them from getting type 2 diabetes," he said. "It could be that other things that you tend to find gluten with, we tend to find things like Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Diabetes And Celiac Disease

What is celiac disease? An autoimmune disease which is the result of an immune system response to the ingestion of gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley) in susceptible individuals. This response to gluten damages the small intestine, leading to malabsorption of nutrients, and related health issues. Can cause food and medications to be absorbed poorly. This can lead to symptoms of starvation, nutrient and medication malabsorption. The only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. If the diet is followed, the intestinal damage will slowly heal. This can take several months or longer. The disease is lifelong. Intestinal damage occurs each time gluten is consumed. Celiac disease affects about one in every 133 people in the United States. Diabetes and celiac disease: The link There is a genetic link between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. (There is no connection between Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease.) Developing one of the diseases increases the risk of developing the other. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with Type 1 diabetes is about 6% worldwide. When a family has two children who have Type 1 diabetes, there is a much higher chance that someone in the family will have celiac disease. Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Celiac disease can cause unstable blood sugar control. CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms… Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. Other symptoms… Chronic fatigue, bone pain, muscle cramps, balance problems, migraine headaches, seizures, behavior and memory problems, neuropathies, growth and maturation delays, infertility, bone disease, dental enamel defects, and more. Gluten-free grains and starches The following grains and starches Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Actually Increase Risks Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets Actually Increase Risks Of Type 2 Diabetes

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. It’s hard not to notice that the range of gluten-free foods available in supermarkets has increased massively in recent years. This is partly because the rise in the number of people diagnosed with coeliac disease and gluten sensitivity, and partly because celebrities, such as Gwyneth Paltrow, Miley Cyrus and Victoria Beckham, have praised gluten-free diets. What used to be prescription-only food is now a global health fad. But for how much longer? New research from Harvard University has found a link between gluten-free diets and an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Gluten is a protein found in cereals such as wheat, rye and barley. It is particularly useful in food production. For example, it gives elasticity to dough, helping it to rise and keep its shape, and providing a chewy texture. Many types of foods may contain gluten, including less obvious ones such as salad dressing, soup and beer. The same protein that is so useful in food production is a nightmare for people with coeliac disease. Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the body mistakenly reacts to gluten as if it were a threat to the body. The condition is quite common, affecting one in 100 people, but only a quarter of those who have the disease have been diagnosed. There is evidence that the popularity of gluten-free diets has surged, even though the incidence of coeliac disease has remained stable. This is potentially due to increasing numbers of people with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. In these cases, people exhibit some of the symptoms of coelaic disease but without having an immune response. In either case, avoiding gluten in foods is the only reliable way to control symptoms, that may Continue reading >>

Going Gluten Free May Raise Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

Going Gluten Free May Raise Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

If you don't have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity, here's one reason you might not want to give up bread entirely. Good news, bread lovers: Eating gluten may be one way to reduce your type 2 diabetes risk, according to preliminary research presented yesterday at an American Heart Association meeting in Portland, Oregon. The study authors say more research is needed to draw firm conclusions, but that their findings might be one reason to reconsider going gluten free. For people with celiac disease or a diagnosed gluten sensitivity, of course, going gluten free isn't optional. But this type of diet has become more popular in recent years in people without those conditions, even though there’s not much evidence that cutting out gluten—a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley—does much for long-term health. So Harvard researchers decided to investigate the link between gluten consumption and health outcomes, gathering data from three long-running studies involving nearly 200,000 people total. People in these studies filled out food-frequency questionnaires every two years, and also had their health monitored regularly. Over roughly three decades, more than 15,000 participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that most participants had gluten intakes below 12 grams a day, and that within this range, those on the higher end were less likely to develop diabetes. One reason that low gluten intake might be associated with higher diabetes risk was that people who ate less gluten also tended to eat less fiber, the researchers noticed. Controlling for this measure explained part of the disparity, but not all of it. Those in the highest percentile for gluten consumption still had a 13% lower diabetes risk than those in the lowest, who ate less Continue reading >>

Go Gluten-free All Day

Go Gluten-free All Day

These gluten-free, diabetic-friendly recipes are tasty and easy to make. We've included breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack, and drink recipes so you can be gluten free throughout your day. Continue reading >>

Should I Start Following A Gluten-free Diet?

Should I Start Following A Gluten-free Diet?

I have had type 1 diabetes for 20 years. In the past, none of my doctors have suggested that I follow a gluten-free diet. My new doctor and pharmacist have both proclaimed the advantages of this kind of diet. Is there any merit to going gluten free when you have diabetes? Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Diabetes 5-day Meal Plan

Celiac Disease And Diabetes 5-day Meal Plan

Designed by CDF Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, Janelle Smith, the Celiac and Diabetes 5-Day Meal Plan helps those with a dual diagnosis of diabetes and celiac disease or non-celiac wheat sensitivity to eat nutritiously and safely. IMPORTANT: Always check food labels to get the most accurate carbohydrate count for dosing insulin. Consult your endocrinologist or certified diabetes educator/dietitian to help modify the meal plan for your individual needs. Monday Breakfast – GF Banana Oatmeal (65 g carb, 452 calories) 3/4 cup Bob’s Red Mill quick gluten-free oatmeal (44 g carb) ½ banana (15 g carb) 1/8 cup walnut pieces (2 g carb) 1/3 cup 1% fat milk (4 g carb) AM Snack – Cheese and crackers (14 g carb, 207 calories) 1 oz cheddar cheese (0 g carb) 10 Crunchmaster Multiseed crackers (14 g carb) Lunch – Turkey sandwich (62 g carb, 459 calories) 2 slices Rudi’s multigrain gluten-free bread (34 g carb) 4 oz sliced turkey (2 g carb) 1 tsp mayo, 1 tsp mustard, romaine lettuce, tomato (1-2 g carb) 1 medium-large apple (24 g carb) PM Snack – Pretzels and hummus (14 g carb, 78 calories) 12 Snyder’s GF pretzel sticks (12 g carb) 1 tbsp plain hummus (2 g carb) Dinner – Chicken Pasta Alfredo (61 g carb, 474 calories) 1 serving Dairy-free pasta alfredo (44 g carb) 2 tbsp sundried tomatoes (10 g carb) 1 grilled chicken breast (0 g carb) 6 grilled asparagus spears (6 g carb) Dessert – Strawberries and cream (14 g carb, 84 calories) 1 cup strawberries (12 g carb) 2 tbsp whipped topping (2 g carb) Tuesday Breakfast – Hot cereal topped with yogurt (62 g carb, 459 calories) 1/2 cup cooked (¼ cup uncooked) Hodgson Mill buckwheat with flaxseed (33 g carb) ½ cup nonfat greek yogurt (5 g carb) 2 tsp honey (12 g carb) 10 hazelnuts chopped (5 g carb) ½ tsp ground cinnamo Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets May Raise Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says

Gluten-free Diets May Raise Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says

Raise a toast: It may be time to cast off the shackles of gluten-free diets once and for all. Research from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggests that abstaining from gluten, a protein found in many grains, may actually increase your risk of chronic disease, particularly type 2 diabetes. A 30-year observational analysis of almost 200,000 people suggests that gluten devotees develop type 2 diabetes less often than occasional consumers, so long as intake does not exceed 12 grams per day. The research also shows gluten-phobes tend to eat less cereal fiber, a type of fiber found in bran, barley, and other whole grains that’s known to guard against type 2 diabetes. When also accounting for cereal fiber, the top 20 percent of gluten eaters—the cream of the wheat, if you will—have an estimated 13 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes than those on the bottom of the spectrum, the study says. While those with Celiac disease or diagnosed gluten sensitivity should of course abstain, Harvard’s Geng Zong says those who eat gluten-free foods as a lifestyle choice may want to think twice. “Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more,” Zong says. “People without Celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes.” While the findings—which were presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions—are exciting for all the bread fans out there, they do come with a few caveats. First, the study was observational, meaning its results are based on behaviors reported in subjects’ food-frequency questionnaires—not thos Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Eat A Gluten-free Diet For Type 2 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Eat A Gluten-free Diet For Type 2 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

(NaturalNews) New research finds that almost one in four adolescents in the United States have diabetes or pre-diabetes, according to The New York Times. These are not children with juvenile diabetes but full-on type 2 diabetes. More than 25 million adults already have diabetes and 79 million may have prediabetes, yet few people consider a diabetes diet. There is a definite correlation between diet and diabetes symptoms. Studies suggest that eating a gluten-free diet without dairy could be good for diabetes and celiac disease, a condition characterized by an allergy to gluten. Diabetes and celiac The only treatment for celiac disease is following a gluten-free diet. Gluten is a protein found in most grains, including wheat, barely and rye. Adopting a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms in people with celiac and those who are sensitive to gluten, yet a study published in Diabetologia journal reports that diabetics should consider a gluten-free diet too. The study observed people with type 2 diabetes on the Paleo diet versus the Mediterranean diet. The Paleo diet calls for no grains, no dairy, no salt. It recommends fruits, vegetables, nuts, seafood and lean meats. The diet is based on how early man ate and discourages any processed foods. The Mediterranean diet also allows fruits, vegetables, seafood and lean meats. The main difference is that the Mediterranean diet recommends unrefined grains, such as whole grain products. A little dairy is also acceptable on the diet. The results of this study found that people on the Mediterranean diet had very little, if any, improvement in diabetes symptoms. The group who followed the Paleo diet experienced a reverse in diabetes symptoms, showing a clear correlation between a gluten-free diet and diabetes. The Mediterranean group exp Continue reading >>

Your Decision To Go Gluten-free Is Raising Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Warns

Your Decision To Go Gluten-free Is Raising Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Warns

Your decision to go gluten-free is raising your risk of Type 2 diabetes, study warns By Carmen Chai Senior National Online Journalist, Health Global News Followers of the gluten-free diet swear that it helps them lose weight and avoid bloating, but new research is warning that ruling out gluten if you dont have to is increasing your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Followers of the gluten-free diet swear that it helps them lose weight and avoid bloating, but new research is warning that ruling out gluten if you dont have to is increasing your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Doctors out of Harvard University say that while the gluten-free craze has taken off, people who dont have celiac disease or gluten intolerance may be hurting their health by adopting the fad diet. We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten, Dr. Geng Zong, a research fellow at the schools nutrition department, said. Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fibre and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. People without Celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes, he said. READ MORE: Heres what you need to know about prediabetes and your risk of Type 2 diabetes There are about 300,000 Canadians living with celiac disease , according to Health Canada . Its a food sensitivity triggered by gluten, causing damage to the small intestine while leaving patients with inflammation and abdominal pain among other symptoms. Right now, the only way people manage celiac disease is by following a strict gluten-free diet. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley its what gives bread and other baked goods th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet

Diabetes Diet

Those that suffer from diabetes mellitus know that regulating their diet is one of the most imperative means of controlling the disease’s ill-effects. Eating the right foods can help lower blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels to prevent the potential complications of the condition. Learn how dietary changes can improve your health, what changes to make, and how to make these changes with the information included below. Why Does Diet Help? Diabetes mellitus is a disease characterized by the body’s inability to effectively regulate the production of insulin, a hormone that regulates glucose in the bloodstream. Insulin is naturally produced in the pancreas, and it enables cells both to absorb glucose compounds from the bloodstream when needed and to store excess quantities of the sugar in the liver when they are not. Patients afflicted by diabetes mellitus lack sufficient insulin to perform these tasks due to insufficient production of the hormone, an inability to utilize the insulin that is produced, or some combination thereof. This inability to produce or utilize insulin may result in a buildup of glucose in the bloodstream that can consequently damage blood vessels throughout the body. This destruction, in turn, may lead to complications like heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. When insulin is in short supply, in addition to taking injections of the hormone, patients may seek to prevent the damage caused by excess amounts of glucose by reducing their intake of foods that contain it. This doesn’t just mean avoiding foods with refined sugars like candy and soda, but it also requires patients to recognize foods that metabolize into glucose and to control the consumption of any substance that adds sugar to the bloodstream when digested. Regulati Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets May Be Tied To An Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets May Be Tied To An Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gluten-free diets are all the rage, but shunning gluten may offer no benefit to overall health for most people, a new analysis suggests. In fact, the people in the study who ate more gluten were 13 percent less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes over the 30-year study than those who ate less gluten, the researchers found. For some individuals, there are health reasons to avoid gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley. Certain people, for example, have an intolerance to gluten, which can lead to abdominal pain, bloating or fatigue. Others have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that affects mostly the small intestine; when people with this disease eat gluten, their immune system responds by attacking the intestine’s lining. However, even some people who do not have celiac disease or an intolerance to gluten believe that gluten-free diets are healthier than those that include gluten products, and the researchers wanted to see whether this belief might have any scientific merit, said lead study author Geng Zong, a nutrition research fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. In the study, the researchers looked at surveys conducted every two to four years in which nearly 200,000 people reported what they ate. The researchers estimated the participants’ gluten intake based on this information, and then looked at which participants went on to develop Type 2 diabetes over the 30-year study period. Type 2 — the most common form of diabetes — occurs when the body has lost the ability to use insulin efficiently. This inability leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage blood vessel walls, nerves and other tissues. The researchers focused on studying the participants’ risk of diabetes because this cond Continue reading >>

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